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Table Of Contents

A NARROW ESCAPE—Part 1
EARLY YEARS
Impressions of the Monarchy
The First World War
Fending for Himself
A New Way
An Unprejudiced Police Offcer in Traunkirchen
In the Clutches of the Authorities
HITLER OCCUPIES AUSTRIA—THE ANSCHLUSS
PERSECUTED BY THE NAZIS
Arrest
Interrogation by the Gestapo in Linz
The Trial
Imprisonment Instead of Freedom
Deportation to the Concentration Camp
Meeting Heinrich Gleissner
BUCHENWALD CONCENTRATION CAMP1
Arrival
The Penal Company “Quarry”
Breaks in the Clouds
Daily Terror
Forbidden Fruit
Secret Signs
Contact with the Clergy
Lightening the Load
A Sick Game
NIEDERHAGEN CONCENTRATION CAMP1
Schüller the Tyrant
The Execution
Humanity?
Murder for a Fortnight’s Leave
Looking at Death
The Smell of Death
Courageous Individuals
Growing Pressure—Differing Reactions
Saved by a Slip
The “Darning Unit”
The Biter Bit
Unimaginable Hunger
Prisoners’ Clothing
Singing
Muselmänner?
Seconds Late—Weeks of Pain
Freedom within Reach
Blind Faith
A Vicious Kick
Sign or Burn
We are the Men Around Here!
A Fall while Painting
Soldiers’ Sick Bay
The Face of Death
A Trick Question?
Spies?
A Terrible Ritual—Reallocation
“Guten Tag!” Instead of “Heil Hitler!”
Coming Home
Forced Labor in Agriculture
The Army Persists
A NARROW ESCAPE—Part 2
LIFE AFTER THE WAR
INTERVIEW
THE STORY OF AN EXTRAORDINARY FRIENDSHIP
My Reasons for Writing the Book
Rejection and Scorn from Childhood On
A Diffcult Project with Positive Results
Why I Published the Book Myself
Reaction to the Book
Experts’ Comments
Documentary
Film Awards
Educational DVD
Events
Hikes to the Meistereben Alpine Hut
Rehabilitation by Leading State Representatives and Honors
Rehabilitation through the Media
“Project USA”: Achieving the Aim with Unbroken Will
USA Tour in Autumn 2004
USA Tour in Spring 2006
USA Tour in Spring 2009 and Film Premiere in November 2012
French and Russian Versions of the Book
Conclusion
APPENDICES
History of Buchenwald Concentration Camp
History of Niederhagen Concentration Camp
History of Ravensbrück Concentration Camp
REFERENCES
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
INDEX OF PERSONS
Film of Leopold Engleitner’s 2004 USA Tour
Film of Leopold Engleitner’s 2006 USA Tour
Book and DVD Taking the Stand: We Have More to Say
P. 1
Unbroken Will

Unbroken Will

Ratings: (0)|Views: 14 |Likes:
Published by Xlibris

History / World War I / World War II / Nazi Concentration Camp Survivor / Holocaust / Biography

"This book is a milestone in recording the horrors of National Socialism. It is essential reading, and I am delighted that the translation has already received such keen attention in the United States."

-Heinz Fischer, president of the Republic of Austria

"This book is not only an enthralling read; every detail in it has also been thoroughly researched. From a scientific point of view, it is one of the most reliable biographies of a victim of National Socialism."

-Professor Walter Manoschek, political scientist, University of Vienna

"You have given current and future generations a priceless gift by recording Mr. Engleitner's life story. His experiences remind us of the strength of the human will to overcome even the most horrible and challenging circumstances."

-Arnold Schwarzenegger, governor of California

WHEN LEOPOLD ENGLEITNER WAS NINE YEARS OLD, an event of historical significance for the world that initiated the First World War took place in his hometown. Moreover, although Leopold Engleitner and his contemporary Adolf Hitler, who was sixteen years his senior, grew up in the same province (Upper Austria) and shared the same cultural background and educational system, the convictions and attitudes they developed were diametrically opposed. Whereas Adolf Hitler caused untold suffering to millions as a merciless mass murderer, Leopold Engleitner devoted his life to peace, refusing to buckle even in the face of death.

The ordinary farmhand found the extraordinary courage to follow his conscience. He refused to serve in Hitler's army and did not even use the Nazi greeting "Heil Hitler!" Suffering unspeakable cruelty in three concentration camps he grew so thin that he weighed less than sixty-two pounds. Yet nothing and no one could break his will. Astoundingly, he could easily have had his freedom: all he had to do was sign a paper renouncing his religious convictions as one of Jehovah's Witnesses, but he steadfastly refused. And he never lost his optimism. In the concentration camp, he even bought a suitcase for the journey home it seemed impossible he would ever make.

His unshakable faith in God helped Engleitner to lead a full and happy life despite constant rejection, and he never lost his zest for life as he became the oldest and one of the best known male concentration camp survivors in the world. His unexpected rehabilitation was achieved thanks to an extraordinary friendship. Though already far advanced in years, he travelled more than ninety-five thousand miles across Europe and the USA, between 1999 and 2012, testifying as a witness of history to ensure the past is not forgotten; as such, he became a model of tolerance and peace.

Letters written by Engleitner during his internment and believed lost for nearly sixty years were discovered; and their combination with original minutes of police and court proceedings, reports from the concentration camps, and personal accounts of traumatic childhood incidents from one hundred years ago constitutes an impressive firsthand history.

History / World War I / World War II / Nazi Concentration Camp Survivor / Holocaust / Biography

"This book is a milestone in recording the horrors of National Socialism. It is essential reading, and I am delighted that the translation has already received such keen attention in the United States."

-Heinz Fischer, president of the Republic of Austria

"This book is not only an enthralling read; every detail in it has also been thoroughly researched. From a scientific point of view, it is one of the most reliable biographies of a victim of National Socialism."

-Professor Walter Manoschek, political scientist, University of Vienna

"You have given current and future generations a priceless gift by recording Mr. Engleitner's life story. His experiences remind us of the strength of the human will to overcome even the most horrible and challenging circumstances."

-Arnold Schwarzenegger, governor of California

WHEN LEOPOLD ENGLEITNER WAS NINE YEARS OLD, an event of historical significance for the world that initiated the First World War took place in his hometown. Moreover, although Leopold Engleitner and his contemporary Adolf Hitler, who was sixteen years his senior, grew up in the same province (Upper Austria) and shared the same cultural background and educational system, the convictions and attitudes they developed were diametrically opposed. Whereas Adolf Hitler caused untold suffering to millions as a merciless mass murderer, Leopold Engleitner devoted his life to peace, refusing to buckle even in the face of death.

The ordinary farmhand found the extraordinary courage to follow his conscience. He refused to serve in Hitler's army and did not even use the Nazi greeting "Heil Hitler!" Suffering unspeakable cruelty in three concentration camps he grew so thin that he weighed less than sixty-two pounds. Yet nothing and no one could break his will. Astoundingly, he could easily have had his freedom: all he had to do was sign a paper renouncing his religious convictions as one of Jehovah's Witnesses, but he steadfastly refused. And he never lost his optimism. In the concentration camp, he even bought a suitcase for the journey home it seemed impossible he would ever make.

His unshakable faith in God helped Engleitner to lead a full and happy life despite constant rejection, and he never lost his zest for life as he became the oldest and one of the best known male concentration camp survivors in the world. His unexpected rehabilitation was achieved thanks to an extraordinary friendship. Though already far advanced in years, he travelled more than ninety-five thousand miles across Europe and the USA, between 1999 and 2012, testifying as a witness of history to ensure the past is not forgotten; as such, he became a model of tolerance and peace.

Letters written by Engleitner during his internment and believed lost for nearly sixty years were discovered; and their combination with original minutes of police and court proceedings, reports from the concentration camps, and personal accounts of traumatic childhood incidents from one hundred years ago constitutes an impressive firsthand history.

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Publish date: Dec 30, 2013
Added to Scribd: Feb 28, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9781493157839
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