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Ghost Buggy (1935)

Ghost Buggy (1935)

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Published by draculavanhelsing
Adelaide Chronicle 1935 (Jan 3)
Adelaide Chronicle 1935 (Jan 3)

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Published by: draculavanhelsing on Mar 02, 2014
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12/21/2014

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Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), Thursday 3 January 1935, page 44National Library of Australiahttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article92366694
A
I
JJKE
most
ofthe
big
cattlestationsof
SO
yearsago,
the
old
Worn
bundary
run
on
theRiver
Cooper,
inWestern
Queensland,
was
un
fenced.
To
prevent
thecattlefrom
straying
offthe
runa
seriesof
out-stations
were
established
on
theboundaries,each
in
charge
of
a
man
whosejob
was
toride
theboundary
lines,
looking
forcattle
tracks
which
wouldindicate
thatstockhad
strayed.
Hewould
then
followthemup,musterthe
strays
anddrivethemback.
One
of
theseout-stations
was
namedCockawarraand
was
in
charge
of
a
man
namedCook.A
stranger
came
ridingalong
one
day
saw
theCockawarrahutand
turned
offthe
track
to
visit
the
man
wholivedthere,
knowingthathe
wouldbemade
welcome,
forthe
boundary
ridersofthose
days
lived
dreadfullylonely
lives.
Uponopening
thehutdoor
tie
found
the
unfortunateCook
in
bed,
almost
too
ill
to
speak.
After
doing
whathe
could
for
the
sickman,thetraveller
galloped
intotheheadstation.As
soonas
Reid,
thestationmanager,heardof
Cook s
plight,he
harnessed
a
pairof
horses
o
his
buggy
and
wentoutwith
thetravellerto
bring
thesick
man
in.
They
foundhimmuch
worse.
After
wrapping
nun
in
blankets
they
laid
 No
leavee,tlacks.
Me
no
likee him
on
thefloorof
the
buggy
andstarted
back,butbefore
a
mileofthe
journey
hadbeen
covered,Cook
died.As
hissymptomspointed
to
typhoid
they
decidednottocarry
the
body
further.ThetravellerwentbacktoCockawarra
toget
a
shovel,and
a
grave
was
dug
beside
thetrack.
StrangeStory
TNduecourse,
another
manwas
sent
?*-
outtotake
charge
atCockawarra.
When
he
came
infor
supplies
a
monthlaterhewentuptoReidandsaid,
 Lookhere,
boss,
thatplace
is
getting
on
my
nerves.
AfterI dbeenthereabout
a
weekI
heard
a
buggycoming
atnineo clockin
theevening.
I
re
lit
the
fire
and
put
thebillyon,think
ing
you
were
coming
outtopay
meavisit.
Whenthe
buggy
seemed
quite
closethesound
stoppedsuddenly.
Thinking
that
you
had
lostyourwayIwentoutside
andshouted,
but
nobody
answered.I6atup
till
atfer
midnight,
butheard
nothing
further.Next
morn
ing
I
searched
everywhere
aroundthe
hut,but
couldn t
find
a
track.
The
same
thinghas
happened
twicesince.IreckonCook s
ghost
is
haunting
thatplace. Reid
was
at
first
inclined
to
treatthe
matter
asa
joke,but
waen
the
man
stucktohis
story
themanagerdecidedthat
itwasa
stupiddodgetoget
a
shiftsomewhere
else,
and
or
deredhimtogo
back.
The
man
obeyed,
but
returned
within
a
week, Tve
heard
that
buggy
again,
hesaid,
 and
I mnot
stopping.
Give
me
mypayrmofftolookforanotherjob.
The
managersent
another
 inn
outtotakehisplace,
buthe,
too,
came
backwith
the
same
story.Just
then
a
Chi
nesecame
alonglooking
for
work,andReidengaged
him
on
the
spot,tookhimout
to
Cockawarrabeforeanyone
could
tell
him
ofthe Ghost
Buggy, showedhim
whatto
do,
and
left
him.TheChinaman
was
back
within
a
fort
 
was
a
night.
 Buggy
come
on,
nocomeon.
Noleaveetlacks.
Me
no
likee
was
histerse
comment.
Manager
Hears
ItREID
did
notknowwhat
to
makeof
 
thebusiness.
The
tale
sounded
utterly
absurd—yetthree
men
had
sworn
they
hadheard
it.
He
decided
to
goout
toCockawarra
himselfand
seeif
there
was
any
truth
in
it.
Hecarried
out
thisintentionduring
the
following
week—andheardthe
buggy
himself.Next
morning
he
huntedin
vainfor
tracks.
Afterthis
he
instructed
thetwo
stockmen
wholivedat
theadjoining
out-stationsto
lengthen
their
patrols
to
includethe
Cockawarra
end
of
the
run,andleftthehut
empty.In
1890,
theCockawarracountry
was
leasedbytheKeerongoolooPastoralCompany,
forwhomIworked
asa
stockman.
I
wasone
of
a
partysent
out
tobuildmusteringyards
near
thedeserted
hut,and,
as
was
onlynaturalthesubject
ofthe
 GhostBuggy
was
brought
uparound
our
campfireat
night.
There
is
not
an
atomofsuperstitution
inmy
make-up;
Irefused
to
believe
a
wordof
the
yarnand
offered
to
sleep
atthe
hut
toprovemy
disbe
lief.
WhenImadethis
announcement
an
oldstockman
namedTom
Johnson
said,Tmwithyou;I
don t
believethese
ghost
yarns.
We ll
both
sleep
there.
Accompanied
by
Ivo,my
bladeboy,
andthreedogs,
we
setofffor
thehut,carrying
our
blanket
rolls.
Wefound
that
itwas
theusualbush
hut
ofsplit
timber,
with
a
barkroof,and
still
quite
sound.
Nothinghappened
that
night,
but
on
the
followingnight,
just
asirewere
thinking
of
turninginto
our
blankets,
my
cattle-dog
ran
tothedoorandbarked.Ivoorderedhim
to
lie
down,listened
for
a
moment,then
turnedto
us
tosay,
 Buggy
come
on.
AminutelaterJohnsonandIheard
it
toothesoundof
a
pair
oftrottinghorses. That s
no
blanky
ghosfc,
anyway,
saidJohnson,kicking
thefire
together
and
putting
a
billyofwateron,inorderto
greetthe
travellerwiththe
usual
bushhospitality.Thenhe
joined
Ivoand
me
outsidethe
hut,
where
wewere
waiting
forthe
buggy
toappear.
No
Trace
TPHE
countryroundabout
was
a
series
?*-
of
gravelly
ridges,
sparsely
timbered,and
a
full
moonlit
the
scene
up
bright
as
day.
Nearerand
nearercame
the
sound,
until
we
couldhearthe
gravelcrunching
underthe
wheels,
thedrum
ming
of
thehoofs,
andthejinglingof
the
harness
buckles.
I
was
intheactof
saying,
 Itmust
be
someone
fromof
saying,
 Itmust
be
someone
from
Wombundary,
whenthesoundceasedabruptly.We
waited
for
a
few
mo
ments,thenshouted
inorderto
guide
thetraveller
to
our
camp.
Only
the
echoes
answered.
Andnotuntilthendid
it
dawn
on
us
that
we
had
heardthevery Ghost
Buggy
whoseexistence
we
hadscoffedat Next
morningthe
black
boy
scouredthe
country
over
a
mile
radiusfrom
thehut,butfound
no
sign
ofany
fresh
tracks.Tosaythatwe
were
mystified
is
to
put
it
mildly.We
discussed
it
time
and
timeagain,refusingtogive
it
any
supernaturalexplanation,
andat
lengthdecided
that
it
must
be
a
remarkableecho.There
5sno
otherexplanation
possible,and
itIs
by
nomeansan
ab
surd
one.
I
haveoften
readintheJournalofthe
Royal
Meteorological Wewaitedandshouted.
...
Only
theechoesanswered. Society
of
sounds
travelling
forincre
dible
distances
over
open
country,
onecase
being
thatof
a
fieldgun
having
been
heard
overa
distance
of80
mites
inthe
Syrian
desert.
RemarkableEchoes
l-l
EKE,
at
Bordertown,
theexpress
to
**?
Melbourne
arrivesat10.30pan.every
day.
Stevenminutesbefore
it
arrives,
however,
it
can
be
heardquite
distinctlyfor
the
spaceofabout30
seconds,
thenthesound
ceases
abruptly
andthe
train
is
notheard
again
until
it
is
quite
close.Itmustbe
quite
12milesaway
when
itisfirst
heard.Near
MountGambler
there
isa
house
on
whosefrontverandah
all
the
traffic
ona
road
quite
fivemitesaway
can
beheard
quite
plainly;
if
you
move
offtheverandahthesoundbecomesinaudible.An
evenmore
remarkable
 Whispering
Gallery
effect
can
beheard
on
the
damof
the
BarossaReservoir,
about
20
miles
from
Adelaide.
If
a
tickingwatch
is
held
near
thesouthwallofthedamit
can
beheard
quite
distinctly
by
a
personattheotherendof
theand
if
a
on
the

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