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The Perceptions in the Religious Feeling.

The Perceptions in the Religious Feeling.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY NEWMAN, SMYTH.

We are now prepared for a step in advance.
The religious feeling, like the feeling of exist-
ence, is a primary source of experieace to be
derived from nothing before itself. But does
the religions feeling involve a religious per-
ception ? All sensation seems to involve per-
ception. From the feeling of existence is
evolved the knowledge of existence, though,
perhaps, a considerable period of infancy may
be required for the new feeling of existence
to take form in the definite consciousness of a
personal soul.
BY NEWMAN, SMYTH.

We are now prepared for a step in advance.
The religious feeling, like the feeling of exist-
ence, is a primary source of experieace to be
derived from nothing before itself. But does
the religions feeling involve a religious per-
ception ? All sensation seems to involve per-
ception. From the feeling of existence is
evolved the knowledge of existence, though,
perhaps, a considerable period of infancy may
be required for the new feeling of existence
to take form in the definite consciousness of a
personal soul.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Mar 04, 2014
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03/04/2014

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THE PERCEPTIONS IN THE RELIGIOUS FEELING.BY NEWMAN, SMYTH.We are now prepared for a step in advance. The religious feeling, like the feeling of exist-ence, is a primary source of experieace to be derived from nothing before itself. But does the religions feeling involve a religious per-ception ? All sensation seems to involve per-ception. From the feeling of existence is evolved the knowledge of existence, though, perhaps, a considerable period of infancy may be required for the new feeling of existence to take form in the definite consciousness of a personal soul. Thus, also, our bodily sensa-tions give rise to the perceptions of objective phenomena; and these sense-perceptions are the starting-points of all science. But does the religious feeling, likewise, yield immedi-ately a religious perception ? Is it in the same manner a source of knowledge ? The process by which the mind arrives at knowledge, genei'ally speaking, may be said
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SPIRITUAL PERCEPTION. 1 07 to run tlirougli the following stages ; — first, sensation ; second, perception ; third, the de-fining the sense-perception by means of other perceptions, or the forming the idea of a thing ; fourth, the combination of ideas in a  judgment ; and, finally, the verification of ideas so formed either by various combina-tions of them (deductive reasoning), or by returning to their sources, and starting from renewed observation of phenomena ' (induc-tive reasoning). Is theology a knowledge of God to be gained and verified by similar processes, and on the same principles, by which we arrive at our other knowledges ? I maintain that the religious feeling involves perception, and is, therefore, the valid source of theology. More than this, I maintain that the ideas gained
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primarily through the feeling of absolute de-pendence are the conditions of all ordered, or scientific knowledge. * Had man not been organized first for God, he would not have been organized for knowledge of the creation. * Nitsch(" System der Christ. Lehre,'' p. 25) maintains : "The feeling (Das Gefiihl) has reason and is reason, and the felt con-sciousness of God produces out of itself ground-perceptions ... by Tirtue of which before all scientific mediation it caa rule and condition the whole domain of conceptions." Similarly TJlrici("Gott undMensch.," I., 2d. Th., p. 243) urges that the religious feeUitg is the necessary condition of all knowledge without which we could not rise above the level of the brute. See, also, Lotze, "Mikrokosmus," Bd. 3, p. 549. To8 THE RELIGIOUS FEELING. Science, to a person without religious endow-ment, would be impossible, as it is to the brute. The religious power I hold to be the " primum mobile " of human thought. With-
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