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Religious Feelings Conclusions

Religious Feelings Conclusions

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Published by glennpease
BY NEWMAN, SMYTH.

Before proceeding directly to the verifica-
tion of the conclusion now reached, we must
clear the subject of certain misconceptions to
which it is exposed, and free our reasoning of
objections which consequently May be brought
against it. BY NEWMAN, SMYTH.

Before proceeding directly to the verifica-
tion of the conclusion now reached, we must
clear the subject of certain misconceptions to
which it is exposed, and free our reasoning of
objections which consequently May be brought
against it.
BY NEWMAN, SMYTH.

Before proceeding directly to the verifica-
tion of the conclusion now reached, we must
clear the subject of certain misconceptions to
which it is exposed, and free our reasoning of
objections which consequently May be brought
against it. BY NEWMAN, SMYTH.

Before proceeding directly to the verifica-
tion of the conclusion now reached, we must
clear the subject of certain misconceptions to
which it is exposed, and free our reasoning of
objections which consequently May be brought
against it.

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Published by: glennpease on Mar 04, 2014
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RELIGIOUS FEELINGS CONCLUSIONSBY NEWMAN, SMYTH.Before proceeding directly to the verifica-tion of the conclusion now reached, we must clear the subject of certain misconceptions to which it is exposed, and free our reasoning of objections which consequently roay be brought against it. The objection lies upon the surface of our reasoning — but only upon the surface — that the feelings which we have regarded as the ori-ginating impulses of all our thinking are them-selves the results, also, of thinking. It is un-deniably true that knowledge ends, as well as begins, in feeling. From feeling through ideas to feeling, is the common course of our intel-lectual life. Yon feel the beauty of a land-scape, or a picture ; you discover the features which produced that feeling, and you come away with an enhanced sense of the beautiful. Feeling is both before and after kno^vledge, and all knowledge serves to em-ich feeling.
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So it is of our sense of goodness and of God. The knowledge of God ends in senti-OBJECTIONS.— THE SPIRITUAL FACULTY. 141 ments more exalted than tlie feelings from which it springs. The last efEort of thought, the highest possible state of mind, is worship. But from our power to puiify and to enrich our moral and religious feelings through a thoughtful, worshipful life, it does not follow that they are simply, or entirely, the results of our thoughts; on the other hand we only cul-tivate what already exists to be iiuproved ; we put to life's exchangers the talents already giv-en us as our personal capital. This objection would lie against our reasoning, therefore, only in so far as it could be shown that any feeling regarded as original has been obviously de-rived from other elements, of experience.
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Again, it may be alleged that the mind possesses no special sense for goodness, or for Grod, as it is fitted out, through the body, with special senses for apprehending external things. But, in the view above taken, con-science is not regarded as a special sense, but as that general feeling of an eternal right, or goodness, which, like the feeling of exist-ence, comes to us, not through a particular fac-ulty, but in and through our very being what we are. The endeavor of Bishop Butler to map out man's nature into certain original faculties, or native principles of conduct, of which con-science is one, and the supreme one, may be a true description of man, as good Bishop Butler 142 THE RELIGIOUS FEELING. observed him in the eighteenth century ; but no map of om- faculties does justice either to the real unity of our spiritual nature, or to the historical development of our powers. The
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