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Beware the ghosts of medical researchHow Big Pharma has developed new forms of ‘research’ to serve their own interestsBy Marc-André Gagnon and Sergio Sismondo

Beware the ghosts of medical researchHow Big Pharma has developed new forms of ‘research’ to serve their own interestsBy Marc-André Gagnon and Sergio Sismondo

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Published by EvidenceNetwork.ca
The medical research world has been concerned about the problem of ghostwriting for more than a decade. Over the few past years, the issue has been repeatedly raised in the mainstream media. Most of the commentary has focused on the ethics of academics serving as authors on papers they did not write and on some of the most egregious actions by pharmaceutical companies.

But these efforts miss the ways in which Big Pharma has developed new forms of medical research to serve its own interests.

The medical research world has been concerned about the problem of ghostwriting for more than a decade. Over the few past years, the issue has been repeatedly raised in the mainstream media. Most of the commentary has focused on the ethics of academics serving as authors on papers they did not write and on some of the most egregious actions by pharmaceutical companies.

But these efforts miss the ways in which Big Pharma has developed new forms of medical research to serve its own interests.

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Published by: EvidenceNetwork.ca on Mar 06, 2014
Copyright:Attribution No Derivatives

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09/01/2014

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umanitoba.ca
http://umanitoba.ca/outreach/evidencenetwork/archives/4961
Beware the ghosts of medical research
How Big Pharma has developed new forms of ‘research’ to serve their own interests
 A version of this commentary appeared in the Mark News, Troy Media and Times & Transcript 
The medical research world has been concerned about theproblem of ghostwriting for more than a decade. Over the fewpast years, the issue has been repeatedly raised in themainstream media. Most of the commentary has focused on theethics of academics serving as authors on papers they did notwrite and on some of the most egregious actions bypharmaceutical companies.But these efforts miss the ways in which Big Pharma hasdeveloped new forms of medical research to serve its owninterests.
How Ghostwriting Feeds Big Pharma Profits
Big Pharma firms spend twice as much on promotion as on R&D. But it is worse than that: more and more medicalR&D is organized as promotional campaigns to make physicians aware of products. The bulk of the industry’sexternal funding for research now goes to contract research organizations to produce studies that feed into largenumbers of articles submitted to medical journals.Internal documents from Pfizer, made public in litigation, showed that 85 scientific articles on its antidepressant Zoloftwere produced and coordinated by a public relations company. Pfizer itself thus produced a critical mass of thefavorable articles placed among the 211 scientific papers on Zoloft in the same period. Internal documents tell similar stories for Merck’s Vioxx, GlaxoSmithKline’s Paxil, Astra-Zeneca’s Seroquel, and Wyeth’s hormone-replacementdrugs.To promote the now-notorious Vioxx, Merck organized a ghostwriting campaign that involved some 96 scientificarticles. Key ones did not mention the death of some patients during clinical trials. Through a class action lawsuitagainst Vioxx in Australia, it was discovered that Elsevier had created a fake medical journal for Merck —
the Australasian Journal of Joint and Bone Medicine —
and perhaps ten other fake journals for Merck and other BigPharma companies.In another example, GlaxoSmithKline organized a ghostwriting program to promote its antidepressant Paxil. According to internal documents made public in 2009, the program was called “Case Study Publication for Peer-Review”, or CASPPER, a playful reference to the “friendly ghost”. Such strategies are not exceptions; they are nowthe norm in the industry. Most new drugs with blockbuster potential are introduced accompanied by 50, 60, or even100 medical journal articles. Any firm that refused to play this game in the name of ethics would likely lose marketshare. Profits in the pharmaceutical industry depend on companies’ capacity to influence medical knowledge andcreate market share and market niches for their products.
A Call for Evidence-Based Medicine
In 2008, research showed that pharmaceutical companies systematically failed to publish negative studies on their SSRIs, the Prozac generation of antidepressants. Of 74 clinical trials, 38 produced positive results and 36 did not:

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