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Rarely Used F Words

Rarely Used F Words

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Rarely Used F Words
Facetious •
adjective
trivially or inappropriately humorous.
 — DERIVATIVES
 
facetiously
 
adverb
 
facetiousness
 
noun
.
 — ORIGIN
French
facétieux 
, from Latin
facetia 
‘jest’.Facile •
adjective
 
1
ignoring the complexities of an issue; superficial.
2
(of an achievement)easily accomplished.
 — DERIVATIVES
 
facilely
 
adverb
 
facileness
 
noun
.
 — ORIGIN
Latin
facilis 
‘easy’.Factitious •
adjective
artificial; contrived.
 — DERIVATIVES
 
factitiously
 
adverb
 
factitiousness
 
noun
.
 — ORIGIN
Latin
facticius 
‘made by art’.Fallow •
adjective
 
1
(of farmland) ploughed and harrowed but left for a period without beingsown.
2
characterized by inactivity.
3
(of a sow) not pregnant.
noun
a piece of fallow land.
 — DERIVATIVES
 
fallowness
 
noun
.
 — ORIGIN
Old English.
noun
a pale brown or reddish yellow colour.
 — ORIGIN
Old English.Fanlight
noun
a small window, typically semicircular, over a door or another window.Farina •
noun
flour or meal made of cereal grains, nuts, or starchy roots.
 — DERIVATIVES
 
farinaceous
/farri
nay
shss
adjective
.
 — ORIGIN
Latin, from
far 
‘corn’.Fatuous •
adjective
silly and pointless.
 — DERIVATIVES
 
fatuity
 
noun
(
pl.
 
fatuities
)
fatuously
 
adverb
 
fatuousness
 
noun
.
 — ORIGIN
Latin
fatuus 
‘foolish’.Febrile •
adjective
 
1
having or showing the symptoms of a fever.
2
having or showing a greatdeal of nervous excitement.
 — ORIGIN
Latin
febrilis 
, from
febris 
‘fever’.
 
Feckless •
adjective
 
1
ineffectual; feeble.
2
unthinking and irresponsible.
 — DERIVATIVES
 
fecklessly
 
adverb
 
fecklessness
 
noun
.
 — ORIGIN
from Scots and northern English dialect
feck 
, from
effeck 
, variant of
EFFECT
.Feint •
noun
a deceptive or pretended attacking movement, especially in boxing or fencing.
verb
make a feint.
 — ORIGIN
French
feinte 
, from
feindre 
‘feign’.
adjective
denoting paper printed with faint lines as a guide for handwriting.
 — ORIGIN
variant of
.Felicity •
noun
(
pl.
 
felicities
)
1
complete happiness.
2
the ability to express oneself appropriately.
3
a felicitous feature of a work of literature or art.
 — ORIGIN
Latin
felicitas 
, from
felix 
‘happy’.Femur •
noun
(
pl.
 
femurs
or
femora
femm
r/)
Anatomy
the bone of the thigh or upper hindlimb.
 — DERIVATIVES
 
femoral
 
adjective
,
 — ORIGIN
Latin, ‘thigh’.Fender •
noun
 
1
a low frame bordering a fireplace to keep in falling coals.
2
a cushioning devicehung over a ship’s side to protect it against impact.
3
 
N. Amer.
the mudguard or area around thewheel well of a vehicle.Ferrule •
noun
 
1
a ring or cap which strengthens the end of a handle, stick, or tube.
2
a metalband strengthening or forming a joint.
 — ORIGIN
Old French
virelle 
, from Latin
viriae 
‘bracelets’.Fetid •
adjective
smelling very unpleasant.
 — ORIGIN
Latin
fetidus 
, from
fetere 
‘to stink’.Fetlock •
noun
a joint of a horse’s or other quadruped’s leg between the knee and the hoof.
 — ORIGIN
Germanic, related to
FOOT
.Fettle •
noun
condition:
in fine fettle.
 
 — ORIGIN
Old English, strip of material.Fey •
adjective
 
1
unworldly and vague.
2
having clairvoyant powers.
 — ORIGIN
Old English.
 
Fibula •
noun
(
pl.
 
fibulae
fib
yoolee/ or
fibulas
)
Anatomy
the outer and usually smaller of the twobones between the knee and the ankle, parallel with the tibia.
 — ORIGIN
Latin, ‘brooch’, because the shape it makes with the tibia resembles a clasp.Field Glasses
plural noun
binoculars for outdoor use.Fife •
noun
a small shrill flute used with the drum in military bands.
 — ORIGIN
German
Pfeife 
‘pipe’Filament •
noun
 
1
a slender thread-like object or fibre.
2
a metal wire in an electric light bulb,which glows white-hot when an electric current is passed through it.
3
 
Botany
the slender part of astamen that supports the anther.
 — DERIVATIVES
 
filamentary
 
adjective
 
filamentous
 
adjective
.
 — ORIGIN
Latin
filamentum 
, from
filare 
‘to spin’.Filch •
verb
 
informal
pilfer; steal.
 — ORIGIN
of unknown origin.Filibuster •
noun
prolonged speaking which obstructs progress in a legislative assembly.
verb
obstruct legislation with a filibuster.
 — ORIGIN
French
flibustier 
, first applied to pirates who pillaged the Spanish colonies in the WestIndies, influenced by Spanish
filibustero 
; ultimately from Dutch
vrijbuiter 
‘freebooter’.Filigree •
noun
delicate ornamental work of fine gold, silver, or copper wire.
 — DERIVATIVES
 
filigreed
 
adjective
.
 — ORIGIN
from Latin
filum 
‘thread’ +
granum 
‘seed’).Fink •
noun
 
1
an unpleasant or contemptible person.
2
an informer.
verb
 
1
(
fink on
) inform on.
2
(
fink out
) back out of a responsibility.
 — ORIGIN
of unknown origin.Fiord •
noun
a long, narrow, deep inlet of the sea between high cliffs, found predominantly inNorway.
 — ORIGIN
Norwegian.Firebreak •
noun
an obstacle to the spread of fire, e.g. a strip of open space in a forest.Firmware •
noun
 
Computing
permanent software programmed into a read-only memory.

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