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Asian Journal March 7-13, 2014 Edition

Asian Journal March 7-13, 2014 Edition

Ratings: (0)|Views: 128 |Likes:
Published by ASIAN JOURNAL
RAIN RAIN GO AWAY BY SIMEON G SILVERIO JR P1, THE ILLUSIONS OF FALLEN HUMANITY BY MSGR FERNANDO GUTIERREZ P8, TECH TRENDS; PHILIPPINE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS 2016: HISTORY WILL REPEAT ITSELF BY BENJAMIN MAYNIGO P6, MINOR CHILDREN MY BE ABLE TO IMMIGRATE FASTER AS DERIVATIVE BENEFICIARIES BY ATTY DENNIS CHUA U.S. IMMIGRATION LAWYER IN LEGAL BUZZ P2, PROFIT IN DOING NOTHING IN MAUI BY ERNIE DELFIN IN THE METAMORPHOSIS P5, DEFINING OURSELVES BY ERVIN GALDIANO IN CONTEMPORARY ASIAN AMERICAN ISSUES P5, RIGHT OR WRONG BY BILL LABESTRE P6, ASIAN HERITAGE: DANVIC BRIONES AND HIS LIFE-SAVING VEST BY MILES BEAUCHAMP P6, HARDSHIP WAIVER OF THE JOINT PETITION REQUIREMENT TO LIFE CONDITION IN MARRIAGE ADJUSTMENT CASES BY ATTY SUSAN V PEREZ P7, PAG-ASA (5) BY VIRGINIA H. FERRER P8, PRODUCT REVIEW: CHARGEKEY BY BENJAMIN MAYNIGO P9, JESUS THE SON OF GOD BY ZENA SULTANA BABAO P13, MINI MARCH MADNESS WEDNESDAY IN MARCH AT SYCUAN P11, KENICHI EBINA DANCE-ISH ENTERTAINMENT APRIL 12 AND APRIL 13 AT PECHANGA RESORT AND CASINO P12, PORKY'S LECHON BARBECUE, BOBBY’S COMPLETE AUTO REPAIR, NOWAK AESTHETICS,, PECHANGA LUNAR NEW YEAR TABLE GAME PROMOTION P 16, Community News, Asian Journal San Diego, MARCH 7-13, 2014 Digital Edition, M BEAUTY TIME MACHINE DR TESS MAURICIO, Offices of Chua Tinsay Vega Immigration Law, Atty Rogelio Karagdag Jr U.S. Immigration Law, Atty Susan V Perez U.S. Immigration Law, San Diego News, Philippine News, Arts & Culture, Profiles, Balintataw by Virginia Ferrer, Lower Your Nets by Monsignor Fernando Gutierrez, Light & Shadows by Zena Sultana Babao, At Large by Miles Beauchamp, Take It From My Barber by Benjamin Maynigo, Street Poetry by Michael R Tagudin, Classified Ads, APARTMENT FOR RENT, CHUC HOANG TAX SERVICE P16, Atty Gail Dulay Harold Hom Immigration Lawyers, CLASSIFIED AD, Wanted Caregiver, LOWER YOUR NETS BY MSGR Gutierrez
RAIN RAIN GO AWAY BY SIMEON G SILVERIO JR P1, THE ILLUSIONS OF FALLEN HUMANITY BY MSGR FERNANDO GUTIERREZ P8, TECH TRENDS; PHILIPPINE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS 2016: HISTORY WILL REPEAT ITSELF BY BENJAMIN MAYNIGO P6, MINOR CHILDREN MY BE ABLE TO IMMIGRATE FASTER AS DERIVATIVE BENEFICIARIES BY ATTY DENNIS CHUA U.S. IMMIGRATION LAWYER IN LEGAL BUZZ P2, PROFIT IN DOING NOTHING IN MAUI BY ERNIE DELFIN IN THE METAMORPHOSIS P5, DEFINING OURSELVES BY ERVIN GALDIANO IN CONTEMPORARY ASIAN AMERICAN ISSUES P5, RIGHT OR WRONG BY BILL LABESTRE P6, ASIAN HERITAGE: DANVIC BRIONES AND HIS LIFE-SAVING VEST BY MILES BEAUCHAMP P6, HARDSHIP WAIVER OF THE JOINT PETITION REQUIREMENT TO LIFE CONDITION IN MARRIAGE ADJUSTMENT CASES BY ATTY SUSAN V PEREZ P7, PAG-ASA (5) BY VIRGINIA H. FERRER P8, PRODUCT REVIEW: CHARGEKEY BY BENJAMIN MAYNIGO P9, JESUS THE SON OF GOD BY ZENA SULTANA BABAO P13, MINI MARCH MADNESS WEDNESDAY IN MARCH AT SYCUAN P11, KENICHI EBINA DANCE-ISH ENTERTAINMENT APRIL 12 AND APRIL 13 AT PECHANGA RESORT AND CASINO P12, PORKY'S LECHON BARBECUE, BOBBY’S COMPLETE AUTO REPAIR, NOWAK AESTHETICS,, PECHANGA LUNAR NEW YEAR TABLE GAME PROMOTION P 16, Community News, Asian Journal San Diego, MARCH 7-13, 2014 Digital Edition, M BEAUTY TIME MACHINE DR TESS MAURICIO, Offices of Chua Tinsay Vega Immigration Law, Atty Rogelio Karagdag Jr U.S. Immigration Law, Atty Susan V Perez U.S. Immigration Law, San Diego News, Philippine News, Arts & Culture, Profiles, Balintataw by Virginia Ferrer, Lower Your Nets by Monsignor Fernando Gutierrez, Light & Shadows by Zena Sultana Babao, At Large by Miles Beauchamp, Take It From My Barber by Benjamin Maynigo, Street Poetry by Michael R Tagudin, Classified Ads, APARTMENT FOR RENT, CHUC HOANG TAX SERVICE P16, Atty Gail Dulay Harold Hom Immigration Lawyers, CLASSIFIED AD, Wanted Caregiver, LOWER YOUR NETS BY MSGR Gutierrez

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Philippines among the world’s ‘mega’ biotech crop producers
Teresita Sy-Coson and Vivian Que-Azcona
Good News Pilipinas | MANILA, 3/7/2014 -- Two female magnates from the Philippines Teresita Sy-Coson and Vivian Que-Azcona were cited by Forbes Asia in its list of most powerful business-ABS CBN News | MA- NILA, 3/7/2014-- The Bureau of Customs on Thursday
conscated 100 pieces of
USD 100 bills hidden inside a magazine and placed inside a  brown envelope.The parcel came from a certain Jon Estill from Pennsylvania, USA and is addressed to Roy Lopez of Customs Bonded Warehouse 31 of the International Cargo Terminal near the Ninoy Aquino International Airport Terminal 1 (NAIA-1).
Corazon Mansueto, a Customs examiner, discovered the money after she became suspicious and opened the  parcel. - by Raoul Esperas
March 7-13, 2014
(Continued on page 15)
 
Philippine RadioAM 1450M-F 7-8 PM
The original and first Asian Journal in America
550 E. 8th St., Ste. 6, National City, San Diego County CA USA 91950 | Ph: 619.474.0588 | Fx: 619.474.0373 | Email: asianjournal@aol.com | www.asianjournalusa.com
PRST STDU.S. Postage PaidPermit No. 203Chula Vista CA 91910
San Diego’s first and only Asian Filipino weekly publication and a multi-award winning newspaper! Online+Digital+Print Editions to best serve you!
March 7-13, 2014
Zena BabaoMsgr. Gutierrez
Ben Maynigo
 PHL Presidential  Elections 2016: History will repeat itself .. p 6 
(Continued on page 7)
Sy-Coson, Azcona in Forbes  Asia power list of biz women
 Jesus, the Son of God
 .. p 13
(Continued on page 2)
The Illusions of Fallen  Humanity .. p 8
(Continued on page 14)
Customs seizes USD 10,000 hidden inside magazine38 women? Just suspicions of a wife–Enrile
(Continued on page 6)
 
Rain, Rain Go Away
"Rain, rain, go away, come again, another day. Little Pablo wants to play!"This is one of the earliest poems my mother taught me when I was growing up in the Philippines. Whenever the monsoon rain came, we would be stuck inside our house, bored and unable to play outside. Hence the rhyme.Today, rain came to San Diego for the second time after a long hot summer. The lack
of rain was partly blamed for the disastrous wild res that hit America's Finest City two
months ago. They burned down about a thousand homes and cost a few lives. Rain came a
week late after the re. Today, it came the second time around.
 
Five inches of rain
In nearby Los Angeles, ve inches of rain fell within two hours causing ash oods to sweep along the city streets. The oods, which came during rush hours, endangered the lives of many commuters and damaged their vehicles. Trafc was so heavy that many
 people going home were stranded in the streets and freeways for hours. To add insult to injury, hail fell in some areas burying some vehicles up to their wheels. No matter how heavy the rains would be here in Southern California, however, they
are nothing compared to those in the Philippines. I remember when I rst arrived from the
Philippines some 25 years ago in 1982. My mother-in-law picked us up from the airport
The poem "rain, rain, go away, come again, another day," is perhaps one of the few  poems my mother taught me that I would not be able to teach my children and my  future grandchildren as they grow up here in the United States. Over here in Southern California where only a few inches of rains fall say about 20 days a year, rains are welcomed and even encouraged like manna falling from heaven!
 by Ed K. Usman, Good  News Pilipinas | MANILA, 3/6/2014 -- The Philippines has landed in the ranks of the 19 “mega-countries” which are growing 50,000 hectares or more of biotechnology (biotech) crops.In the country’s case, only  biotech (Bt) corn, the yellow variety, is being planted by farmers, but they have ear-lier expressed willingness to adopt Bt cotton, Bt eggplant, and Gold Rice, which are in the pipeline, once the geneti-
cally modied (GM) crops are
ready for commercialization. There are now 800,000 hect-ares being planted, as of 2013,  by biotech-adopting farm-ers in the country, a report released by the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications (ISAAA), pointed out.ISAAA’s report is called the “Global Status of Com-mercialized Biotech/GM
Crops: 2013″ made public
on Feb. 13, 2014. Of the 27 countries growing the still highly-controversial GM crops, the Philippines ranked  No. 12. A total of 19 of the 27 countries are dubbed “mega-countries” in relation with the adoption by land area of com-mercial biotech crops, which have at least 50,000 hectares or more of farm lands planted with GM maize, cotton, cano-la, sugar beet, alfalfa, papaya, squash, or soybean.ISAAA’s report cited the future prospects of bio-
tech crops. “In the scientic
community associated with  biotechnology, there is cau-tious optimism that biotech crops, including both staple and orphan crops, will be increasingly adopted by society, particularly by the developing countries, where the task of feeding its own  people is formidable, given that the global population, most of whom will be in the South, will exceed 10 billion  by the turn of the century in 2100,” it said. It added that yesterday’s technology can-not feed tomorrow’s world. The United States, which has adopted maize, cotton, canola, Good News Pilipinas | LOS ANGELES, 3/6/2014 -- Filipino-American composer Robert Lopez made many Filipinos proud when “Let It Go,” the song he penned for the popular Disney movie “Frozen,” won Best Original Song during the 86th Acad-emy Awards.With the recognition, the 39-year-old Lopez, who won along with wife Kristen Anderson-Lopez, joins the so-called EGOT club — an elite circle of people who have won all four major annual entertainment awards: Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony.He is the circle’s 12th and youngest member, accord-ing to reports. Lopez won a Tony in 2004 for best original score for “Avenue Q.” He also has two Daytime Emmy Awards, in 2008 and 2010, for
Fil-Am composer wins Oscar for Frozen’s Let It Go
 by Norman Bordadora, In-quirer.net | MANILA, 3/6/2014  —Affairs with 38 other women and these were just a wife’s sus- picions?Senate Minority Leader Juan Ponce Enrile on Wednesday  brushed off his wife Cristina’s allegations—made in an interview aired over national television— that he was a womanizer.
Cristina also conrmed that
her husband had carried on an affair with his former chief of staff, lawyer Jessica Lucila “Gigi” Reyes.
“Those are suspicions of a wife,” Enrile told reporters when he was asked
 By Simeon G. Silverio, Jr. Publisher & Editor San Diego Asian Journal 
The Original and first Asian Journal in America
 San Diego, California January 11, 2008
 
Page 2March 7-13, 2014 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com
and there was a slight drizzle outside.
"May bagyo dito (There is a typhoon here)," she commented.Typhoon? I muttered to myself incredulously. In the Philippines, it is not a typhoon but just a drizzle passing through.In the Philippines, typhoons, the equatorial equivalent of hurricanes, are so strong that every year they cause
massive oods both in the city and the
countryside, oftentimes sweeping away homes and drowning people. Occa-
sionally, city streets would be ooded
knee-deep that vehicles, especially the  passenger jeepneys, would not be able to pass through several areas. Com-muters would be forced to walk many kilometers to their home. Classes and work are suspended more often than not.
In the fties, when television broadcast
was not yet common, we would wait to hear the strong siren coming from a San Miguel Ice Plant across the Pasig River to know the intensity of the oncoming typhoon. The siren could be heard many kilometers away.Later on, the typhoons would be clas-
sied from signal number one to signal
number three. Signal number three would mean automatic suspension of classes. In Southern California, suspen-sion of classes due to rain is unheard of.I remember when I went to class as a
rst grader in 1954 during a typhoon.
Because only few pupils were in atten-dance, the regular lesson was suspended and our teacher asked us to draw one hundred apples instead as we await our time to be dismissed during recess pe-riod. I got excited because those were a lot of apples to draw. But I realized then that I was not that bright when I con-sumed several sheets of paper drawing the one hundred apples. The girl seated  beside me used only one sheet of paper  because she drew the apples smaller. 
Trees swaying
 Sixty-mile-per-hour winds would be common in the Philippines. Rains would last for days, with trees swaying and falling on the streets while galvanized
iron sheets that make many houses' roof-tops would ap incessantly until they
 become loose and are blown away.In the countryside, the onset of rain would force people to put bamboo  braces around their nipa hut homes as reinforcement against the expected strong winds.One of my most memorable experi-ences as a city kid was when I hap- pened to be visiting with relatives in the  province one rainy day. I was invited to  join a group of boys my age to gather
sh, crabs and frogs in the rice elds.
Under heavy rain, we would insert our hand inside the holes along the embank-
ment that surrounded the rice elds, and
more often than not, we would catch our  prey. Sometimes, we would pull out a small snake which we would frantically discard. For every opportunity, danger lurked.Sometimes, the typhoon would last for days causing a citywide brownout. We would get stuck inside our house unable to go to school or work. Because nobody could go to the marketplace, we would open our stashes of canned foods like salmon, corned beef and sardines.Another common dish during the rainy season in the Philippines are mongo beans which are easily stored for such emergency situations. Without electricity, we could not watch televi-sion and would while away our time  playing dominos, scrabble, monopoly or mahjong . But there were other unusual lessons to be learned when school was
Law Ofces of Chua Tinsay & Vega
www.ctvattys.com
by Atty. Dennis Chua
Legal Buzz 
Read Atty. Dennis Chua’s previous articles by visiting our website at www.asianjournalusa.com
(Continued from page 1)
Our Life & Times
 Read Sim Silverio’s previous articles by visiting our website at www.asianjournalusa.com
by Simeon G. Silverio Jr.
A Monthly Forum hosted by and for the Fili- pino American Community of San Diego
Rain, rain go away!
By: Dennis E. Chua, Esq.
The minor children of beneciaries
 petitioned by their US citizen parents, siblings or employers may be able to
immigrate with the principal bene-
ciaries once the priority dates of their immigrant petitions become current. However in a lot of situations, these
 principal beneciaries are not ready to
 bring their minor children with them to the United States all at the same time. The minor children are thus left behind
till the principal beneciaries are able to
adjust and establish a life for themselves in the United States. A common mistake being made by
these principal beneciaries when they
are ready to bring their minor children to the United States is that new and separate immigrant petitions are being
led by these principal beneciaries for
their minor children. This has resulted in unnecessary expenses and consider-able delays in bringing the children to the United States due to long processing times and visa availabilities. Worse, some of them may have to wait longer  because they would have aged out by the time the priority dates becomes current.
Instead of ling new and separate
 petitions for these minor children,
a request for derivative beneciary
registration should have been done
with the appropriate consular ofce
or National Visa Center. This would
have saved the principal beneciaries
unnecessary expenses by doing away
with the immigrant petition ling fees.
More importantly, it allows the principal
 beneciaries to be reunited with their
minor children for a much shorter period of time. In most situations, derivative minor children can get their immigrant visas in about four to six months from the time the request for derivative ben-
eciary registration is led with the US
Embassy.To illustrate this situation, we take the case of Maribel. Maribel was petitioned  by her US citizen mother. At the time the petition became current, Maribel was still single but she had three minor children ages 18, 15, 12. Maribel then decided to immigrate to the United States by herself as she would like to
look for work rst so that she could sup-
 port her children and get a place of her own once her children follow her to the United States. A year and a half later, Maribel is ready to bring her children over to the United States. She can now
le a Request for Derivative Beneciary
Registration with the US Embassy in Manila so that her children could get their immigrant visas.
 Atty. Dennis E. Chua is a partner in The Law Firm of Chua Tinsay and
Vega (CTV) - a full service law firm with offices in San Francisco, San
 Diego, Sacramento and Manila. The information presented in this article is  for general information only and is not, nor intended to be formal legal advice nor the formation of an attorney-client relationship. Call or e-mail CTV for an in-person or phone consultation to discuss your particular situation and/ or how their services may be retained at (415) 495-8088; (619) 955-6277; (916) 509-7280; Dchua@ctvattys.com
Minor Children May Be Able to Immigrate Faster as Derivative
Beneciaries
out.One time, when my grandfather, who was an expert gambler, visited during such weather, we caught him cheating as we played mahjong. He would just shrug his shoulder and simply explain that he did so to teach us a lesson on how to play the game well. One of the most damaging typhoons that hit the
Philippines occurred in the late fties.
There were hundreds of hastily built shanties along a river in Caloocan City
that was swept by oods drowning
hundreds of people. Dead bodies where found scattered in the area afterwards. I remember visiting a funeral parlor with dozens of caskets, with dead bodies in them. Two were distant relatives of ours.
Enterprising men
In the downtown area of the Quiapo district in Manila, some parts of the
sidewalks would be ooded. Enterpris-
ing men would put a plank of wood
across the ooded portion for people to
walk on and avoid getting wet, for a fee of ten cents each, of course.One has to be careful wading in the
ood. There are many open manholes
 beneath the murky water, causing some to fall in and fracture their legs. The steel covers of these manholes are easily stolen and sold as scrap iron.After living in the United States for years, I often miss the days and eve-nings in the Philippines when we could hear the heavy pelting of rains on our rooftops as well as the lashing sound of strong winds swaying the trees and hit-ting our closed windows. Tucked in our  blankets, it was exciting to sleep under such conditions, sensing some imminent danger in the cold air around.I got the chance to relive the same ex- perience when I visited the Philippines six years ago. I stayed in a small hotel near our house in Quezon City since our house was full of other family members visiting from abroad. I was awakened at about two in the morning by the strong winds and heavy rains outside as a very strong typhoon hit the city. Contrary to what I expected, however, I felt hot and humid inside the room. Maybe it was because I was no longer used to the weather in the country of my birth after living for years in the U.S. Another reason was the drastic change of the weather conditions worldwide since the Mount Pinatubo eruption, making the temperature a lot higher compared to the time of my youth. With no air conditioning because of the brown out, I could not sleep and enjoy the moment I was often dreaming about while in the States. Instead I went downstairs to chat with the front desk clerks and security guards. Finally, I decided to go back to my room, open the windows to let the cool air in with the spray of rain and strong winds. I just let the room get wet,  preferring to pay for the damages my act would cost (since the mighty dollar goes a long way in Philippines) rather than miss the chance of enjoying the experi-ence I had been longing for.The poem "rain, rain, go away, come again, another day," is perhaps one of the few poems my mother taught me that I would not be able to teach my children and my future grandchildren as they grow up here in the United States. Over here in Southern California where only a few inches of rains fall say about 20 days a year, rains are welcomed and even encouraged like manna falling from heaven! – AJ
(Postcript: This article was written in 2008. In 2013, the strongest typhoon in history, Yolanda, hit Central Philip- pines, killing thousands of people. In San Diego where I live, continuous rain  poured last week.)
By Michael Josh Villanueva, Rappler.com | MANILA, 3/7/2014 — Google Philippines is looking for a new country manager following the departure of  Narciso Reyes last January.
Reyes was named Google’s rst coun-
try manager for the Philippines when it launched in January 2013. He joined Google in 2012 as Philippine Head of Sales. In a statement sent to Rappler,
Google Philippines conrmed the news
saying Reyes "decided to leave Google to pursue other opportunities."On February 27, a job listing for “Country Manager, Philippines” was
 posted on Google's job site. The sales
and account management position includes managing Philippine opera-tions and overseeing the development and execution of the overall Philippine strategy.Malaysia Country Head Sajith Si-vanandan steps in temporarily. Google says, "The Philippine team will continue to focus on empowering Filipino users and businesses of all sizes." — Rappler.com
Google Philippines looking for new country manager
 
Page 3 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.comMarch 7-13, 2014
 Business
 NATIONAL CITY, CA — Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 — For 65 years, Big Ben
Market (108 E 8th St.) was a xture in
 National City, the second oldest jurisdic-tion in San Diego County, until several months ago, when it was consumed
 by a re. It would be too trite to incite
imagery of the Phoenix and too easy to point to the resiliency of a commu-nity with an obesity rate of 50 percent  — the highest in the county — to tell Big Ben’s tale. On December 16, the rebuilt locale will soft open as a newer, stronger, more enduring experience: Big Ben Specialty Market, an investment in the health of the people of National City and the South Bay. A series of grand opening events will occur the weekend of January 25.Having taken different forms over the years, but always striving to meet the needs of those it serves, Big Ben Spe-cialty Market will be a linking force for
local farmers, shermen and National
City residents and South Bay commut-ers — a specialty market and education center providing locally grown, pesti-cide-free produce and other unprocessed foods; fresh, from-scratch meals to-go, color coded by gluten-free, dairy-free,  paleo and otherwise. Big Ben Specialty Market will also carry a notable selec-tion of craft beers and wine.“Every community deserves to have fresh, locally-grown food available to them. Being healthy shouldn’t be a  privilege, but rather a basic need that community leaders help meet when they recognize their constituents need help,” said owner Nick Salem, whose ever-deepening commitment to the people
of National City is exemplied in his
investment in local services, infrastruc-ture, children and more. “As a business owner, it’s my duty to ensure my market is doing just that.”In addition to the market, Big Ben will be home to Grill House at Big Ben, an open-air restaurant and exhibition kitchen serving meats fresh off the
smoker, fresh sh, whole grains, crisp
vegetables and more. At the end of their meal, guests will receive recipe cards so they can shop the market and make their meal at home. Grill House at Big Ben will offer affordable lunch and dinner options.“We’re providing the community with the ingredients to eat and live well, whether they have the time to cook or not” said Salem. “I love National City and I’m invested in its future.”A grab’n go section of the restaurant, serviceable from the market, will feature smoked brisket, ribs, lasagnas, pastas and more. Local chefs will demonstrate
Recently Destroyed 65 Year-Old Market in National City Reopens a New, Improved Version of Itself
LEONIDA T DORIA REALTY AND MORTGAGE, INC. OFFICE RELOCATION
 Lee Doria, broker, president and CEO of Leonida T. Doria Realty and Mortgage, Inc. has
announced the relocation of company’s office from 6755 Mira Mesa Blvd. #216B, San
 Diego, CA 92121 to 9809 Mira Mesa Blvd, San Diego, CA 92131 (corner of Freeway 15 and Mira Mesa Blvd). A big name sign is installed along Mira Mesa Blvd, can’t miss. The company has two owners: Lee Doria, CPA and broker, and Raul Pantaleon, a broker, Vice  President and CFO. Lee Doria has been in real estate since 1983 and Raul Pantaleon since 1979, so have
combined real estate experience of 66 years. Lee maintains her CPA office at 7603 Goode
Street, San Diego, CA 92139. Lee could be reached at 619-708-1618, Raul and
 Lee at office phones (858)693-1618, (fax) (858)693-1614,.
To all our clients and prospective clients, we deeply appreciate using our services.Grand opening to follow.
how to prepare fresh, healthy meals at home, helping people improve their eating habits. Enhancing the experience of simply dining on a delectable meal at Grill House, guests will receive recipe cards for what they ate, so they can shop the store for the ingredients and replicate the recipe at home. No more dreading that weekly shop- ping trip. Big Ben will not only improve the way people shop, but also the way they live.
About Big Ben Specialty Market
Owner Nick Salem and his family own seven different markets across San Diego including the successful Carnival Carnival Group, a series of supermar-kets in San Diego County. Big Ben was
his rst market, purchased 15 years ago,  but has been a National City xture for
65 years. It’s taken different forms, from a neighborhood market to a Mexican market and, now, a specialty foods mar-ket, featuring locally grown produce and other products, meals to go and Grill House at Big Ben, an outdoor restaurant  — all created with the commitment to improving the health of the people of  National City and the South Bay.###The board of directors of Balboa
Park Celebration, Inc., the non-prot
group charged with organizing the 2015 Centennial Celebration, voted today to transfer to the City of San Diego all authority for organizing the event in Balboa Park.The action will give the Centennial a fresh start under Mayor Kevin Faulconer and Council President Todd Gloria, and allow it to succeed under their leader-ship.The board additionally took steps nec-essary to wind-down its operations and to dissolve its corporate status, with the intent of transferring all of its records, intellectual property and applicable
nancial assets to the City.
In a statement posted on the BPCI website, balboapark2015.org, co-chairs Ben and Nikki Clay, said the decision
reected the organization’s “long and
careful consideration” of the obligations under its Memorandum of Understand-ing with the City to organize a year-long
celebration of global signicance that
would boost the regional economy and generate hundreds of thousands of room nights in local hotels.“Based upon that direction and with community input, BPCI developed plans for such an event, determined that it would cost tens of millions of dollars to accomplish, and sought corporate
sponsors and private donations sufcient
to do the job. We are grateful for the sponsors and donors who have made
nancial commitments, but there is
not adequate private funding needed to carry out that program as envisioned,” the Clays said.Today’s action culminates months of conversation between BPCI and City leaders, during which BPCI presented scaled-down goals and program plans to
reect its projected funding.Last week, City ofcials informed
BPCI of their desire to take back the Celebration and put it under control
of the City’s Ofce of Special Events.
Transition discussions began soon after.“All involved believe this action is in the best interests of the Centen-nial Celebration and Balboa Park,” the Clays said. “The Centennial remains an important opportunity for our region. We want it to receive a fresh start under the leadership of Mayor Faulconer, and will do everything in our power to help him.”BPCI board actions Tuesday included:Authorizing the co-chairs to notify the City of San Diego of BPCI’s intent to terminate its Memorandum of Under-standing by mutual agreement Authorizing the Executive Committee to retain legal counsel to advise it on the legal requirements for the voluntary dissolution of the Corporation Authorizing the Executive Committee to terminate BPCI’s contract with the San Diego Tourism Marketing District on mutually agreeable termsDelegating to the Executive Com-mittee responsibility for overseeing the wind-up of activities; termination of contracts; payments of all debts and obligations; and the transfer to the City
of San Diego Ofce of Special Events all documents identied below:All nancial reports, nancial state-ments and nancial documents, includ-
ing contracts, invoices, and copies of checksCorporate documents, including copies of all agendas, attachments and minutes for the Board of Directors and Executive, Finance and Audit Commit-teesProgramming and planning docu-ments, including CAD maps of Balboa Park, prepared for BPCI by its vendors and contractorsOwnership and content for BPCI’s social media sites, trademarks and logoSponsorship funding agreements and  presentation materialsTMD applications, reports and cor-respondence All marketing and outreach documents and reports prepared for BPCI Other items in BPCI’s possession and control requested by the City of San
Diego’s Ofce of Special Events
In addition, the Board approved entering into a three-month contract
with Gerry Braun of Gerry Braun & As-
sociates to act as its transition director, reporting to the Executive Committee, which consists of Ben Clay, Nikki Clay, Denise Carabet, Nancy Chase, Andy Fichthorn, Patti Roscoe and Stephen Russell.Among the goals of the transition, Braun said, are the protection of BPCI assets for their transfer to the City, in support of the Centennial Celebration; honoring its relationships with commu-nity programming partners; and support-ing Mayor Faulconer and his team to ensure that the Centennial Celebration is an event worthy of San Diego.
City will take over Balboa Park Celebration plan-ning; 2015 Centennial event to get “fresh start”

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