Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Credentials of Christianity.

The Credentials of Christianity.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1|Likes:
Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY GEORGE HODGES

" The blind receive their sight, and the lame
walk, the lepers are cleansed, and the deaf hear,
the dead are raised np, and the poor have the
gospel preached to them."
BY GEORGE HODGES

" The blind receive their sight, and the lame
walk, the lepers are cleansed, and the deaf hear,
the dead are raised np, and the poor have the
gospel preached to them."

More info:

Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Mar 09, 2014
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/09/2014

pdf

text

original

 
THE CREDENTIALS OF CHRISTIANITY. BY GEORGE HODGES " The blind receive their sight, and the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed, and the deaf hear, the dead are raised np, and the poor have the gospel preached to them." Jesns, when he said that, stood face to face with two of the worst miseries of humanity — mis-ery of mind and misery of body. On the one hand was a gronp of men who had asked a qnes-tion, "Art thou he that should come," they wanted to know, "or do we look for another T" You see how that question touches the heart of Christianity. The supreme fact that differences Christiatiity from all the other religions of his-tory is the fact of the life and character of Jesus. The essential Etssertion of Christianity is the as-sertion that Jesus of Nazareth is indeed he that should come, and that we need look for no other. That question set a doubt upon the central article of the Christian creed. These men were nn-beUevers.
1
 
r.bv Google 2 THE CKEDENTIAIS OP CHBISTIAinTT. On the other hand was a considerable com-pany of people, some blind, Bome lame, some lepers, some deaf, some mourning the dead, and all of them, probably, poor. These people repre-sented pain and poverty. We have no greater problems in the world to-day than the problem of doubt and the problem of poverty. These two great qnestions, like the enigma of the Sphinx, demand solution. And we must somehow answer them, or pay the fearful penalty. Doubt threatens the Church, poverty threatens the State. Jesus Christ stood face to face with both these problems, and answered them in the words that I have quoted. The unbelief, in this instance, eajne from John the Baptist. These doubters were messengers of his, and that great question was his qnestion.
2
 
Even the forerunner had fallen from the faith. Much of this unbehef of John's was due, no doubt, to physical conditioua John was in prison. He was shut up in a black fortress of Herod's, over in Moab, on the borders of the Dead Sea. That imprisonment itself, John felt naturally enough, meant the real end of all his work. Those great walls which shut out the sun and the sky stood straight aeross the path of the prophet's future. Thns far was he to go, and no farther. Jesus was to increase, and he was to decrease — r.bv Google THE CBSDENTIALS OF CHRISTLUnTY. 3 Jolin had already accepted that, Bnt tliU meant failnre. It seemed, no doubt, to John, as it seemed in the old days to Elijah, that his life had been in vain. And he wondered, perhaps, if it had not been a tragic mistake even from the
3

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->