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03-14-13

03-14-13

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Published by: The University Daily Kansan on Mar 10, 2014
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 Volume 125 Issue 89
kansan.com
 Thursday, March 14, 2013
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS XXCROSSWORD XXCRYPTOQUIPS XXOPINION XXSPORTS XXSUDOKU XX
Mostly sunny. Zero percent chance of precipitation. Wind SSE at 9 mph.
Pack your sunscreen in your spring break bag.
IndexDon’t forgetToday’s Weather
Has Spring sprung?
HI: 65LO: 54
Read more about the Big 12 Tournament on PAGE 1B
4A
pg.
OPINION
THE MORNING BREW
EXCESS HOLLYWOODLIQUORLAWSBASEBALL REWINDFURRY FRIENDS
3B
pg.
7B1B5A2A
pg.pg.pg.pg.
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
AAA  AAAA A A A AA A A  A LAA AAL A  A  A ALAA
12710368954
 
PAGE 2A
THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 2013
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
weather,
 Jay?
Partly cloudy. 10 percent chance of precipitation. Wind W at 12 mph.
Friday
 A warm start to spring break!
HI: 78LO: 40
Mostly cloudy. 10 percent chance of precipitation. Wind NE at 16 mph.
Saturday
Jayhawks are shining!
HI: 48LO: 35
Showers. 40 percent chance of precipitation. Wind at 11 mph.
Sunday
Don’t forget your umbrella.
HI: 49LO: 39
Wunderground.com
 What’s the
CALENDAR
Sunday, March 17Friday, March 15Saturday, March 16Thursday, March 14
WHAT:
 Tea at Three
WHERE:
Kansas Union, 4th floor lobby
WHEN:
3 to 4 p.m.
ABOUT:
The free tea and cookies are fit for the Queen, compliments of SUA.
WHAT:
Pi Day Celebration
WHERE:
Theatre Lawrence
WHEN:
 7 p.m.
ABOUT:
The Alferd Packer Memorial String Band hosts this event which combines math, science, pie and nerdy camaraderie. Tickets are $3.14 to $10.
WHAT:
 The Goldenberg Duo
WHERE:
Spencer Museum of Art
WHEN:
 12 to 1 p.m.
ABOUT:
Distinguished musical siblings Susan and William Goldenberg will give a free recital at the Spencer. Expect classical selections from Edvard Grieg and Beethoven, as well as Chinese folk songs and kiezmer music.
WHAT:
 TGIF
WHERE:
 Adams Alumni Center
WHEN:
4 to 5:30 p.m.
ABOUT:
 University faculty and staff are invited to this monthly event. Enjoy free soft drinks, light hors d’oeuvres and specially priced beer and wine while mingling with campus colleagues.
WHAT:
Big 12 tournament championship
WHERE:
Sprint Center
WHEN:
5 p.m.
ABOUT:
 Let’s cross our fingers and hope our beloved Jayhawks advance to the final round of the conference tournament.
WHAT:
 The National Hanging Out Show: A Call for Art
WHERE:
 Lawrence Percolator
WHEN
:Noon to 6 p.m.
ABOUT
: Artists are asked to contribute their works that focus on laundry hanging out to dry and the people who use them. The works will be part of a collage of vintage and current art on display.
WHAT
: Scary Larry Kansas Bike Polo
WHERE
: Edgewood Park
WHEN
: 7 p.m.
ABOUT
: Get some fresh air and try this unique sport. Mallets and balls are provided, but BYOB - bring your own bike.
Contact Us
editor@kansan.comwww.kansan.comNewsroom: (785)-766-1491Advertising: (785) 864-4358Twitter: UDK_NewsFacebook: facebook.com/thekansan
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
The University Daily Kansan is the student newspaper of the University of Kansas. The first copy is paid through the student activity fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are 50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased at the Kansan business office, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045. The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967) is published daily during the school year except Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and exams and weekly during the summer session excluding holidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are $250 plus tax. Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue.
2000 Dole Human Developement Center 1000 Sunnyside Avenue Lawrence, Kan., 66045
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check out KUJH-TV on Knology of Kansas Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what you’ve read in today’s Kansan and other news. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.KJHK is the student voice in radio. Whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll or reggae, sports or special events, KJHK 90.7 is for you.
NEWS MANAGEMENTEditor-in-chief
Hannah Wise
Managing editors
Sarah McCabeNikki Wentling
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENTBusiness manager
Elise Farrington
Sales manager
 Jacob Snider
NEWS SECTION EDITORSNews editor
Allison Kohn
Associate news editor
 Joanna Hlavacek
Sports editor
Pat Strathman
Associate sports editor
Trevor Graff
Entertainment and special sections editor
Laken Rapier
Associate entertainment and special sections editor
Kayla Banzet
Copy chiefs
Megan HinmanTaylor LewisBrian Sisk
Design chiefs
Ryan BenedickKatie Kutsko
Designers
Trey ConradSarah Jacobs
Opinion editor
Dylan Lysen
Photo editor
Ashleigh Lee
Web editor
Natalie Parker
ADVISERS
 
General manager and news adviser
Malcolm Gibson
Sales and marketing adviser
 Jon Schlitt
AmeriCorps hosts veggie lunch at ECM
As part of its national week of celebration, the philanthropic group AmeriCorps is hosting the weekly veggie luncheon at the Ecumenical Campus Ministries building, 1204 Oread Ave., today from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The luncheon is designed to provide attendees with a glimpse of what Douglas County’s AmeriCorps branch does and how prospective members can get involved.AmeriCorps, described by Lori Johns, director of volunteer engagement for United Way of Douglas County, is a “domestic peace corps” that is devoted to ameliorating community welfare across the nation.This AmeriCorps group is focused on the health and wellness of Douglas County residents specifically.“We have clients around the county that we work with as home coaches to provide them adequate health care,”  Johns said. “We also work quite a bit with residents who want to lose weight and elderly residents who require more personal care, and we do this through 12 to 13 local health agencies.”In tandem with the luncheon is a one-day new diaper drive designed for impoverished young families in Lawrence. “There’s a real need in a lot of these community shelters and health centers for diapers,” Johns said. “We’re working with the Lawrence Community Shelter to provide diapers for families who can’t afford them.” Johns highlights the immediate need one donated bag of diapers satisfies for homeless and underserved Lawrence families. Those interested in helping are encouraged to drop off diaper bags at the ECM during the luncheon, at the Douglas County United Way office, at the Heartland Community Health Center or at the Lawrence Community Health Center.The Hy-Vee at 6th Street and Monterey Way will also be accepting donations on Friday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.
— Reid Eggleston 
Alcohol sales may be expanded, according to a proposed Kansas bill currently being reviewed by a House committee.House Bill 2206 would expand grocery and convenience stores’ rights to sell alcohol. Currently, grocery and convenience stores are only allowed to sell up to 3.2 percent alcohol beer and wine while retail liquor stores can sell full-strength beer, wine and hard liquor.“Kansas consumers deserve the choice to decide where to purchase their alcoholic beverages as long as they’re 21 or over,” said Jody Hanson, Uncork Kansas public relations representative. “We don’t feel that that should be dictated by the government. We don’t feel like liquor stores really deserve to be protected by the government.”Uncork Kansas, the coalition seeking HB 2206 stresses that pre- venting grocery and convenience stores from selling alcohol goes against the basic tenets of a free market enterprise.“It’s really big business trying to come in and put their foot down,” said Brenton Bartz, the general manager at Mass Beverage.The issue, Bartz says, is a ques-tion of big versus local business. While liquor stores like Mass Beverage are locally owned, the grocery and convenience stores that Bartz would be competing with if this bill is approved would be national corporations.“I don’t just pay my employees who are local people, I also employ local HVAC people, local main-tenance people and local accoun-tants,” Bartz said. “I spread money to other local businesses whereas Kroger and Walmart have giant corporations to take care of that.”The ability to sell liquor, says Hanson, could help struggling, rural, mom-and-pop grocery and convenience stores keep afloat. A grocery store closing in rural Kansas creates a food desert where people have to drive 15 to 20 miles to get fresh food. Furthermore, Hanson argues, larger corporations create jobs by hiring more local employees.“Regardless of where a company is based or how big it is, if it oper-ates in Kansas, these companies have to pay all types of taxes to the state -- real estate taxes, pay-roll taxes, personal property taxes -- and the bigger the company, the more these taxes are paid,” Hanson said.Bartz is concerned that an 18-year-old checkout clerk at a con- venience store at 2 a.m. will not be as diligent at preventing underage purchase of alcohol as his employ-ees. All Mass Beverage employees must be at least 21-years-old and are specially trained to identify cus-tomers.Regulating restricted products, Hanson said, isn’t a new challenge that grocery and convenience stores would have to negotiate, since they already sell 3.2 percent beer, wine coolers, cigarettes, tobacco prod-ucts and pharmaceuticals.“They already have the knowl-edge, infrastructure, training and technology to regulate restricted products so it’s not going to be a big jump for them to take on the beer and the wine because they’re already doing it successfully,” Hanson said.In order to survive with Walmart and other grocery and convenience stores as competitors, Bartz said that Mass Beverage would have to rework its business model. After a transitional period, the liquor store would adapt into a specialty store, allowed to sell corkscrews, mixers, cups and ice.While amendments to the bill are currently being reviewed and introduced, if approved by the House Committee on Commerce, Labor and Economic Development, House Bill 2206 could be voted on by the full House next week.
— Edited by Elise Reuter 
CAMPUSSENATESTATE
EMILY DONOVAN
edonovan@kansan.com 
Senate approves annual fee review
The Student Senate Finance Committee passed 18 bills last night during their meeting.
BILLS PASSED: 
• A Bill to Fund the Interna
-tional Family Association Magazine at $1,350
• A Bill to Fund United Students
Against Sweatshops KU at $230
• A Bill to Fund Easing the Bird’n
5K at $230 A Bill to Fund This Is What Privilege Looks Like at $580
• A Bill to Fund Graduate Associa
-tion of German Students at $290
• A Bill to Fund the Non Traditional
Student Organization at $430
• A Bill to Fund the African
Student Association Event Sisimuka at $2,038
• A Bill to Fund the South Asian
Student Association Event Jayhawk  Jhalak at $1,165
 • A Bill to Fund the International
Student Association Event Interna-tional Awareness Week at $1,454
• A Bill to Fund the KU Graduate
Students for Anthropology at $1,000
• A Bill to Fund SPIC-MACAY at
$1,375
• A Bill to Fund “The Hill” at $230• A Bill to Fund American Society
of Civil Engineers (ASCE) at $480
• A Bill to Fund First Nations
Student Association at $2,500
• A Bill to Fund Earth Week by KU
Environs at $3,322
• A Bill to Implement the Student
Fee Review Subcommittees Recom-mendations ***
• A Bill to Fund the FY14 and FY15
Block Allocations
• A Bill to Fund the FY14 Line-Item
Budget The bill to implement the student fee review subcommittees recom-mendations increased student fees for each student 55 cents per year, equaling $444.55. This was a less than one percent increase in overall fees.
— Hannah Barling 
Bill could expand grocery store alcohol sales 
�       �� �       ��
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Buster might only have three legs, but scaling fences, chasing squirrels, and going for walks are still a part of his daily life.Buster has been a part of Kelly O’Neill’s family for 11 years. O’Neill, a sophomore from Leawood, took Buster in September when his older brother, who had been taking care of Buster, graduated and moved to California for work. O’Neill had to adjust his life to include taking care of Buster every day.“I’ve got another life to take care of,” O’Neill said. “I have to make sure he’s healthy, well fed, he gets enough exercise and gets groomed.”O’Neill is one of many students who owns a pet while in college, and the added responsibilities of caring for pets while in school might be something students should consider before adopting a pet.On top of regular student expens-es like rent, tuition, books and food, O’Neill has to devote some of his money to Buster. Veterinarian bills especially have put a large hole in O’Neill’s pocket.“Food costs $15-20 a month. He has medicine for his joints that costs about $200 a year,” O’Neill said. “His most recent vet bill was $50, and his yearly vet totals can come up to $150-$200.”All these expenses can add up over time, but these costs do not include emergencies. In October of 2011, Buster dislocated his hip and that vet bill alone added up to $1,000.Dori Villalon, Executive Director of the Lawrence Humane Society, says that before adopting a pet and taking on the additional expenses, students should consider fostering an animal.“If you’re adopting simply because you miss your cat or dog back home, consider volunteering instead,” Villalon said. “We need foster homes for cats and dogs (we pay for all food, medical care and supplies) and have a great dog walking program where you can take shelter dogs for the day to hike or just hang out.”The Lawrence Humane Society, a popular place where students go to adopt pets, recently completed kennel repairs for dogs available for adoption. Thirty-nine local vol-unteers stepped up and fostered the dogs while construction was underway.“Thanks to our community, the repairs went smoothly and were completed on schedule,” said Villalon.The Humane Society is current-ly gearing up for spring, and the increase in kittens and other new-born animals that come with the season. Villalon says the Humane Society will be tackling this spring and summer’s animal increases by participating in a nationwide chal-lenge.“The Lawrence Humane Society is one of just 50 shelters nation-wide selected to participate in the ASPCA Rachel Ray $100K Challenge,” Villalon said. “We have set a goal to save 122 percent more animals this summer than last year.”Part of achieving that goal means the Humane Society will have to undertake the task of find-ing homes for their adult animals who have been in the Society for some time, as well as the more desirable newborns.The Humane Society doesn’t reject applicants because they are currently a college student, but Villalon offers advice to students looking to adopt a pet.“We want them to consider that adopting a pet will limit where they live and their ability to travel or go on vacation—important consider-ations while in college,” Villalon said. Despite the travel hindrances animals might bring to students who have to move, Villalon says the Humane Society does not see the animals they adopt out to stu-dents come back after a year or two.“‘Moving’ and ‘landlord won’t allow’ continue to be top reasons why animals are relinquished to the Society, but college students don’t relinquish animals at a higher rate than anyone else and despite the myth, we don’t see an increase in abandoned animals at the end of semesters,” Villalon said.O’Neill says that Buster has increased his daily responsibilities, but coming home after a long day of classes to a smiling, happy dog is worth it. As he looks for a home to rent for next year, one of his top questions for landlords will be, “Is it pet friendly?”Villalon stresses that if you are currently looking to get a pet, you should consider adoption from the Humane Society. “If you are ready for pet owner-ship, please adopt, don’t purchase a cat, dog, rabbit or ‘pocket pet,’” Villalon said. “Lawrence Humane Society animals are already spayed/neutered, vaccinated, and micro-chipped and you’ll be helping us save a life.”
— Edited by Tyler Conover 
A 26-year-old male was ar-rested yesterday at the intersec-tion of 23rd Street and Louisi-ana on suspicion of operating a vehicle under the influence. A $500 bond was paid.A 33-year-old female was arrested Tuesday on the 1600 block of 7th Street on suspicion of operating a vehicle under the influence. A $500 bond was paid.A 29-year-old female was arrested Tuesday on the 2500 block of 9th Street on suspicion of failure to appear in municipal court. A $1,225 bond was paid.A 28-year-old male was ar-rested Tuesday on the 3600 block of 25th Street on suspicion of failure in an out-of-county court. A $1,500 bond was paid.
— Emily Donovan 
PAGE 3ATHE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 2013
On Monday it will have been 44 years since classes were cancelled so that students might see Robert F. Kennedy speak at Allen Fieldhouse. He opened his presidential campaign on KU’s campus, and was tragically assassinated just weeks later.
POLICE REPORTS
Adopting pets can be helpful, time-consuming 
PUPPY LOVE
JENNA JAKOWATZ
 jjakowatz@kansan.com 
ASHLEIGH LEE/KANSAN
Owning a pet in college can have its pros and cons. Having a pet can instill respon-sibility and other life lessons. Cons can be that owning a pet is costly.
Follow @UDK_News on Twitter 

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