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Man is Born Unto Trouble

Man is Born Unto Trouble

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY HENRY HAWKINS

JOB, V. 7.

Man is born unto trouble as the sparks fly upward.
BY HENRY HAWKINS

JOB, V. 7.

Man is born unto trouble as the sparks fly upward.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Mar 18, 2014
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03/18/2014

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MAN IS BORN UNTO TROUBLEBY HENRY HAWKINS
JOB, V. 7. Man is born unto trouble as the sparks fly upward. We need not stop to inquire whether tlie original word be rightly rendered "trouble," or whether it should have been simply " la-bour ;" but as trouble implies a greater de-gree of suffering than mere labour, we will assume it for granted, that the sense, given, in the above passage, is correct. And before any one takes upon himself to condemn his hard fate, it may be rea-sonable that he should ask, whether, ac-cording to the constitution of the human mind, and to what is passing every day be-fore us, we have any reason to suspect that man's happiness, either that of individuals or of society at large, would be increased by the total absence of all *' trouble;" that is
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to say, for instance, that man had no one for whose well-being he felt anxious, no c6 36 SERMON ET VII. father, no mother, no brother, no sister, nor wife, nor children, nor friend ; that he had, ill his own pursuits, no care, no la-bour; that certain and infinite success at-tended him in liis vocation; that the book of all knowledge were open to his compre-hension, without the toil of study; and that, in other things, he had only to feel the wish to possess, and full possession would be im-mediately consequent. Yet, with all this, we will venture to say, man would not be happy ; and those who suppose the contrary, do not know the de-light that arises from the hopes which can only exist in the previous supposition that
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there are fears which animate the human mind to the best and noblest exertions ; our success in which, we afterwards con-template with increased satisfaction, from the consciousness that we were, in some measure, instrumental in the attaining it. Let us observe those placed in the most certain slate of success and prospe-rity, whase lives wear the least appearance of difficulty or of trouble, and wiio, as far as lunnan sight can penetrate, seem fixijd SERMONET VII, 37 in immovable prosperity ; are they, gene-rally speaking, wiser or better than the rest of the world? or, which is more to our pre-sent purpose, are they happier? or are they more beloved or more esteemed? They may indeed have more of the homage of the world; but that is no proof of their possessing
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