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The Peace of Christ and the Peace of the World

The Peace of Christ and the Peace of the World

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Published by glennpease
BY FENTON JOHN ANTHONY HORT

"These things I have spoken unto you that in me ye might have
peace."— xvi. 33.
BY FENTON JOHN ANTHONY HORT

"These things I have spoken unto you that in me ye might have
peace."— xvi. 33.

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Published by: glennpease on Mar 18, 2014
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03/18/2014

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THE PEACE OF CHRIST AND THE PEACE OF THE WORLD BY FENTON JOHN ANTHONY HORT "These things I have spoken unto you that in me ye might have peace."— xvi. 33. The last words of the text are those which dwell most in our minds. But if we wish to understand the sense in which the Lord Himself meant them, we must begin at the beginning. " These things I have spoken unto you," He said. What then were " these things " ? They were His last discourse on earth, that long conversation, or address (one hardly knows which to call it), occupy-ing four well-known chapters of St. John which followed the Last Supper. In the next chapter, Christ no longer speaks to men, but to God: it is His last prayer and communing with the Father about the work that had been given Him to do. Here in the text we have the close of His teaching to the disciples. He had already been rejected by the world, and ceased to speak to the world. All
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144 'THE PEACE OF CHRIST AND through that evening thus far He was withdrawn from the crowds in the country or the city, and alone in private with those few who had been follow-ing Him as their Master and Lord. What He said on such an occasion could not be quite like His common preachings. There must be wocds fit to be spoken in the ears of Apostles, which it would have been worse than useless to have proclaimed aloud in the temple or on the mountain. It is to these most sacred outpourings of His heart to those who loved Him best that He refers, when He says they were spoken, in order that peace might be had in Him. But the words spoken to the twelve or the eleven were not meant for them alone. They were to form part of the message to be declared hereafter to all people. They are recorded in our Bibles and read in our churches to whoever is willing to hear them, though they are addressed specially to those in every age who as Christians are disciples of His, learners from Him. And one great reason why they are meant for the hearing of all is because they bind together and give life and meaning to all the other discourses of Christ which we read elsewhere, spoken
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to people of all kinds, to those who rejected Him as well as those who believed in Him, to those who hated Him as well as those who loved Him. Every lesson of the Sermon on the Mount, every parable will come out to us in clearer light when we remem-ber that they were uttered by the same lips which bid the disciples' hearts not be troubled or afraid. Considered in this way the text becomes of more interest to us than any single verse could be for its I THE PEACE OF THE WORLD 145 own sake. We are naturally led to ask what is that
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