Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Granny Storm Crow's List Jan 2014 Conditions

Granny Storm Crow's List Jan 2014 Conditions

Ratings: (0)|Views: 32 |Likes:
Granny Storm Crow's List - January 2014
CONDITIONS and RELATED ARTICLES
Granny Storm Crow's List - January 2014
CONDITIONS and RELATED ARTICLES

More info:

Published by: ElectroPig Von FökkenGrüüven on Mar 21, 2014
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/30/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Granny Storm Crow's List - January 2014
My Goodness! How my List has grown over the last few months! And there have been some rather unexpected new
“branchings”
 in the List recently. Acetaminophen, black tea, flax, echinacea, and magnolias? How did they manage to sneak into my list on cannabis, cannabinoids, and the endocannabinoid system? The answer is simple, the plants all contain compounds that interact with receptors in the endocannabinoid system. Science has discovered that cannabinoids are, indeed, made by other  plants. So far, none of them cause the same dramatic psychoactive CB1 receptor reaction (the high) as THC. They seem to be mostly limited to the CB2 receptors (no high, just healing). Acetaminophen, on the other hand, is transformed by your body into a compound called AM-404, which blocks the break-down of anandamide, yo
ur body’s own version of THC. Just
l
ike THC, anandamide makes you “feel good” and decreases pain. Blocking the break 
-down of the fragile anandamide by AM-404 results in more anandamide being in your body, relieving your pain. The acetaminophen, itself, does nothing to relieve your pain! As much as I would like it to be, cannabis is not 100% safe- nothing is! There is something you need to understand about the endocannabinoid system- it is a system of checks and balances. The amounts of endocannabinoids vary
according to the body’s needs
. As an example, during
a woman’s ovulation, her 
 anandamide levels spike, then drop drastically for the implantation of the egg. THC during ovulation would have little effect, but just days later, THC might interfere with implantation. Women trying to get pregnant should avoid cannabis. Teens under the age of 16 should not be using cannabis unless there is a medical reason. The adole
scent brain undergoes a “rewiring job” and the endocannabinoid system is right in the middle of things. The fear is that THC will cause “misconnections” resulting in subtle
 personality changes or neurosis. Like alcohol, cannabis should normally be reserved for adults. Likewise, cancer is not just one disease, which is why one treatment does not work on all types of cancer. Most cancers appear to be slowed by THC, but there are a few rare exceptions. When exposed to THC or similar synthetics, A549 lung cancer cells start reproducing, while exposure to CBD slows them down*. The
usual “high THC”
RSO could be a disaster for a small minority of cancer patients. We need
more research, but that can’t happen without legalization!
Our government has lied to us about the effects of cannabis for over seven decades. They have blocked virtually all research into cannabis and how it heals. They have ranked a never-fatal herbal medicine with the most deadly kinds of drugs, against all scientific evidence! Yet, somehow, that inconvenient truth keeps coming out - cannabis heals! It is time that we, as a nation, demand that the truth be openly acknowledged and research into this amazing plant
 begun! As my Grandfather said, “If the truth won’t do, then something is wrong”
! *
 Critical appraisal of the potential use of cannabinoids in cancer management. (link to PDF
 – 
 
Granny Storm Crow's List - January 2014
CONDITIONS and RELATED ARTICLES
* = older studies in Pre-2000 List.
It Is Time for Marijuana to Be Reclassified as Something Other Than a Schedule I Drug! (article - 2005)
ACETAMINOPHEN/ PARACETAMOL
- changes into AM- 404, stopping anandamide break-down
Conversion of acetaminophen to the bioactive N-acylphenolamine AM404 via fatty acid amide hydrolase-dependent arachidonic acid conjugation in the nervous system. (full
 – 
 2005)
 The analgesic activity of paracetamol is prevented by the blockade of cannabinoid CB1 receptors (abst
 – 
 2005)
The analgesic activity of paracetamol is prevented by the blockade of cannabinoid CB1 receptors. (abst
 – 
 2005)
 Paracetamol: New Vistas of an Old Drug (full
 – 
 2006)
The local antinociceptive effects of paracetamol in neuropathic pain are mediated by cannabinoid receptors (abst
 – 
 2007)
 Pro-drugs for indirect cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. (abst
 – 
 2008)
 Endocannabinoid and serotonergic systems are needed for acetaminophen-induced analgesia. (abst
 – 
 2008)
 Endocannabinoids mediate anxiolytic-like effect of acetaminophen via CB1 receptors. (abst
 – 
 2009)
Cannabinoid receptor-mediated antinociception with acetaminophen drug combinations in rats with neuropathic spinal cord injury pain. (full
 – 
 2010)
 
Can autism be triggered by acetaminophen activation of the endocannabinoid system? (link to PDF
 – 
 2010)
 Paracetamol-induced hypothermia is independent of cannabinoids and transient receptor  potential vanilloid-1 and is not mediated by AM404. (full
 – 
 2011)
Acetaminophen inhibits status epilepticus in cultured hippocampal neurons. (full
 – 
 2011)
 TRPA1 mediates spinal antinociception induced by acetaminophen and the cannabinoid
Δ9
-tetrahydrocannabiorcol (abst
 – 
 2011)
 Acetaminophen differentially enhances social behavior and cortical cannabinoid levels in inbred mice. (full
 – 
 2012)
 Acetaminophen, pesticide, and diethylhexyl phthalate metabolites, anandamide, and fatty acids in deciduous molars: potential biomarkers of perinatal exposure.
 
(abst
 – 
 2012)
Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase by URB597 attenuates the anxiolytic-like effect of acetaminophen in the mouse elevated plus-maze test. (abst
 – 
 2012)
Intraocular pressure-lowering effect of oral paracetamol and its in vitro corneal  penetration properties. (full
 – 
 2013)
 Blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors does not prevent the antipruritic effect of systemic paracetamol. (abst
 – 
 2014)
ACHILLES TENDINOSIS
Increased Expression of Cannabinoid CB(1) Receptors in Achilles Tendinosis. (full
 – 
 2011)
ACNE
Cannabis (Marijuana) Being Looked at For Acne Clearing Properties (news
 – 
 2007)

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->