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The Responsibility of a Man for His Influence Over Others.

The Responsibility of a Man for His Influence Over Others.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
REV. WILLIAM BRADFORD HOMER


An'D the lord said rVTO CAIN', where is ABEL THY BROTHER?
AXD HE SAID, I KVOAV NOT: AM I 3IY BROTHERS KEEPER? AXD
HE SAID, WHAT HAST THOU DONE ? THE VOICE OE THY BROTHER'S
BLOOD CRIETH UXTO ME FROM THE GROUND. Gen. 4 : 9, 10.
REV. WILLIAM BRADFORD HOMER


An'D the lord said rVTO CAIN', where is ABEL THY BROTHER?
AXD HE SAID, I KVOAV NOT: AM I 3IY BROTHERS KEEPER? AXD
HE SAID, WHAT HAST THOU DONE ? THE VOICE OE THY BROTHER'S
BLOOD CRIETH UXTO ME FROM THE GROUND. Gen. 4 : 9, 10.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Mar 23, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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THE RESPONSIBILITY OF A MAN FOR HIS IXFLUENCE OVER OTHERS. REV. WILLIAM BRADFORD HOMER An'D the lord said rVTO CAIN', where is ABEL THY BROTHER? AXD HE SAID, I KVOAV NOT: AM I 3IY BROTHERS KEEPER? AXD HE SAID, WHAT HAST THOU DONE ? THE VOICE OE THY BROTHER'S BLOOD CRIETH UXTO ME FROM THE GROUND. Gen. 4 : 9, 10. I HAVE selected this familiar passage, to lay before you some thoucrhts on the duties we owe to each other. God comes to the murderer, and demands of him an account re-specting his brother. The guilty man tries to throw off the responsibility. But he cannot escape the all-searching eve of Jehovah, or the voice that cries from the ground for ven-geance. By a very easy accommodation we can apply the passage to that account which God calls every man to render respecting the condition of his fellow-man. The text natu-rally suggests a three-fold division of the subject. I. God has a rio-ht to call men to account for the condi-tion of their fellow-creatures : ^^ Where is thy brother?" II. Men are disposed to deny this accountability, chiefly in reference to moral and religious influence : '' Am I my bro-ther* s keeper ?''
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III. God certainly will call men to account for the influ-ence they exert upon others : " What hast thou done ? the voice of thy brother's blood crieth unto me from the ground.'' I. God has a right to call men to account for the condition 21* 246 man's responsibility for others. of their fellow-creatures. To each one of us it is perfectly proper that he should come this evening with the solemn in-terrogatory, ^^ Where is thy brother ?" There is not an indi-vidual present who has not the destinies of fellow-beings in some measure committed to his trust ; who may not have been operating, by something that he has done this very day, upon others who live a thousand miles from this place, or who may not live till a thousand years from this time. I think this will be evident if we consider, First, The structure of man as a social being. We natu-rally shun solitude. The sympathies of our nature all lead
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us to fly to one another. They prompt us not only to secure our own interests, but to seek out some other being to love, and shelter, in our warm embrace, from evil. One who se-cludes himself from his fellows, and lives in the wilderness, in solitary independence of everything except the wild pro-ductions of nature, is looked upon as a moral anomaly ; and even he cannot escape the searching question, '^ Where is thy brother?" For as he tries to shut himself out from all fel-lowship, he is accountable for that very seclusion ; and he who neglects his brother may be as guilty, as he who does his brother wroncr. Society is founded upon this principle of mutual dependence. And the way we test the progress of society, is by examining how far its diflferent classes assume the position of mutual aid. The poor depend upon the rich, and the rich depend upon the poor. One branch of industry is supported by an-other. The tradesman is dependent on the youngest appren-tice whom he supplies with food and raiment. If the small-est wheel in the great system were to move irregularly, the disorder would be felt at the centre of operations ; and should the hand say to the foot, I have no need of thee, the world would stand still and refuse to stir, until harmony could be restored among the discordant members. Every man who feels conscious of having injured his neighbor, recognizes
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