Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Binder 1

Binder 1

Ratings: (0)|Views: 220 |Likes:
UDK
UDK

More info:

Published by: The University Daily Kansan on Mar 24, 2014
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/25/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Volume 126 Issue 94
kansan.com
 Monday, March 24, 2014
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2014 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 13CROSSWORD 5CRYPTOQUIPS 5OPINION 4SPORTS 14SUDOKU 5
Partly to mostly cloudy. Some clouds early will give way to clear skies.
Make an advising appointment.
IndexDon’t ForgetToday’s Weather
You know nothing, Jon Cloud.
HI: 50LO: 26
ST. LOUIS BLUES
PAGE 14
 Jayhawks fall to Cardinal in Round of 32 
GEORGE MULLINIX AND MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
STUDENT SENATE
Jayhawkers candidates prepare for election 
STUDYING: FINANCE 
Student Senate University Affairs committee chairMemorial Union Corporation voting memberPeer Leadership Consultant co-director of development at Student Involvement & Leadership CenterInto the Streets Week coordinator at Center for Community OutreachSigma Kappa sorority member
STUDYING: MARKETING AND INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 
Student Senate Multicultural Affairs chairHawks Helping Hawks marketing directorQueers and Allies social media coordinatorCommission on the Status of Women legislative affairs directorMulticultural Business Scholars Program tutor
JAYHAWKERS PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: MACKENZIE OATMAN
JAYHAWKERS VICE PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: MITCHELL COTA
EMILY DONOVAN
news@kansan.com 
TURN TO PAGE 8 FOR A BIOGRAPHY ABOUT BOTH CANDIDATES
 
NEWS MANAGEMENTEditor-in-chief
Katie Kutsko
Managing editor – production
Allison Kohn
Managing editor – digital media
Lauren Armendariz
Associate production editor
Madison Schultz
Associate digital media editor
Will Webber
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENTAdvertising director
Sean Powers
Sales manager
Kolby Botts
Digital media and sales manager
Mollie Pointer
NEWS SECTION EDITORSNews editor
Emma LeGault
Associate news editor
Duncan McHenry
Sports editor
Blake Schuster
Associate sports editor
Ben Felderstein
Entertainment editor
Christine Stanwood
Special sections editor
Dani Brady
Head copy chief
Tara Bryant
Copy chiefs
Casey HutchinsHayley JozwiakPaige Lytle
Design chiefs
Cole AnnebergTrey Conrad
Designers
Ali SelfClayton RohlmanHayden Parks
Opinion editor
Anna Wenner
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Associate photo editor
Michael Strickland
ADVISERS Media director and content strategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
 Jon Schlitt
MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014PAGE 2
CONTACT US
editor@kansan.comwww.kansan.comNewsroom: (785) 766-1491Advertising: (785) 864-4358Twitter: @KansanNewsFacebook: facebook.com/thekansanThe University Daily Kansan is the student newspaper of the University of Kansas. The first copy is paid through the student activity fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are 50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased at the Kansan business office, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045. The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967) is published daily during the school year except Friday, Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and exams and weekly during the summer session excluding holidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are $250 plus tax. Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue.
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check out KUJH-TV on Wow! of Kansas Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what you’ve read in today’s Kansan and other news. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.KJHK is the student voice in radio. Whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll or reggae, sports or special events, KJHK 90.7 is for you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center 1000 Sunnyside Avenue Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather
,
Jay?
What’s the
— weather.com 
WEDNESDAY
HI: 63LO: 44
Partly cloudy and windy.
Wind-erfell.
TUESDAY
HI: 45LO: 26
Generally sunny. Winds NNW at 10 to 20 mph.
Spring is coming.
THURSDAY
HI: 66LO: 35
Winds with showers at times.
Spring’s Landing.
Calendar
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
What:
Bold Aspirations Visitor and Lecture Series: D. Kimbrough Oller
When:
4 p.m.
Where:
 Bruckmiller Room, Adams Alumni Center
About:
 The topic is “emergence of foundations for language.” The event is free.
What:
Amandla! A Revolution in Four Part Harmony.
When:
 6:30 p.m.
Where:
Lied Center
About:
A film about music’s role in the African anti-apartheid move-ment. A discussion moderated by the Kansas African Studies Center, Elizabeth MacGonagle, will follow.
What:
An Evening with Cindy McCain
When:
7:30 p.m.
Where:
Dole Institute of Politics
About:
 Cindy McCain will speak about her experiences in philanthropy and campaigning.
What:
 The Joy of Singing — The  James Ralston Memorial Concert
When:
 7:30 p.m.
Where:
 Lied Center
About:
 Tickets are $6 for students, children and seniors, $8 for adults.
What:
In Our Time: Performance Art Event
When:
10:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.
Where:
Art and Design Building Gallery
About:
 Eli Gould’s work represents the human relationship to time, with each performance lasting the duration of 10,000 heartbeats of the performer. The event is free to the public and will continue throughout the week.
What:
An Evening with Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little
When:
7:30 to 9 p.m.
Where:
Woodruff Auditorium, Kansas Union
About:
 The Chancellor will speak and be interviewed about her career as a woman in leadership. A reception will follow.
Monday, March 24Tuesday, March 25 Wednesday, March 26 Thursday, March 27
What:
 Remembering Mandela: Legacies and Liberation Struggles
When:
3 to 4 p.m.
Where:
 Sabatini Multicultural Resource Center
About:
 A panel discussion with South African Scholars Hannah Britton, Surendra Bhana, Lorraine Haricombe and Elene Cloete.
What:
Employment Topic Workshop:  Job Search Strategies for Interna-tional Students
When:
3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Where:
149
Burge UnionAbout: Tips and strategies for international students looking for a job in the United States.
Don “Red Dog” Gardner has spent his lie working with others creating a com-munity to call his own, and at 75, he’s not done yet. Red Dog currently works or the University o Kansas as a senior ambassador, or “class checker” as he calls it. He and 15 other retired cit-izens stand outside o class-rooms to make sure that ath-letes attend class.Aside rom being a class checker, he and his wie are in charge o Red Dog’s Dog Days, a ree year-round fit-ness program open to the Lawrence community.Red Dog’s Dog Days start-ed in June 1984 as a way to prepare high school ootball players or their all season. Eventually, it grew to include the rest o the schools’ ath-letes, and even their siblings and parents. Today, nearly 30 years later, Red Dog’s Dog Days is a chance or those in Lawrence to participate in a community workout. Gardner says he enjoys see-ing the progress people make through the program. “So ar it’s still un,” Gardner said. “It’s just like athletes and playing pro ball or sing-ing or whatever. When it’s no un anymore you better get out.”Gardner’s nickname, “Red Dog,” was given to him by his seventh grade coach and gym teacher, coach Duver. Gardner said coach Duver gave nicknames to everyone and called all o the redheads “red dog.”“It never really bothered me,” he said. “I mean, does anybody like a nickname? It  just ollowed me. I couldn’t shake it.”As a child, Gardner lived in three different oster homes throughout Lawrence until he was 10 years old.“For my mother to keep me, she divorced, which was a real rarity back then, and put me in a home,” Gardner said. “One time she lived across the street, one time across the alley and another time she was just about a block away.”Gardner was able to see his mother every two weeks. He said it was important to his mom that he live and go to school in Lawrence so they could still see each other. When he saw his mom they would usually see a movie and get ice cream.“I still love ice cream,” he said.He said that not living with his mother was just a part o lie.“My line has always been [that] I wasn’t abused or mis-treated ever, but there wasn’t any love either,” Gardner said. “I eel that way because it’s not like today. I wasn’t knocked around or any-thing.”Once his mother remarried, he was able to move in with her and her new husband. “It was great because I don’t remember living with her when I was two,” he said. “It was great to just to be with her.”Gardner describes his mom as a “strong-willed, auburn lady.” He said she always had the house in order and he knew better than to talk back to her. He was thankul to be living with her again and never wanted to make her mad.From being a class checker to running Dog Days, Gard-ner creates a community ev-erywhere he goes. When Gardner was asked to be a class checker 11 years ago, it meant that he would get to be involved in sports again, at least in some way. He was a sports trainer at Lawrence High School or many years and even did  volunteer traveling with the University ootball team on and off or about 15 years.“Retired people need a part-time job or their spouses will throw them out o the house,” Gardner said. Libby Brown, a sophomore rom Wichita, has known Gardner or two years. She met him afer waiting on him at Alvamar Country Club where she worked. “He’s genuinely interested in the lives o others and actu-ally cares about you,” Brown said. “He asks questions, gets upset i you don’t say hi and enjoys making new riends. He’s a really outgoing guy.”
— Edited by Sarah Kramer 
LAWRENCE
Local creates city-wide exercise community 
CASSIDY RITTER
news@kansan.com 
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
Don “Red Dog” Gardner started Red Dog’s Dog Days nearly 30 years ago. Since its founding, Red Dog’s Dog Days has exploded into a community fitness program open to anyone in Lawrence.
 
MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014PAGE 3THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
the university 
 
of  
Collins College of Business
With a graduate degree from The University of Tulsa’s top 100 Collins College of Business.
Nationally Recognized Programs
Full-time & Part-time MBAMaster of AccountancyMS in Finance
 
Ample scholarships are available, but the deadline to apply for fall 2014 is approaching. To learn more about opportunities in TU’s Collins College of Business, visit www.utulsa.edu/collins, or call 918-631-3660.
TAKE THE NEXT STEP...
It was night in Te Gambia, a small country in West Ari-ca, and Kansas graduate Lacy Szuwalski was walking home when she noticed a strange man walking in ront o her. He kept looking back to make sure she was ollowing him, and when she stopped walking he did, too. She had seen him in town beore and he seemed to pop up unexpectedly during her time as a Peace Corps vol-unteer. Worried, she called ahead to let the guards know about the man.Te man went away, but it’s the potential or experiences like this, or worse, that can scare off prospective volun-teers.“Saety is one the biggest concerns people have when looking at the Peace Corps,” Szuwalski said.Te program, which sends Americans abroad to help communities in fields ranging rom agriculture to education, has seen a steady decline na-tionally over the last ew years. Participation dropped rom 9,095 volunteers in 2011 to 7,209 in 2013. At the Univer-sity, numbers have declined rom 47 volunteers in 2010 to 23 in 2013.Some reasons or this de-cline include saety concerns, improving job markets, a lack o awareness and increased opportunities to volunteer abroad according to Peace Corps experts.Szuwalski recently became the University’s Peace Corps Representative and is working to recruit students or the pro-gram by leading inormational events about the organization, like an upcoming Peace Corps Inormation Session – Ad-dressing Your Fears. Tis will be held on uesday, March 25 rom noon to 1 p.m. in the In-ternational Room o the Kan-sas Union.Kate Newman, a political sci-ence major rom Kansas City, Mo., considered the program but ultimately decided it wasn’t or her.“I elt that there was a lot o risk in volunteering in some o the countries, especially or women, where the respect and
University’s Peace Corps participation decreases
BRENDAN O’FARRELL
news@kansan.com 
“I felt that there was a lot of risk in volunteering in some of the countries...”KATE NEWMANStudent
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
University graduate Lacy Szuwalski poses with her host sister Bintu in The Gambia. Szuwalski is the University’s Peace Corps Representative and she is currently working on recruiting for the organization.
Addison Schiele, a sopho-more rom opeka, is a mem-ber o the Kansas debate team, the second team in the country so ar that’s qualified to head to the national debate compe-tition. Tis year’s competition will take place at the Universi-ty o Indiana. Te Kansan sat down with Schiele and asked him some questions about his experience with debate. 
The University Daily Kan-san:
ake me through the pro-cess o preparing or a debate. 
Addison Schiele:
 Gener-ally, either a week or two in advance, you scope out the competition and figure out what the other teams are read-ing and prepare arguments against those teams, both on the affirmative and negative. Online there is a case list that everybody puts all the research that they do on it, so they have all their affirmative and neg-ative arguments. I do a lot o the affirmative research or my partner and I; I do research and update the affirmative, see i there are any new articles or new advantages. Te week o [the competition], a ew days beore, you have to do your prep-sheet, you sort the judges based on how you preer them to judge you. Te judges that you want the most go at the top o the list and the judges you want the least go at the bottom and that determines who will judge you in the com-petition. 
UDK:
 What do you receive i you win the debate? 
AS:
 Tere’s a traveling trophy that goes around to the schools that you get your name put on. I think there are individual trophies; you get a watch that is pretty cool too.
UDK:
 What helped you make it to the national champion-ship? 
AS:
 I think one o the things that have really helped has been having a solid coaching staff. Dr. Harris, who is the di-rector o the debate program, is an argumentative genius in my opinion and he’s able to think about arguments in a unique manner that makes a lot o debate strategic sense. Dr. Bret Bricker is extreme-ly helpul or teaching debate style and techniques. 
UDK:
 When did you start de-bating and why? 
AS:
 I started debating resh-man year in high school to get a speech credit to graduate and I stuck with it and I liked it. It was unexpected to say the least. 
UDK:
 
What has prompted you to continue debate? 
AS:
Tere’s something about being in a debate round that is incomparable to any other lie experiences that I’ve had. It’s just a rush o adrenalin and it’s equivalent to why someone wants to play a sport or the rest o their lie. It’s a different style o competitiveness that is interesting to me, at least. 
UDK:
What will you do afer college debate ends to get that rush? 
AS:
 Unortunately there is no proessional debate so it does have to come to an end. My last debate round will proba-bly be very emotional or me and will end in some tears. Te way that I will try to ulfill that kind o rush is to keep up with debate, ollow the KU debate program. Right now I coach debate at my old high school, and coaching is it’s own kind o rush, it is just more beore the round than anything. [I will probably be] getting an assistant coaching position or something like that while I’m in grad school. 
UDK:
 What do you plan to do afer college? 
AS:
 Something to do with chemical engineering; it’s sort o unrelated to debate. 
UDK:
 How do you think your debate skills will help you in this career? 
AS:
Debate teaches you how to process inormation and make decisions incredibly quickly. It also exposes you to different kinds o literature bases that you have to re-search. It helps with school in two ways: one, it orces you to get better at reading and read-ing comprehension, and then to be able to synthesize the re-search that you do and analyti-cally think about it and process that inormation very quickly.
— Edited by Callan Reilly 
Kansas debate team qualifies for nationals 
Q&ACAMPUS
TERRI HARVEY
news@kansan.com 
SEE CORPS PAGE 8

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->