Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Hairy Wild Man (1903)

Hairy Wild Man (1903)

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1 |Likes:
Published by draculavanhelsing
Clarence & Richmond Examiner 1903 (Dec 29)
Clarence & Richmond Examiner 1903 (Dec 29)

More info:

Published by: draculavanhelsing on Mar 25, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/25/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Clarence and Richmond Examiner (Grafton, NSW : 1889 - 1915), Tuesday 29 December 1903, page 2National Library of Australiahttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article61399676
TheHairyMan.
(UyHenry
Lawson,in Tho
WeeklyScotsman. )
efts'
far
back
as
I
can
remembertherehas
beenintheBlue
Mountains
district:oi
NewSouth-AValestheyarnofthe
 Yahoo,
or
 Hairy
Man.
It.
scared
?children
coming
home
by
the
bushtracksfromschool,and
boys
out
late'
afterlost
cows-or
kangaroos
;
and
even
grown
bushmen,going
home
along
a'
lonely
track
aftersunset,wouldholdtheirbackshollow
?
andwhistle
a
tune
when
theysuddenly
,
heard
a
noise-say,
the
i
thud,thud
of
la
kangaroo
leaping
off
through
the.scrub-and
thought
ofthe
Hairy
Man.
'?
.
The
Hairy
Man
was
permanent,
and
his
country
spreadfrom
theeastern
slopes
ofthe
GreatDividing-
Range
right
outto
theends
of
the
westernspur.He
hadbeenheard
of
and
seen
and
descri-bed
so
often,
.and
by
so'many1
reliableliars,
that
 
most
peopleagreedthat
 itmustbe
something. The
most
popular
and
enduring
theory
was
that
it
was
a
gorilla
or
an
orang-outang,which
?
hadescaped,
asa
youngster,
from
a
travel-
ling
menagerie
longago,
It;was
alsosaid
to
be
a
new
kind
of
kangaroo,''
ol
thc
lastof
a
speciesof'Australianani-malswhichhadn'tbeendiscoveredand
classified,
i'
Dave
Regan,
JimBentley,and
AndyPage,bushmatcs,
hadtakena'contract
toclear
and
fence
the
ground
for
a.new
cemetery
about'-three
.
milesoutofthcthriving
township
of
Mudgee-Budgee.
Daveand
his'matescamped
in
an
olddesertedslabandbark.hut,whichhap-
pened
to
stand
on
theground.
It
was
I
a
lonely
place,in
«arkstringy-barkbush,
thenearesthouse
beingthehut
of
a
tim-ber-getterand
his
family,about
two
miles
along
thetrack
on
thcHome-Rule
side.
Í
?'?
:
Vit
was
thedaysafter
AnniversaryDay
(theanniversaryofthe
founding
of
the
colony),andDaveandJim
were
pat-
riots.Dave
andJim
were
feeling
veryrepentantandshaky.
They
badspentthe
day
at
theBuckaroo
races,
halfthenight
in
Buckaroo,
arid
theotherhalfin
Home-Rule,
where
the
early-closing
>
law
as
regarded
public-houses
was
not
so
stringent.
They
hadhad
a
good
time
;
they
hadbetted..-and'shouted(treated)away
all
theircashinhand,
as
well
as
an
advancecheque
drawn
on
the
con-
tract
;
had
run
upscores;
thcLord.knewhow
much,
at
all
the
pubs
;
:
and
had
hadseveral
rows,
and
at
leastthree
fights-they
weren't,
sure
with
whom,
that
was
thetrouble,buthad
a
drink
lurid
'
recollectionof
havinggot
off
their
horsesseveraltimes
on
thcway-home
j
tofight
eachother.
¡
Butthe
worst
of
it
was
that
they
had
Butthe
worst
of
it
was
that
they
hadbroken
tile
bottlewhichthey
were
bring-inghomelastnightfor
a
morning
re-
viver,and
hadnothing..to
 straighten
upon.
Their
nerve«,were
notin
a
fitstateto
allow
of
theirgoing
to
Mudgee
Budgec,
atthe
riskofhearing
some
new
and
awfultruths
oflast
night'sdoings,
and
they
hadn't
the
courageto
askAn-dy,
tcgo.
They
were
verycontriteandgentletowards.'himwiththeir
:
 Yes,
Andy,
and
i'No,
Andy;
and,
 No,
thankyou,
Andy,
whenhe
fried
chops
and
madecoffeefor
them.
.
The
day
be-
fore
they
hadboth
sworn
to
him-so-lemnly,
affectionately,
and,
atlast,
im-patientlyand
even
angrily-and
on
thc
graveof
all
the
faith
theyhadbrokenwithhim,,that
they
wouldn't
getdrunk,
thatthey.,
-wouldn't
bet¡
thattheywouldn't
draw
a;
penny,
on
thecontract,
that
they'd
buy
a
week'sprovisions
first
thing,
that
they'dbringthcthingshomewith
them
on
theirhorses,andthatthey'd
come
 homeearly.
And;HowIthey'dspent
his
money:
as
well
as
:
their;OWII.Í
Andy
made
no
remarks,
andask-
ed
:iib
questions¡when-they-woke
at
mid-
day
;;
and7
they>
took:
hissilence
in'<-a
chastened
spirit.
.-
Andy
Page,
wasa
patriotand
a
de-
mocrat,
too,
themostearnestof
tho
.three
;
but
'he
was
as
obstinately,
teeto-tal
as
he
was
honestand
truthful.
Dave
was
tile
head.of
the
party,
but
Andy
the
father.
Andy
had
on
severaloccasions
gone
into
town
with
Dave
and.Tim
on
pay-nights
;
to
lookafter
them,
tofightfor
thom
if
necessary,
and
togetthem
home,
if
possible,
whenthey'dhad
en-
ough.
..
Butthc
lastspree
but
one
had
dis-
gusted
Andy.
,I-Ic
swore
he'd
never
gointotown
with,themagain,and,
likemost
simple-minded,honest,
good-natur-
edfcllowSj
whoseideas
come
slowly,who
arc
slow
at
arrivingatdecisions
(and
whosedecisions
are
invariably
right),
whenhe'd
once
madeuphis
mindnothingshort
of
a
severe
shock
ofearth-
quake
could
move
him.
-
He'd
stay
at
home
on
Anniversary
Day
andwashed
and
mended
his
clothes,
and
had
.
read
andtriedto
understand-Henry
George's
 Progress
and
Poverty.
?
Dave
andJim
werestill
moping
wret-
chedly
about
thchut,
when,
towards
thc
middle
of
theafternoon,
un
angel
came
along
on
horseback..It
was
JackJonesfromJIudgcc-Budgcc,
a
drinking
mate
of
theirs,
 bush-tfclcgraph jokerandne'erdo-wellofthc
district.He
hung
up
.
his
shy,spidery
filly
under
a
shed
at
thcbackofthchut.
i
 I
thought
you
chaps
would
bcfeeling
I
shniky hesaid,. and
I've
been
feeling
as
lonelyanddismal
as
an
orphan
bandi-
coot
on
a
burnt
ridge,
so
I
thought
I'd
 
come
out.I'vo
brought
'
a
flaskof
whisky.
?
Never
were
twosouls
more
gratchtl.
Bush
matcship
is
a
grand
thing,drunk
 
Bush
matcship
is
a
grand
thing,drunk
or
so.bcr.
..
 
Andy
promptly
tookcharge
of
thewhisky,andproceeded
to
dole
itoutin
judicious
dosesat
decent
intervals..Tack,
who
was
a
sandycomplexioned
young
fellow,
withthcexpression
.
of
a
horn
humorist,had
somenews.
 Youknow
old
CorneyGeorge
?
They
hadheard
of
lum.
Ile
wasan
old
Cor-
nishman,'who
split
shinglesandpalings
iii
thcBlackRntigc,and hatted -^-that
is,
lived
alone-in
a
hut
in
a
darkgullyundertheshadow
of
DeadMan's
Gap.
 He
went
intoBuckaroo
to
thepolicestationyesterday, saidJackJones,
 In
a
very
bad
state.Ho
swore
he'd
seen
the
Hairy
Man. ThcWhattcr? Yes,the
Hairy
Mau.He
swore
thatthc
Hairy
Man
came
down
tohis
hutthenightbefore
last,just
aboutdark,and
triedto
break
in.
Ho
saidthe
Hairy
Man
stayed
aboutthohut
all
night,try-ing-to
pull
theslabs
off
thc
walls,
andgetthebark
off
tho
roof,
anddidn't
go
away
till
daylight.OldCorney,saysho
fired
athim
two
or
threetimes,
through
thecrackswithhisshotgun,buttho
Hairy
Mandidn'ttakeanynotice.Theold
chap
was
pretty
shaky
on
it.
Drink,
1s'pose;
 grunted
Dave,
con-
temptuously. No,
itwasn't
thedrink.
They
reck-oned
he'd
been'hatting'
ittoo
long.
They've
got¡him
at
the
police
station
now.
Whatdidhe
say
the'Hairy
Man
was
like,?
askedJimBentley. Oh,'theusualthing, saidJack.
 
'Bout
as;
tall
asa
man
andtwice
as
broad,
arms
nearly
as
long
as
himself,bigwide
mouth,
withgrinningteeth
and
covered
all
over
with
red
hair. ,
 Why
 
That'sjustwhat
',
my
unclesaidhe
was
like,
exclaimed
AudyPage,
I
suddenlytaking
great
interestinthe
conversation.
He
was
passing
in
with
some
firewood
tostick
under
a
pot
in
which
he
was
boiling
a
pieceofsaltbeef;
now
he
stoodstook
still
andstared
at
Jim
Bently
with
the
blankbreathlessexpression
'
of
a
man'whohadjustheardastounding
news.
 Did,.your
uncle
see
thc
HairyMan,Andy
?
V.
inquiredJackJones
feebly..'He
felt
toosickto
takemuch
interest.
 .
'.'Yes, said.
Andy,
.
staring
at.'.
Jack
withgreat
earnestness.
.
 Didn't
Itellj'ou
?
He
was
drivin'home
up
the
passto
DeadMan's
Gap,
.wherehe
lived
then,and
he'seenthe
Hairy
Manbundliu'
off
amongst
the
.rocks.1?.'?
'
Audy
'
paused
impressively
'aud
stared
at
Jack.
-
 And
what
didyouruncle
'do,'
Andy
? askedJack,with
a
jerky
little
cough.
 He
stood
upin
the
cart
and
ham-mered
into
tlie
horse,andgalloped
itallmered
into
tlie
horse,andgalloped
itall
theway
home,
full
batnptdthedoor
;
thenhe
jumpeddown,
leavingthc
cart
andhorse
standing
there,,wentinand
lay
down
on
the
.bed,
andwouldn't
speak
to
anybody
for
two
hours.
.\tiow
long
r
 
asiccu
jacK,
sun
JceDiy.
i'Twohours, said
Audy
earnestly
;
iudhe
wentin
withthefirewood.Jack
Jones
proposed
 a.
.
bit
of
a
¡troll
;
hesaid
it
would
do'them
good.
[-Ie
felt
an
irresistible
inclination
to
gig-
gle,
andwished
to
get?-out
of
thehearng
of
Andy;
whom
he
respected.
Along
thc
track
a
bitthere
wasan
,
incidentwhich
proved
the
stateof
their
nerves.
A.
big
brown
snake
whipped
across
thetrack,andinto
a
heap
ofdead
boughs.
They.
staredat
each
other
'
for
a
full
min-ute-thenJacksummonedcourage
to
ask-
.'
 
.-.'..
 Did
you
chaps
see
thatsnake? Then
it
was
all
right
;
they1put'
a
match
tothc
boughs,
:
and.stood
round
with
long
sticks
till
thesnake
came
out.
'
They
went,back
tothehut
and
man-
aged
a
cupofcoffee.
Presentlythey
got
on
to
ghost
and
Hairy
Manyarnsagain.'. That
was
God's*truth, saidJack, thatyarn
I'
told,you
aboutwhat
hap-pened
to
me
going upDead
Man's
Gap.
It
was
just
as
I
toldyou,
I
was
driv-ingslowly
upinthc
little
oldspring
cartof
mine,when
something-I
-don't
knowwhat
it
was-made
me
lookbehind,
andthere
wasa
woman,
walkingalong
be-hindthecart
withherhands
on
the
tail-
board.
It
was
just
abovetlie
spotwhere
the:
hawker'swife
was
murdered.
She
was
dressedin
black,andhadblack
hair,and1
herface
was
-deadwhite.
AtfirstI
thought
it
was
some
woman
whowanted
a
lift,
ora
chai)in
woman's
clo-thes,
playingthcghost,
so
I
pulled
up.
And,
when
I
lookedround
again
she
was
gone.
-I
thought
she'dcrouched'under
thecart
;
I
?
whipped
up'
thehorse,
and
lookedround again;but,there
was
noth-ing
there.
Then.
I
reckon
Idrove.
home
as
fast
as
Andy's
uncle
did..'
You
need-
n'tbelieve
mc
unless.you
'like. .
?
?
 Thunderstormcoming, ,
.said
Dave,
sniffing,.and
.
lookingroundthe
corner
tothecast.
?'
 I.thought this
weather
wouldbring
something,
:;
???.'.???
 My
oath; .-said
Jim,
 a
regular
old-
man
storm;
too.'.'
.:.
?..??-..,?'.'
.
.The
mighty
blueblack'
bankof
stormcloud
rose
bodily,fromthc
east,
and
was
overheadand
sweeping
down
on
.thc
sun-
setin
a.
very..few
minutes.'?.',
The
'light-
nings
blazedoutand1
swallowed.daylightas'well
as'
darkness.;
>Buf
it
was
not
a
rainstorm
;
it
was
.
thebiggest
-
hail-storm
ever
experienced
in
that
district.
Orchardsandvineyards
were
stripped,
and
many
were
ruined
round'
there.Somesaidthere
were
stones
as
big
as
hen'seggs
j
some
saidthe
storm
lasted
over
an'
hour,
some
saidmore-it.
was
probably
half
or
three-quarters
of
an
hour.
Haillay
:
feet
deep
in
the
old.
dig-
 
hour.
:
gers'
holes
for
a
fortnight
after.
Insidethc
hut,'
thc
mateshalf
expectedthc
hailto
come
through
the
roof..Just
as
thcstorm1
began
to
hold
up
a
little,
theyheardlouderpattering
out-side,and
a
bang
at.thc
door.Thcdoor
was
ofhardwoodboardswithwidecracks;
Andy
rose
toopen,
it,
but.squinted
through
a
crack
first.
'
Hesnatchedthebig
crowbar
from*thc
cor-
ner;
dug
thefoot-of
it
intotheearth
floorand
jammed
thepointedheadunder
a
cross
pieceofthe
door
;
he'
didthc
same
with
a
smaller
crowbar,
andlookedwildlyround'for
more
materialfor
a
bar-
ricade.-
-'
N
 What
arc
youdoing
?
Who
isit,
An-
dy
?
criedthe
others
on
their
feet.
 It's1
thc
Hairy
Man
I
gaspedAndy.Theygot
to
thedoor,
and
squinted
through
a
crack
inturn.
Onesquint
was
enough.
They
didn'thave
to
push
andcrowd
andsay,
 Lot's
have '
a
look1
It
was
thc.
Hairy
Man
right
enough.
It
was
about
as-
tall
as
au
ordinary
mau
I
but
seemedtwice'asbroad
across
theshoulders
;
it
hadlong
arius,and
was
covered
with
hair,face
and
nil
;
it
had
a
big,
ugly,mouth
.
anti
wildbloodshot
eyes.
They
helped
Andy
to
.
barricade
the
door.
 
There
was
another
hang
at
thcdoor,.
Acarirattletl
past,
a
woman
screamed,andthc
cartwent
on
at
a
great
rate.
There
was
a
muxzlc-loadcr
shot-gunhanging
on
the
wall,
loaded-Andy
had
leftit
loadedthc
last
timehe'dbeen
out
kangaroo
shooting,
to
save
ammunition.
Andy,
likemost
slow-thinking
men,.,of-tendid.
desperatethingssuddenly
in
a
crisis,
He
snatched
down
thegun,step-
ped
back
a
pace
or
two,
aimed
at
-
thc'
doorlow
down,
and
fired,'
Ho
doesn'tknow
?
why
heaimedlow
down-except'
that
lt
 wastoo
much
like
shooting
at
a
man.
They
heard
a
howl,andthe
thing,
whatever
it
was,
running
 
off,
They
barricadedthcdoor
more.
They
scanned'thodoorplanking,and.foundthatabout
halfthc
chargehadgonethrough.
-,
 Thc
powder
must
have
got
damp,
said
Andy.
 I'll,
put
in
a'
double
charge
to
makesure, and
he.
reloadedthogunwithtremblinghands.Theotherthree
bumped
their
heads
over
thc
.
whisky.
They
can'tsay
forcertain1
how
theygot
¡
through
that'llight,
or
what
they,
said
I
or
did.
Tho
first
idea
was
to
get
outofthere,
and
run
to'
Mudgcc-Budgcc,
but
they
were
reluctant
to
leave
theirfort,.
I
Who'dgo
out
andrcconnoltro
?
 Be-
sides,
saidJack
Jones,,
 wo'rc
.
safer
I
here,
andthething'sgone,whatever
lt
is.
Whatwould
they
think
of
us
il.we
?
went'
into
thetown
with
a
yarnabout
9
a
Hairy
Man? Hehadheardhishorse
gfl
breaking
away,
anddidn't
care
to
take
H
chased
on
lootthe?
away,
therisk
of
beingchased
on
loot
by
the?Yahoo.
,9
About
an
hourlater
they
heard
a
horse
.
ftj
gallopingpast,
and,,
looking
through
the
ft
cracks,
saw
a
boy
ridingtowardsMud-
jj
gee
Budgee.
fit's
youngFoley, saidJack. The
son
of
that'oldtimber-getter,that'sjusttaken
tip
a
selection
along
thc
road
near
Home.Rule.
*^
v'
 I
wonderwhat's
up
? said
Andy. Perhaps
tháHairy;
Man's
-
beenthere
1
We
ought
to
goalong'and
help. ''
?
 They*
can
take
care
ofthemselves,
saidJackhurriedly.;
 They're
;
closetoHome
Rule,andeau.'getplenty
of
help.
'i
The
boy
wouldn't
rideto
.
Mudgee
Bud
I
gee'ifthere
was
anythingwrong.
?j
-
The
moon
had
risen
full.
Sometwo
or
threehourslater
they
saw
Mahoney,
the
?
mountedconstable,
and
theyoung
doc-
tor
from
Buckaroo;
.
ride;
pasttowards
Home
Rule
;?.-':.::.
'.
-?..>;..,.
.i
 
.
 There's
something
up'right .enough, said
Jim'Bently.,
-
vii
Later
on-
tliçy
began
,tostareateach
jirjl
other,less
intently,and
left
;
off
jumping19
wheni
anybody
spoke,About'
daybreak
gi
Andy
was
sitting
obstinately
on
guard,SH
with'the
gun
across,
his
knees,and
thc
ff}
others
dozing
on'thcbunks
(andwaking
ijm
now
:
andthen
with
jerks),
whenCon-
«j
stable
Mahoney.
rodeup'to
.
thedoorand
m
knocked
his
businesskn.ock%
It
brought
githem-all
totheir
feet.
.
''
,-
fl
?
Andy
asked
him,
veryunnecessarily,
to
Wt
comein,,
andplaced
a
stoolforhim,
but
njhedidn't
seeit.
He
looked
.
roundthe
ffj
?
M
 Whosefowlin'
piece
is
that
f.
he-
-rn
asked.
:?-.
:.
>
m
 It's-it'sminc,''said
Andy.Sj-Mahoney
took,thegun
up
andexamin-
med
it.
''
'
<.
m
.?-
 Is
 
this
followin'pieceloaded?
he
n
asked.
..
m
.
 Yes,V
said
Andy.
''It
is.
'
W
 Now,
listentome,
boys,
saidthe
m
constable.
.
 Was
thisfowlin'.
piece
dis-m
charged
lastnight?
.
V
» Yes,'.'
said
Andy.
 Itwasl
:
«j
0
 What's
up
?-Whathave
we
done
?''
|sasked;Jim
Bently
desperately.
.
.
ga
 Done
? shouted
Mahoney.
:
 Done
?
SI
Why
.
you've
filled
bothold
Foley
the|jtimber
getter's
.
legst
with
kangaroo
shot.
*
That's
what
you've
done
I
.
Do
youkuow
S
whatthat
is
?
'.
1
.
 No,?'saidJack'Jones.
He
wasiliink-
a
inghard.
Jj
. It's
..manslaughterI'.*roaredMahon-
R|
cy.
 What'sthemcanin'
of
it
?
Hp
They
explainedthc
meaning
as
far
asj||jS
they
were
able.
ItseemedthatMahon-
|H
eyhadfurtherevidence;-hehad
a
weak-
BBjjjness
for
theboys,
and
a
keen
sense
of
JO
1
humour,
outside
himself.
W:i
i
. Best
come
along
with
me,
he
said.
HS
Andy
had
a
stiff
Sunday
sack
.
suit,of
H«|
I
chocolatecolour,anda'starchedwhite
BMshirt
,
andcollar,
whichhe
kept
in
a
gin
case.
He
alwaysput.'cm
on
whenany-
BS
lie
fas-

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->