Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Nuclear Asia

Nuclear Asia

Ratings: (0)|Views: 20 |Likes:
Published by kasia09

More info:

Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: kasia09 on Oct 22, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/22/2009

pdf

text

original

 
U.S. Army War College, and ureau of Asian Research, Nationalry, Central Intelligence Agency, c c orwes aonear Threat Initiative, eparmen o nergy, ucares Fund  
Key Points:
Nuclear weapons are here to stay in China, India, Pakistan, and North Korea.he nuclear proliferation networks are in place. Shutting down A.Q. Khan’s network in Pakistan didnot necessarily eliminate the networks.he nuclear proliferation networks intersect with other criminal networks—in drug trafcking,human trafcking, and other organized crime networks.he networks that support the terrorist groups in Asia are probably intersecting with the networks thatfacilitate trade between suppliers and consumers in nuclear proliferation trade.he terrorist networks may be comprised principally of nonstate actors, but they operate inenvironments where the state actors may condone or at least tolerate their presence, so any policiesor security regimes directed at intercepting or disrupting the terrorist networks must manage therelationship with the state actors involved.Many of the Asian states are further developing their bilateral relations with their Asian neighborsto address their mutual security concerns--they are not waiting for a regional, multilateral solution.China, Japan, India and Pakistan are the most notable examples.All of the Asian states want to ensure that regional trade and economic development can proceed at a pace that allows them to meet their economic development goals. Exportcontrols cannot be seen as “trade inhibitors.” But if adopting common standards allowsexport controls to become “trade enhancers”—where nations are viewed as reliable trade partnersnot engaged in dangerous behavior—then these countires have been open to adopting export controlsystems that advance their economic interests.
UCLEAR ASIA
Compiled by Joseph Ferguson, DirectorNortheast Asia StudiesThe National Bureau of Asian ResearchandGael Tarleton, ConsultantPacic Northwest National Laboratory
 
Report Documentation Page
Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188
Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering andmaintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information,including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, ArlingtonVA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if itdoes not display a currently valid OMB control number.
 
1. REPORT DATE
 
MAR 2004
 
2. REPORT TYPE
 
3. DATES COVERED
 
-
4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE
 
Nuclear Asia
5a. CONTRACT NUMBER
 
5b. GRANT NUMBER
 
5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER
 
6. AUTHOR(S)
 
5d. PROJECT NUMBER
 
5e. TASK NUMBER
 
5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER
 
7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES)
 
Army War College,Strategic Studies Institute,122 ForbesAve,Carlisle,PA,17013-5244
 
8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATIONREPORT NUMBER
 
9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES)
 
10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S)
 
11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORTNUMBER(S)
 
12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT
 
Approved for public release; distribution unlimited
 
13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES
 
The original document contains color images.
 
14. ABSTRACT
 
see report
 
15. SUBJECT TERMS
 
16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF:
 
17. LIMITATION OFABSTRACT
 
18. NUMBEROF PAGES
 
4
 
19a. NAME OFRESPONSIBLE PERSON
 
a. REPORT
 
unclassified
 
b. ABSTRACT
 
unclassified
 
c. THIS PAGE
 
unclassified
 
Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98)
 Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18
 
2
On March 18-19, 2004, in Seattle, Washington,the National Bureau of Asian Research, PacicNorthwest National Laboratory, U.S. Army WarCollege, Central Intelligence Agency, Departmentof Energy, Nuclear Threat Initiative, and thePloughshares Fund co-sponsored a conferenceto explore the complex topics of nuclearproliferation, regional and global terrorism,and the state of nonproliferation regimes inAsia. The conference drew representatives fromgovernment, academe, and nonprot researchinstitutions from the United States and Asia.This event was an opportunity for policymakers,security analysts, nuclear scientists and engineers,regional experts, and military planners to shareperspectives and identify those issues requiringnew solutions as the international communityprepares for the 2005 Nuclear Non-ProliferationTreaty (NPT) Review.
Asia’s Nuclearization and Regional Instability.
As a region, Asia has the distinction ofexperiencing the world’s most rapid rates ofeconomic and population growth, the fastestexpansion of commercial nuclear power plantconstruction, the entrenchment of terror networks,and the fundamental failure of any state or groupof states to emerge as a force to advocate regionalsolutions to nuclear security risks facing the Asia-Pacic.Twenty-nine years after the NPT sought to“freeze” the Asian nuclear powers to a communityof one, Asia is now a nuclearized region.Unquestionably, the nuclear nonproliferationregime has experienced failures in Asia--nowIndia and Pakistan possess nuclear weapons,while North Korea either already possessesthem or is close to developing them. Moreover,a number of other Asian states are participatingin the Asian proliferators’ network, thus enablingother states to acquire nuclear technologies.mportant components of the internationalcommunity’s nonproliferation strategies--theNuclear Suppliers Group (NSG), the MissileTechnology Control Regime (MTCR), and otherdual-use technology export control regimes--have failed to stem the trade in nuclear materialsand technologies in Asia. There, nuclear suppliersappear willing to satisfy the demands of persistentbuyers.
The “Nexus of Terrorism and Nuclear-ArmedAdversaries.”
outh Asia now constitutes the place wherenuclear weapons, terrorist groups, state actorsinvolved in proliferation trade, and nuclearadversaries in confrontational postures allintersect on the India-Pakistan border. TheKorean Peninsula and the nations of NortheastAsia endure the most prolonged period ofcrisis since the Korean War, due to the nuclearmachinations of North Korea.onference participants agreed that it isparamount that the international communitymake every effort to understand the reasons forthe failure of the NPT and other nonproliferationregimes in Asia before new attempts are made toreplace the NPT, modify the NPT, or impose newinternational security regimes on Asian nations.No common view exists on the nature of thethreats that the region’s nations face from nuclearproliferation, or from terrorism internally withintheir own countries, and externally within theregion.ndia and Pakistan openly reject the NPT asan attempt to undermine their sovereign rightsto possess nuclear weapons. China has becomea convert to multilateral regimes only in thepast 3 years, and this remains a source of someconict internally. China pursues multilateralrelationships cautiously and with deliberation. Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan feel that regional,multilateral solutions will only weaken the specialnature of their bilateral relationships with theUnited States. Therefore, they tread very lightlywhen it comes to multilateral commitments.Southeast Asia is engaged in Asian multilateralregimes, but avoids those institutions where theUnited States plays a dominant role.he ultimate test of a new security regimein Asia is whether those states that have gainedentry into the nuclear club will choose to giveup their nuclear status. Without exception,the conference experts assessed that India will

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->