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Mar14c All

Mar14c All

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Published by: CBS_News on Mar 26, 2014
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03/31/2014

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CBS NEWS POLL For release: Tuesday, March 25
th
, 2014 6:30 pm EDT Challenges Abroad, Domestic Issues and the 2014 Elections
March 20-23, 2014 56% of Americans approve of the sanctions against Russia that the West has enacted, but
58% don’t expect the
y will be effective. Two in three are opposed to the U.S. providing military aid to Ukraine. Most feel that the situation in Ukraine is beyond U.S. control, and six in ten say the U.S. does not have a responsibility to do something there. More disapprov
e (46%) than approve (38%) of President Barack Obama’s handling of
the situation between Russia and Ukraine. Perceptions of the relationship between the U.S. and Russia have changed dramatically. 42% now see Russia as either an ally or friendly to the U.S., down from 2007 (68%) and 2003 (80%). 27% say signup on the health care exchanges is going well
 –
 up from 22% last month, and steadily increasing since last fall. 35% say the process is improving. Still, most remain opposed to the health care law overall. Over half of Americans think religious organizations should be able to opt out of insurance coverage for prescription birth control. However, 51% think companies and non-religious organizations should have to provide this for women employees.
Russia and Ukraine
There are limits to what Americans think the U.S. can accomplish regarding the recent Russian annexation of Crimea in Ukraine. 57% of Americans think the situation between Russia and Ukraine is beyond the control of the U.S.; just 37% think it is a conflict the U.S. can do something about.
The Conflict Between Russia and Ukraine Is…
 
Total Heard/read a lot about  Americans Russia and Ukraine Something the U.S. can do something about 37% 38% Beyond the control of the U.S. 57 59 So far, the U.S. and other countries have responded to
Russia’s annexation of Crimea
 by enacting sanctions, something most Americans
 –
 and most partisans -- approve of.
Sanctions Against Russia over Actions in Crimea
Total Reps Dems Inds  Approve 56% 55% 61% 53% Disapprove 32 33 28 35
But few Americans are hopeful that sanctions will be effective at changing Russia’s actions in
Ukraine and Crimea. Just 32% think sanctions will be at least somewhat effective, and most
 –
 
 
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58% - think sanctions will be not very or not at all effective. Democrats are a little more optimistic about the effectiveness of sanctions than are Republicans or independents.
How Effective Will Sanctions Be Against Russia?
Total Reps Dems Inds Very 5% 3% 7% 5% Somewhat 27 24 35 23 Not very/Not at all 58 64 48 63  Americans stop short when it comes to providing military aid and equipment to Ukraine. Just 26% think the U.S. should do so in response to Russia
’s actions,
and far more
 –
 65% - think the U.S. should not, including majorities of Republicans (59%), Democrats (67%), and independents (69%).
Should the U.S. Provide Military Aid and Equipment to Ukraine?
Total Reps Dems Inds Should 26% 32% 24% 24% Should not 65 59 67 69 Looking ahead, Americans think an expansion of the conflict is likely. 69% think it is at least somewhat likely that the situation between Russia and Ukraine will become a more widespread conflict involving neighboring countries and other parts of Europe, including 27% who think that is very likely.
Conflict between Russia and Ukraine Will Become a More Widespread War
Total Heard/read a lot about  Americans Russia and Ukraine Very likely 27% 34% Somewhat likely 42 37 Not too/at all likely 27 26 Most
 Americans don’t think the U.S. is obliged to intervene
 there: 61% of Americans do not think the U.S. has a responsibility to do something about the situation between Russia and Ukraine, nearly twice as many as think the U.S. does have that responsibility. There is widespread bipartisan agreement on this.
Does the U.S. Have a Responsibility to do Something About Russia and Ukraine?
Total Reps Dems Inds Yes 32% 37% 31% 29% No 61 58 61 62 Public opinion about Ukraine is similar to views about U.S. responsibility in other international conflicts. Majorities of Americans did not think the U.S. had a responsibility to intervene in Syria (68%), in the fighting and ethnic cleansing in Bosnia (65%) or in the mass killings in Rwanda (51%). In contrast, 54% of Americans believed the U.S. did have a responsibility to intervene in Kosovo, a situation where the U.S. began a bombing campaign against Serbian forces in cooperation with NATO.
 
3
Does the U.S. Have a Responsibility to do Something About…?
 
Yes No Russia and Ukraine (Now) 32% 61 The fighting in Syria (9/2013) 26% 68 Serbia and Kosovo (4/1999) 54% 37 Serbia and Bosnia (10/1995) 28% 65 Killing in Rwanda (6/1994) 34% 51 36% of Americans say they have heard or read a lot about the situation between Russia and Crimea, and those who have are far more likely to believe the U.S. has a responsibility to do something (45%) than those paying less attention (25%). Still, 51% of those who have heard or read a lot about the situation think the U.S. does not have a responsibility to get involved.
U.S.-Russia Relations
Perceptions of the relationship between the U.S. and Russia have changed dramatically from  just a few years ago. Today, 42% of Americans think of Russia as either an ally or friendly to the U.S., down from 68% in 2007 and 80% in 2003. 51% now see Russia as either unfriendly or an enemy, up significantly since 2003 and 2007.
Do You Consider Russia…?
 
Total 6/2007 2/2003  An ally 7% 10% 20% Friendly, but not an ally 35 58 60
Total Friendly 42% 68% 80%
Unfriendly, not enemy 33 18 8  An enemy 18 6 4
Total Not Friendly 51% 24% 12% Intervention and the U.S. Role in the World
In general, Americans are skeptical of the U.S. taking a lead role in solving international conflicts. While 36% of Americans think the U.S. should do so, most
 –
 58% - do not.
Should the U.S. Take the Lead Solving International Conflicts?
 Total 2/2014 5/2013 4/2003 Yes 36% 31% 35% 48% No 58 65 58 43 The poll also points to perceptions of a decline in the power of the U.S. as a world leader; 59% think the U.S. is less powerful than it was ten years ago.

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