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Teach Yourself Geometry

Teach Yourself Geometry

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Published by Hawksmoor1888
Teach Yourself Geometry
Teach Yourself Geometry

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Published by: Hawksmoor1888 on Mar 27, 2014
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The
course
is
clear,
logical
and
concise,
and
should
well
serve
its
purpose.
HigherEducationJournal
GEOMETRY
P.
Abbott
v
TEACH
YOURSELF
BOOKS
Hodder
and
Stoughton
 
First
printed
inthis
form
March
194.8
Revised
edition
1970
Third
impression
1973
Fourth
impression
1976
Fifth
impression
1977
Copyright
©
1970
edition
Hodder
and
Stoughton
Limited
All
rights
reserved*
No
part
of
this
publication
may
bereproduced
or
transmitted
in
any
form
or
by
any
means,
electronic
or
mechanical,
including
photocopy,
recording,
or
any
information
storage
and
retrieval
system,
without
permission
in
writing
from
the
publisher.isbn
o340
05595
2
Printed
in
Great
Britain
for
Hodderand
StoughtonPaperbacks,
a
division
of
Hodder
and
StoughtonLtd,
Mill
Road,
Dunton
Green,Sevenoaks,
Kent
{Editorial
Office;
47
Bedford
Square,
London
WCi
3DP)
by
Richard
Clay
{The
Chaucer
Press),Ltd.,
Bungay,
Suffolk
PREFACE
The
primary
object
of
this
book
is
to
provide
an
intro-
duction
to
the
fundamental
principles
of
Geometry
suitable
for
a
privatestudent,
whether
he
beone
who
is
desirous
of
beginning
the
study
of
the.
subject
or
one
who,
after
a
com-
pulsory
gap
in
his
education,
wishes
to
refresh
his
memory
of
previous
studies.
The
general
plan
of
the
book,
modified
in
accordance
with
its
special
purpose,
follows,in
the
main,
recommenda-
tions
made
some
years
ago
by
the
Teaching
Committee
of
the
Mathematical
Association,
of
which
committee
the
writer
was
atthe
time
the
Hon.
Secretary.
Accordingly
there
is
a
first
part
which
is
intended
tolead
thestudent
to
a
realization
of
basic
geometric
truths
by
appealing
to
common
sense
reasoning
and
intuition.
The
usual
proofs,
when
introduced
are
considerably
modified,
the
formal
proofs
in
logical
sequence
being
postponed
to
Part
II.
The
use
of
geometry
in
our
everyday
lifeis
constantly
indicated
so
thatthe
studentdoes
not
feel
thatthe
subject
is
merelyone
of
academic
interest.
Very
little
 
practical
geometry,
involving
drawing
and
measurements,
is
employed,
as
it
is
thought
to
be
hardly
suitable
to
the
kind
of
student
for
whom
the
book
is
written.
When,
however,
the
theorems
enunciated
aresuitable
for
thepurpose,aconsiderable
number
of
numerical
exercises
are
included,
their
main
purpose
being
to
impress
the
theorems
on
the
memory.
Also
suchelementary
mensura-
tion
as
arises
naturally
from
the
geometry
is
introduced
and
the
student
thus
acquires
a
knowledge
of
the
ordinary
rules
for
the
calculationof
areas
and
volumes.
No
previous
knowledge
of
Mathematics,
beyond
ordinary
Arithmetic,
is
required
by
a
student
who
proposes
to
use
 
PREFACE
the
book.
It
is
desirable,
however,
from
every
point
of
view
that
thestudent
who
possesses
but
little
knowledge
of
algebra
should
begin
his
study
of
that
subject
concurrently.
At
a
laterstage,
Trigonometry
should
be
started
when
the
student
will
begin
to
find
himself
weaving
together
threads
from
all
three
subjects
and
realising
their
interdependence.
NOTE
ON
THE
1970
EDITION
This
edition
has
been
revisedto
cover
the
introduction
into
Britain
of
SI
(Systems
Internationale),
the
internation-
ally
agreed
metricsystem.
In
two
respects
the
book
ignores
SI.
First,
for
various
reasons
the
centimetre
is
officially
excluded
from
the
units
available,
but
many
eminent
people
have
alreadyobjected
to
this
decision,
and
itis
certainly
true
that
itis
more
con-venient
to
handle
centimetres
when
making
constructions.
Secondly,
we
have
completely
ignored
theuse
of
the
radian,
a
unit
of
angularmeasure.
Its
advantages
are
not
apparent
in
the
earlier
stages
of
mathematics
and
there
are
not
many
protractors
available
marked
in
radians,
and
as
with
the
centimetre,
itis
more
convenient
inpractice.
If
thestudentdoes
come
across
radiansbefore
beingintroduced
to
them,
he
can
convert
them
to
degrees
by
multiplying
by
360/2*.
CONTENTS
PARA.
PAGE
Introduction.
What
is
Geometry
?
,
.
.
xv
PART
I
PRACTICAL
AND
THEORETICAL
GEOMETRY
CHAPTER
I
SOLIDS,
LINES,
POINTS
AND
SURFACES
1-8.
Geometric
figures.
Solids,
lines,
points,
plane
surfaces
.......
19
CHAPTER
2
ANGLES
9-20.
Adjacent,
vertically
opposite,
right,
acute,
obtuse.
Angles
formed
by
rotation.
Geometric
theorems,
converse
theorems.
Angles
at
a
point
.
.
26
CHAPTER
3
MEASUREMENT
OF
ANGLES
21-25.
The
circle.
Degrees,
protractors,
complementary
and
supplementary
angles
.
.
.
.36
Construction
No.
I
Exercise
1.
CHAPTER
4
SIMPLE
GEOMETRY
OF
PLANES
26-30.
Planes.
Angle
between
two
planes.
Vertical
and
horizontal
planes.
Angles
between
a
straight
line
and
a
plane
.
...
...
45

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