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194506 Desert Magazine 1945 June

194506 Desert Magazine 1945 June

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Published by: dm1937 on Feb 22, 2008
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THE
M A G A ZN E
I -%#
25 CENTS
 
.
EL BURRITO
By HELEN L. VOGEL
San Diego, CaliforniaLong-eared, swing-tailed mud-coat varmint,This yere's not where I'm a'aimin.'You know this pile 'aim no gold mint!I 'aim diggin' here nor stayin'.No-brained, sloe-eyed, flea-bit crittur,'Caint you see this takes some brainin' ?Squat yore stubborn rump an' sit yereWhilst I hunt an' do the strainin'.Horn-toed, nip-mouthed, brayin' jackass!Hey—hold on! Those rocks yore loosin
1
!Shift yore hide. Jus' move an' bypass.Gol—here's gold without no sluicin'.Strip my hide an' stop my honin'.Cute-eared, smart-tailed, grey coat darlin',Four legged wonder quit yore groanin'.You've growed wings to suit a starlin'.
THE WIND
By IDA SMITH
Prescott, ArizonaThere is quiet out on the desert.The warm sun sinks in the west.The wind whispers low through the sage brush,A message of peace and rest.It writes on the clean, white sand dunes;It talks in the swaying trees.Its sermons for aeons have spoken,In wild storms, and soft summer breeze.How I wish I could read that message,That sweeps o'er desert and fen;That for ages and ages has tried to speakTo the hearts and souls of men.
Son-jim
By IVAN MARDIS
Tucson, ArizonaI stumbled on this sunken graveOut on the desert wild—Oh Merciful God—what a desolate placeTo bury a little child!The place was marked with native stone,A tall one at the head!The artifacts were rusted toys—A tricycle and a sled.A jar now purpled by the sunHeld epitaph time-yellowed, torn and dim—In faded ink I read the words
''Age Three
Our Son,"
and
"Jim."
This little lad helped play the role—Though much too soon was laid to rest!It took sorrow, pain, and desert gravesTo write the epic of the West.
OLD-TIMER
By MARGARET GRAHAME COLLINS
Carlsbad, CaliforniaThe day will come when I shall see no moreThe lift of mesa to the windy sky.Nor sagebrush spreading on the desert floor,Nor mountains lift red battlements on high.The time will come when I shall ride no more;Shall hear no saddle-leather's friendly creak;Nor feel the storm and sunlight as before;Nor see the pale moon rise or the dawn break.For then I shall be riding far away—Down many a ghostly trail on shadowy hill.And I shall ride with comrades old and gay—With Billy the Kid, Kit Carson, Buffalo Bill,And Hickock, Custer, Crockett and the rest.Of all my rides, that one will be the best.
SERMONS
By CATHERINE M. HENSON
Flagstaff,
ArizonaThere are sermons in the yuccaSilent sermons in the dunes,Where the undulating sand moundsAlmost sing their hymnal tunes.There are sermons in the silhouettesThat frame a glowing sky,And the hardy men who tryIn the rugged saw-tooth mountainsTheir passing years at seekingMinerals held in rock and sand—Silent sermons ever waitingTo explorers of this land.In the quiet and the vastnessPetty thoughts of men grow broad,For the desert has its altarsResting at the Feet of God.
SPECTERS
OF
THE DESERT
By KATHARINE BUOY
Portland, OregonThe purple twilight deepens suddenly.The desert stars illume the trackless wasteAs dusk reveals a ghostly mystery,And with a strange disquiet I am faced;For out across the sandy wildernessA caravan of camels move in sight,Their drifting pace seems almost motionless—Dim mirage—vague specters of the night.Long, long ago these aliens trod the sandAnd ambled down beside the Salton Sea.Then one by one they vanished from the land—But famous still wherever they may be ...Before my dazed and unbelieving eyesMove creatures from the past in phantomguise . . .
THE DESERT MAGAZINE
 
DESERT
When
you
start
out to
look
for
treas-ure
in
your favorite hunting ground,
you
may
be the
type
to use a
forked-stick—but
not
Walter Ford. Next month, he'lltell DESERT readers
how the
scientistsdo
it.
"Doodlebug" doesn't sound scien-tific,
but
that's what
the
mining
and
geology fraternity have dubbed
the de-
vice which locates below-the-surface
min-
erals
by
means
of
electrical currents
and
radio waves.
And
they don't call
it
"treas-ure hunting"
or
"witching,"
but geo-
physical exploration.• Georgia
B.
Redfield makes
her
firstappearance
in
DESERT'S pages thismonth
as
author
of the
story about
Wil-
liam "Uncle
Kit"
Carson, nephew
of the
famous scout.
She
lives
in
Roswell,
New
Mexico, where
she has
written
for
localnewspapers
for 25
years.
She has con-
tributed
to
Sentinel
and
New
Mexico
magazines
the
past
10
years
and has
written many songs, stories
and
poems,and descriptive articles.• Waxen beauty
of the
saguaro blos-soms,
on
this month's cover, soon willmature into
the
luscious
red
tunas,
har-
vested each July
by the
Papago Indiansof southern Arizona. Setting
up
camp
in
the cactus forest, natives hook
the
fruitoff with long sticks, letting
it
fall ontoclean canvas. Youngsters
eat
many
of the
lipest immediately, before
the
women
can
pour them into large earthen cooking potsto boil, later
to
make syrup, fruit pasteand
jam, and
from
the
finely groundseeds,
the
wafer-like bread, piki.Clee Woods,
New
Mexico writer,
who
with
his
wife Betty explores
and
writesabout
the
Southwest, next month will tellabout
his
pilgrimage
to the
cave
of See-
a-huh,
the
great miracle performing
god
of
the
Pima
and
Papago Indians
in the
laraway days when these
two
tribes wereone.Story will
be
accompanied
by a
map showing location
of the
hidden cavein
the
rugged Baboquivari mountainssouthwest
of
Tucson, Arizona.• Even
if you
don't want
to
study,
you
are going
to
enjoy
the
geology lessonJerry Laudermilk
has
prepared
for you
next month.
The
subject
is
obsidian.
But
the
way
Jerry tells it—combined with
a
bit
of
Indian excavation
in
Arizona,
a
little rockhound lore,
a
trip into Aztec.and,
a
touch
of
Greek history,
and
somechemistry just
to top it
off—you won'tknow you've been
to a
geology class.
CREED OF THE DESERT
By
JUNE
LEMERT
PAXTON
Yucca Valley, CaliforniaBlack Ants have made
a
mountainOf chaff from filaree;At least,
it is a
mountain,As
far as
they
can see.
Volume 8JUNE, 1945Number 8COVERPOETRYCLOSE-UPSHISTORYNATUREFIELD TRIPEXPLORATIONPERSONALITYLOST MINEART OF LIVINGBOTANYDESERT QUIZHUMORLETTERSNEWSMININGHOBBYCRAFTCOMMENTBOOKS
SAGUARO CACTUS BLOOM, Photo by JosefMuench, Santa Barbara, California.Our Son—Jim, and other poems 2Notes on Desert features and their writers .... 3Trek of the Mormon BattalionBy SHERMAN BAKER 4Desert Midget and Jungle GiantBy JERRY LAUDERMILK 9Crystal Jewel Box in the Utah DesertBy CHARLES KELLY 11Lone Survivors of a DelugeBy RANDALL HENDERSON 14Uncle Kit, FrontiersmanBy GEORGIA B. REDFIELD 17Rumors of GoldBy BARRY STORM 20Desert Refuge, by MARSHAL SOUTH 23Sunflower PageantryBy MARY BEAL 25A test of your desert knowledge 26Hard Rock Shorty of Death Valley 26Comment from Desert readers 27Here and There on the Desert 29Current news briefs 32Gems and Minerals—Edited by ARTHUR L. EATON 33Amateur Gem Cutter, by LELANDE QUICK ... 37fust Between You and MeBy RANDALL HENDERSON 38Old California Trail, and other reviews .... 39
The Desert Magazine
is
published monthly
by the
Desert Publishing Company,
636
State Street,
El
Centro, California. Entered
as
second class matter October
11, 1937, at the
post office
at El
Centro, California, under
the Act of
March
3, 1879.
Title registered
No.
358865
in U. S.
Patent Office,
and
contents copyrighted
1945 by the
Desert Publishing
Com-
pany. Permission
to
reproduce contents must
be
secured from
the
editor
in
writing.RANDALL HENDERSON, Editor. LUCILE HARRIS, Associate Editor.BESS STACY, Business Manager.
EVONNE HENDERSON, Circulation Manager.Unsolicited manuscripts
and
photographs sub-mitted cannot
be
returned
or
acknowledgedunless full return postage
is
enclosed. Desert Magazine assumes
no
responsibility
for
damageor loss
of
manuscripts
or
photographs although
due
care will
be
exercised. Subscribers shouldsend notice
of
change
of
address
by the
first
of the
month preceding issue.
Tf
address
is un-
certain
by
that date, notify circulation department
to
hold copies.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One
year
....
$2.50Canadian subscriptions
25c
extra,
foreign
50c
extra.
Subscriptions
to
Army personnel outside U.S.A. must
be
mailed
in
conformity withP.O.D. Order
No.
19687.
Address correspondence
to
Dasert Magazine,
636
State
St., El
Centro, California.
JUNE, 1945

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