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194508 Desert Magazine 1945 August

194508 Desert Magazine 1945 August

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Published by: dm1937 on Feb 22, 2008
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THE
M A G A Z
\
\
\
il
AUGUST,1945
25 CENTS
 
STORY OF THE SHEEPMANIS TOLD WITHOUT GLAMOR
Three animals played major roles inSouthwestern history, all of them gifts ofold Spain. They modified the lives of whiterr.an and Indian alike; they provided thebasis for the folklore and drama of theSouthwest. The horse, which made theComanche a warrior and the Anglo-Ameri-can a cowboy, has finished his role. TheLonghorn has disappeared. But the sheepstays on and his importance is even increas-His story, from his ancient beginningsin Africa and Spain to the present intensiveexperimental stage, is told by WinifredKupper in THE GOLDEN HOOF, dedi-cated to J. Frank Dobie and published inMay 1945 by Alfred A.
Knopf,
New York.It is the story of sheep and of the menwho moved with them through Texas andNew Mexico, of the Indians and cowmenand squatters and wolf packs and blizzardsand droughts that beset their progress.
Mrs.
Kupper has not had to rely sofelyon the rather extensive bibliography shelists or even on tales of the old sheepmen,lor she was born and raised on a sheepranch at Bandera, Texas. She started out tobe a sheepwoman as a child under the wisetutelage of one of the old-timers, RobertMaudslay—and when she walked out onthe range with her flock, she was no pictureof elegance. For she says, that was yearsbefore "the dudes from the East were toshow us what a young girl should wear inthe West.""When the writers of immigration book-lets began the campaign that was to lurethousands to the unsettled Southwest theypictured a Utopia where a man had onlyto camp out-of-doors and watch his sheepnibble the thick grass day after day whilehe enjoyed the cool breezes of summerand the warm sunlight of winter." But thatisn't the picture the author gives of thesheep industry. There was the colorful,traditional side, to be sure, but with a first-hand knowledge of all its phases, she doesnot omit the prosaic work of everyday norminimize the hardships and the dangers ofIndians, hostile cattlemen, predator ani-mals and the elements.One of the many interesting chaptersdeals with the Navajo woman, who is bothherder and weaver, and who more thananyone else in the Southwest has made thesheep business a career and a creative life.Frontispiece from oil painting by N. C.Wyeth. Bound
in
red cloth stamped ingold, printed on goldenrod. 203 pp. $2.75.
CHINLEE RUG DESCRIBED INNAVAJO TEXTILE SERIES
The beautiful Chinlee rugs of the Na-vajo Indians, recognized by their colorschemes which in:lude various shades ofyellows and browns, warm or greenish
greys,
dull lake and brownish reds and a
Country
The Romance of a Drop of Water and a Grain of Sand
By JULIUS F. STONEWith 300 halftone plates, this book is a graphic presentation of thenatural processes of uplift and erosion by which America's most scenicgorge was created. The author is one of the recognized authorities onthe geology of the Grand Canyon country.This book has long been out of print, but Desert Crafts Shop hasobtained a limited number of new copies which will be sent postpaid atthe publisher's original price of
$5.00
Write for our complete list of books of the Southwest.
DESERT CRAFTS SHOP
El Centro, California
subdued pink, besides pastel shades, arethe result of an interesting collaboration.L. H. (Cozy) McSparron, Indian traderat Chinlee, Arizona, and Miss Mary CabotWheelwright, interested in the economicstatus of Navajo weavers, inaugurated ex-periments to eliminate both the cold drabeffect of many of the native vegetable dyesand the gaudiness of the cheap aniline
dyes.
Through Miss Wheelwright's in-fluence the Du Pont chemical corporationmade up a number of easily handled dyestuffs in shades which were intended toduplicate those seen in the old faded andmellowed blankets so highly prized bycollectors. Although this experimentstarted at Chinlee (where it acquired its
name),
the style since has spread to otherparts of the Navajo reservation.History and description of the Chinleeblanket are given in one of the most recentof the bulletins published by Laboratory ofAnthropology at Santa Fe, New Mexico.To date 16 bulletins in the General Series,relating to various types of Navajo textile
arts,
have been printed.Some of the other types treated in theseries are, the Chief Blanket, Blankets ofthe Classic Period, Slave Blanket, PictorialBlankets, Navajo Woven Dresses. Each is
4%
x 5 inches, bound in stiff art paperand printed on fine book paper. There aremany illustrations, including halftone
plates,
depicting the finest available ex-amples of each type of textile. A set of13 bulletins is now available at $3.25.
BOOK BRIEFS*
.". 'Dictionary of California place names isbeing prepared by Dr. Erwin G. Gudde tobe published "in something over a yearfrom now" by University of California
Press,
Berkeley. It will be a "large bookand as authentic as honest and carefulscholarship can make it." On advisorycommittee is George R. Stewart, Americanliterature teacher at UC, whose
Names onthe
hand,
first general history of placenaming in US, recently was published byRandom House.Dr. Agapito Rey, professor of Spanish atIndiana University, has been in Albuquer-que this summer collaborating with Dr.G. P. Hammond, University of New Mex-
ico,
on another in their Coronado histori-cal series on the Southwest. Series includes
The Narratives of the Coronado Expedi-
tion.
Their latest work,
Benavides Memor-ial on New Mexico,
is being published byUniversity of New Mexico Press.Rosemary Taylor, following her successwith
Chicken Every Sunday,
is producingmore books with an Arizona setting. Shehas just completed
Ridin' on a Rainbow,
astory using her father's life as the theme,as the first was about her mother, and nowis writing another,
Floradora on a Pony,
based on the famous 76 ranch and itsowner Mrs. W. T. Webb.
THE DESERT MAGAZINE
 
DESERT
Glote-VpA.
• According
to the
Navajo. their sheepcame
to
them
as a
gift
of the
gods. LittleLefty, Richard
Van
Valkenburgh's hoston
one of his
trips through Navajoland.told
him the
story
as the old
singers
of
the tribe have told
it.
Van's version
of
the introduction
of
sheep
to the
South-west
and of the
first Navajo weaving,
dif-
fers from
the
legendary history—but
Van
has written both versions
for
DESERTreaders,
to be
presented
in a
comingissue.• John
W.
Hilton, artist-writer
who has
contributed many
gem
field trips
and
other features
for
DESERT,
has had one
book accepted
and
another contracted
for.
His
Sonora Sketchbook,
telling
of his
experiences
in
Mexico
and
illustratedwith
his
drawings,
is
scheduled
for
early1946 publication
by the
Macmillan
com-
pany.
The
second will
be
another sketch-book featuring Coachella Valley desertarea.
In
between writing, John continuesto paint.
He
recently completed
two
paintings while
in
Death Valley.Louise Baker's
Party Line,
publishedlast spring
by
Whittlesey House,
was
condensed
in the
July issue
of
Reader'sDigest.
Both Louise
and her
husbandSherman Baker
are
DESERT writers.• Natt
N.
Dodge believes
the
story
of
of
the
saguaro disease, which
he
tellsabout
in
this issue, will
go
down
as one
of
the
classics
in the
series
of
revelationsabout
the
inter-relationships
of
plant
and
animal life. Natt,
who has
written
nu-
merous features
for
DESERT
in the
past,is
a
naturalist
in the
National Park
Ser-
vice.
He was
stationed
at
SouthwesternNational Monument headquarters, Cool-idge, Arizona, when
he
first contributedto DESERT.
He
later lived
at
Santa
Fe,
New Mexico, when headquarters
was
moved there. Just recently
he was as-
signed
to the
Chicago office.Jerry Laudermilk, DESERT writerand professor
at
Pomona College, Clare-mont, California,
in
July
was
appointedcurator
of the
college museums, whichhouse many rare fossils
and
other itemsof interest
to
desert minded people.
He
estimates there
are at
least "10,000thousand stories here."
CREED OF THE DESERT
By
JUNE
LE
MERT PAXTON
Yucca Valley, CaliforniaThe desert weaves
a web to
entrap,And does
the
task quite neatly;For
he who
comes back here
too oft,
Enmeshed
is he,
completely.
Volume 8AUGUST, 1945Number 10COVERBOOKSCLOSE-UPSNATUREFIELD TRIPHUMORMINERALSDESERT QUIZLETTERSBOTANYPERSONALITYMININGART OF LIVINGNEWSCRAFTHOBBYCOMMENTPOETRY
NAVAJO MOTHER AND CHILD. Photo by the lateWm. M. Pennington.The Golden
Hoof,
and other reviews 2Notes on Desert features and their writers ... 3Nature Sets New Booby TrapsBy NATT N. DODGE 4Vanishing Oasis of Palm WashBy RANDALL HENDERSON 9Hard Rock Shorty of Death Valley 8Calcium—Mineral of Many GuisesBy JOHN D. THOMPSON 13A test of your desert knowledge 16Comment from Desert readers
.......
17When Yucca FlowersBy JERRY LAUDERMILK 18Burbank of the UtesBy DAMA LANGLEY 23Current news briefs 26Desert Refuge, by MARSHAL SOUTH .... 27Here and There on the Desert 29Amateur Gem Cutter, by LELANDE QUICK ... 32Gems and Minerals 33Just Between You and MeBy RANDALL HENDERSONRuins, and other poems . . .
3739
The Desert Magazine
is
published monthly
by the
Desert Publishing Company,
636
State Street,
El
Centre, California. Entered
as
second class matter October
11, 1937, at the
post office
at El
Centro. California, under
the Act of
March
3, 1879.
Title registered
No.
358865
in U. S.
Patent Office,
and
contents copyrighted
1945 by the
Desert Publishing
Com-
pany. Permission
to
reproduce contents must
be
secured from
the
editor
in
writing.RANDALL HENDERSON, Editor. LUCILE HARRIS, Associate Editor.BESS STACY, Business Manager.
EVONNE HENDERSON, Circulation Manager.Unsolicited manuscripts
and
photographs submitted cannot
be
returned
or
acknowledgedunless full return postage
is
enclosed. Desert Magazine assumes
no
responsibility
for
damageor loss
of
manuscripts
or
photographs although
due
care will
be
exercised. Subscribers shouldsend notice
of
change
of
address
by the
first
of the
month preceding issue.
If
address
is un-
certain
by
that date, nctify circulation department
to
hold copies.
SUBSCRIPTION RATESOne
year
....
$2.50Canadian subscriptions
25c
extra, foreign
50c
»xtra.
Subscriptions
to
Army personnel outside U.S.A. must
be
mailed
in
conformity withP.O.D. Order
No.
19687.
Address
correspondence
to
Desert Magazine,
636
State
St., El
Cantro, California.
AUGUST,
1945

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