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194603 Desert Magazine 1946 March

194603 Desert Magazine 1946 March

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Published by: dm1937 on Feb 22, 2008
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05/24/2012

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MAGAZINE
MARCH, 194625 CENTS
 
WfAaf&
'wad-rated
gasoline.
?
•• Road-rated gasoline
is a new
development
in
gasoline refining.It came about through
the
discov-ery that
the
octane rating
of a gas-
oline
is not the
same
at all
speeds.
A*
Before
Shis was known,
stand-ard tests
for
octane number wererun
off on
laboratory engines
at a
fixed speed.Obviously,
if
the octanerating
of a
gasoline
varied
at dif-
ferent speeds, this method wasn'ttelling
the
whole story.
3»
For
example,
two
differentblends
of
gasoline might have
the
same octane rating
in an
engine
at
18 m.p.h., and
yet
have entirely
dif-
ferent values
at
speeds
of 5,
25,
or
50 m.p.h.
4*
Because
of
this fact.
Union OilCompany now uses theRoad Methodfor determining the quality and per-formance
of
"76" Gasoline. ThisRoad Method
is
just what
the
nameimplies—
5*
It
tests
the
performance
of a
gasoline
in
traffic
and out on ths
open road, where
the
whole
story
of
octane rating can be accurately meas-ured
at all
speeds
and
under actualdriving conditions.
UNION OIL COMPANY
6* That's why
the new Road-Rated
"76"
Gasoline makes such
a
differ-ence
in
your car.
It has
been moreprecisely blended than
any
gasolinepreviously known. This precisionblending means far greater efficiencyfar your engine
easier, smootherdriving.
ROAD-RATED GASOUME
THE DESERT MAGAZINE
 
DESERT
M. R.
Harrington, curator
of
South-west Museum,
Los
Angeles,
and
contribu-tor
to
DESERT,
has
been elected honor-ary member
of the
Sociedad Espeliologicade Cuba
"in
consideration
of his
greatservices
to the
archeology
of our
coun-try." Harrington's Cuban researches werepublished
in
book form under
the
title
of
Cuba Before Columbus
by the
Museum
of
the American Indian, Heye Foundation,New York.
Two
DESERT writers have
new
booksscheduled
for May
publication
by the
Macmillan company.
Ed
Ainsworth'sbook
is
Eagles
Fly
West,
a
long novelof
the
turbulent times
of the
mid-19th-century—the fight over admission
of
California
to the
Union,
the
approachingCivil
War,
flaming early California poli-tics—and
the
personal story
of a
youngNew York newspaperman
on
James
Gor-
don Bennett's
old
Herald.
His
hero
is in-
evitably
a
newsman, since Ainsworth,now editor
of Los
Angeles Times
edi-
torial page,
has
been
one
most
of his
life.
The
other
is a
book DESERT readersespecially will
be
interested
in,
both
be-
cause
of the
author
and
locale. John
Hil-
ton calls
his
Sonora Sketchbook
an ex-
periment
in
sharing
his
memories
of
living, sketching, painting
and
collect-ing scientific specimens
in
Sonora,Mexico.• Dama Langley's Hopi Eagle story,originally scheduled
for
this issue,
is
postponed
for a
future number. Anothercontribution
of Mrs.
Langley's,
to
appearsoon,
is a
series
of two
articles aboutNavajo weaving. First installment willdescribe
the
preliminary steps
of
card-ing, spinning, cleaning
and
dyeing.
Sec-
ond article will give more details
on ac-
tual weaving process, from erection
of
the loom
to
description
of the
varioustypes
of
rugs woven
in
Navajoland.
DESERT CALENDAR
Feb.
28-Mar. 2—International DesertCavalcade, Calexico, California.
His-
torical pageant
and
fiesta.Mar. 7-9—Rocky Mountain Federation
of
Mineralogical Societies holds conven-tion
at
Phoenix, Arizona.Mar. 23-24—Apache Grove rodeo,
on
Clifton-Duncan, Arizona, highway.Mar. 26-31—17th annual SouthwesternLivestock show
and
championship
ro-
deo,
El
Paso, Texas.Mar. 30-31—Ninth annual
Gem and
Mineral show
of
Southwest Mineralo-gists, Auditorium, Harvard play-ground,
6160
Denker avenue,
Los
Angeles, California.
Circulation
of
this issue
of
Desert Magazine
is ...
27,200 COPIES
Volume 9MARCH, 1946Number 5COVERCLOSE-UPSPHOTOGRAPHYHISTORYFIELD TRIPPOETRYPERSONALITYART OF LIVINGOASISHOMEMAKINGHUMORMININGADVENTURERWILDFLOWERSLETTERSTRUE OR FALSENEWSHOBBYCRAFTCOMMENTBOOKS
YUCCA IN BLOOM. Zion National Park, Utah. Photoby Chuck Abbott, Tucson, Arizona.Notes on Desert features and contributors ... 3Prize winning photos in January contest.... 4First Emigrant TrainBy CHARLES KELLY 5'Petrified Ice' in a Sandstone ZooBy JOHN HILTON 9The Desert is a-Bloom Again, and other poems . . 13He Still Has His FriendsBy F. CONRAD 14Desert Refuge, by MARSHAL SOUTH .... 17Dripping Springs in the Santa RosasBy RANDALL HENDERSON 19Beauty from the RoadsideHard Rock Shorty of Death Valley 72By MARGARET CARRICK 23News briefs from the desert 27He Rode the Wilderness TrailBy FRANK C. LOCKWOOD 28A forecast of spring bloom 30Comment from Desert readers 31A Test of your desert knowledge 32Here and There on the Desert 33Gems and MineralsEdited by ARTHUR L. EATON 39Amateur Gem Cutter, by LELANDE QUICK . . 45Just Between You and MeBy the Editor 46This is the Place: Utah, and other reviews ... 47
The Desert Magazine
is
published monthly
by the
Desert Publishing Company,
636
State Street,
El
Centro, California. Entered
as
second class matter October
11, 1937, at the
post office
at El
Centro, California, under
the Act of
March
3, 1879.
Title registered
No.
358865
in U. S.
Patent Office,
and
contents copyrighted
1946 by the
Desert Publishing
Com-
pany. Permission
to
reproduce contents must
be
secured from
the
editor
in
writing.RANDALL HENDERSON, Editor. LUCILE HARRIS, Associate Editor.BESS STACY, Business Manager.
EVONNE RIDDELL, Circulation Manager.Unsolicited manuscripts
and
photographs submitted cannot
be
returned
or
acknowledgedunless full return postage
is
enclosed. Desert Magazine assumes
no
responsibility
for
damageor loss
of
manuscripts
or
photographs although
due
care will
be
exercised. Subscribers shouldsend notice
of
change
of
address
by the
first
of the
month preceding issue.
If
address
is un-
certain
by
that date, notify circulation department
to
hold copies.SUBSCRIPTION RATESOne year
....
$2.50Canadian subscriptions
25c
extra, foreign
50c
extra.Subscriptions
to
Army personnel outside U.S.A. must
be
mailed
in
conformity withP.O.D. Order
No.
19687.Address correspondence
to
Desert Magazine,
636
State
St., El
Centro, California.
FEBRUARY, 1946

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