Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
12Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Pakistan: Countering Militancy in Fata

Pakistan: Countering Militancy in Fata

Ratings: (0)|Views: 418 |Likes:
Published by basit79
International Crisis Group report on latest situation in Pakistan
International Crisis Group report on latest situation in Pakistan

More info:

Published by: basit79 on Oct 23, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/01/2013

pdf

text

original

 
PAKISTAN: COUNTERING MILITANCY IN FATA
Asia Report N°178 – 21 October 2009
 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTSEXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS.................................................iI.
 
INTRODUCTION.............................................................................................................1
 
II.
 
DYSFUNCTIONAL GOVERNANCE............................................................................2
 
A.
 
FATA’
S
A
DMINISTRATION
..........................................................................................................2
 
B.
 
S
TALLED
EFORMS
......................................................................................................................4
 
III.
 
COSTS OF CONFLICT...................................................................................................5
 
A.
 
S
PREAD OF
M
ILITANCY
................................................................................................................5
 
B.
 
S
HATTERED
E
CONOMY
................................................................................................................7
 
C.
 
C
ONFLICT
-I
 NDUCED
D
ISPLACEMENT
:
 
T
HE
“O
THER 
 
IDP
S
..........................................................8
 
IV.
 
BEYOND SECURITY: CHALLENGES TO DEVELOPMENT...............................10
 
A.
 
S
TRUCTURAL
I
MPEDIMENTS
.......................................................................................................10
 
B.
 
C
IVIL
B
UREAUCRACY
................................................................................................................11
 
V.
 
MOVING FORWARD....................................................................................................13
 
A.
 
C
HANGING
FATA’
S
S
TATUS
.....................................................................................................13
 
1.
 
Political enfranchisement...........................................................................................................13
 
2.
 
Legal rights and judicial reform.................................................................................................14
 
B.
 
P
RIORITISING
H
EALTH AND
E
DUCATION
....................................................................................15
 
1.
 
Health.........................................................................................................................................15
 
2.
 
Education...................................................................................................................................16
 
C.
 
A
CHIEVING
S
ECURITY
:
 
S
TRENGTHENING
C
IVILIAN
L
AW
E
 NFORCEMENT
...................................17
 
VI.
 
THE U.S. ROLE..............................................................................................................19
 
A.
 
G
AUGING
A
SSISTANCE
...............................................................................................................19
 
B.
 
ECONSTRUCTION
O
PPORTUNITY
Z
ONES
...................................................................................22
 
VII.
 
CONCLUSION...............................................................................................................23
 
APPENDICES
A.
 
G
LOSSARY
.......................................................................................................................................25
B.
 
M
AP OF
P
AKISTAN
...........................................................................................................................26
C.
 
M
AP OF
 NWFP
AND
FATA.............................................................................................................27
D.
 
A
BOUT THE
I
 NTERNATIONAL
C
RISIS
G
ROUP
....................................................................................28
E.
 
C
RISIS
G
ROUP
EPORTS AND
B
RIEFINGS ON
A
SIA
............................................................................29
F.
 
C
RISIS
G
ROUP
B
OARD OF
T
RUSTEES
................................................................................................32
 
 
Asia Report N°178 21 October 2009 
PAKISTAN: COUNTERING MILITANCY IN FATAEXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS
The military operation in South Waziristan is unlikelyto succeed in curbing the spread of religious militancy inthe Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), unlessthe Pakistan government implements political reformsin that part of the country. Pakistani Taliban groupshave gained significant power in the tribal agencies, sevenadministrative districts bordering on Afghanistan. Whilestate institutions in FATA are increasingly dysfunctional,the militants have dismantled or assumed control of analready fragile tribal structure. This encroaching Tali- banisation is not the product of tribal traditions or resis-tance. It is the result of short-sighted military policies anda colonial-era body of law that isolates the region fromthe rest of the country, giving it an ambiguous constitu-tional status and denying political freedoms and economicopportunity to the population. While the militants’ holdover FATA can be broken, the longer the state delaysimplementing political, administrative, judicial and eco-nomic reforms, the more difficult it will be to stabilisethe region.Badly planned and poorly coordinated military operations,followed by appeasement deals, have accommodatedmilitant recruitment and actions, enabling Pakistani Tali- ban groups to expand their control over the region.Many militants, including commanders fleeing militaryoperations in Northwest Frontier Province (NWFP)’sMalakand division, have also relocated to FATA. In-stead of a sustained attempt to dismantle and destroythe Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) network – led byBaitullah Mehsud until his death on 5 August 2009 in aU.S. drone attack and now by his deputy HakimullahMehsud – the military continues to rely on a two-prongedapproach of sporadic strikes and negotiations with mili-tant groups. Given that such operations are, by the mili-tary’s own admission, restricted, militant networks areultimately able to absorb the blows even as indiscrimi-nate damage alienates the local population caught in thecrossfire.The current military operation may well be a more exten-sive attempt to root out the Baitullah Mehsud network in South Waziristan but it remains an incomplete effortand could even prove counterproductive because of par-allel efforts to reach or consolidate peace deals with rivalTTP groups. It has yet to show that it will be directed atthe Afghanistan Taliban or al-Qaeda strongholds. It hasalso already spurred a new round of internally displaced persons (IDPs) with little to show that the country has planned for that eventuality.More than a million FATA residents already have beendisplaced by the conflict, mostly from Bajaur agency inthe north and Waziristan in the south. Ongoing militaryoperations in Khyber agency have forced as many as100,000 to flee to safer locations in NWFP. While themilitary restricts domestic and international humanitar-ian access to FATA’s conflict zones, neither the Pakistangovernment nor the international community has addressedthe full costs of the conflict to civilians. Malakand’s IDPshave justifiably received considerable domestic and in-ternational attention, but the needs of FATA’s IDPs areyet to be addressed.Militant violence and military operations have also under-mined any prospect of economic development in the tribalagencies. FATA was severely underdeveloped even be-fore the rise of militancy due to government neglect,legal barriers and structural impediments to investmentand private enterprise. With no economic regulation or  proper courts, a black economy has flourished, notablya pervasive arms and drugs trade. Violence is now con-tributing to poverty, with the lack of jobs making FATA’sresidents vulnerable to militant recruitment.The military’s resort to indiscriminate force, economic blockades and appeasement deals is only helping theTaliban cause. The Pakistan government could winhearts and minds and curb extremism through broadinstitutional, political and economic changes to FATA’sgovernance. The government should dismantle the exist-ing undemocratic system of patronage driven by politi-cal agents – FATA’s senior-most civilian bureaucrats – as well as tribal
maliks
(elders) who are increasinglydependent on militants for protection. It must enact andthe international community, particularly the U.S., shouldsupport a reform agenda that would encourage politicaldiversity and competition, enhance economic opportunity,

Activity (12)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
purianjubala liked this
badarhussnain liked this
Bheru Lal liked this
Jagoo2 liked this
rohit_s77 liked this
rohit_s77 liked this
msabir88 liked this
Hassan Khalid liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->