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194702 Desert Magazine 1947 February

194702 Desert Magazine 1947 February

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Published by dm1937

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Published by: dm1937 on Feb 23, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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09/06/2012

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THE
M A G A Z AN f
--. ,».
•• . •• •• .- • •'•'> *.;,
I
FEBRUARY, 1947
.
25 CENTS
 
WITHOUT
AN
OIL CHAN6E/
HOW CAN YOU
DO IT?
THE THINGS THAT MAKE" ORDINARY OILSBREAK DOWN ARER
l,0OO
MILES
OR SO,
ARE ACIDITY, SLUDGING
AND
OXIDATION.DURING THE WAR, UNION OlLSClENTISTS
DEVELOPED SPECIAL
COMPOUNDS
FOR
THE ARMED FORCES
TO
OVERCOME
THESE'WEAKNESSES.
THESE COMPOUNDS HA\JPBEEN INCLUDED
IN
NEW TRITON
MOTOR OIL.
YES.'
AT
FIRST,
SOME
PEOPLE
WOULDNVBELIEVE
AN OIL
COULD
BE
THAT GOOD.BUT
NEW
TRITON'S BEEN
ON THE
MARKET OVER.
A
YEAR
NOW, AND
THOUSANDS
OF
PEOPLE WHOVE TRIEDTRITON KNOW THATTHEY
CAN 6ET
BETTER EN6INE PROTECTION THANEVER
AND
STILL ONLY CHAN6E
OIL
ZTJ/VtES
A
YEAR!
SUPPOSE YOU'VEABOUTOIL GETTINGDIRTY?
TRITON HAS
A
SPECIAL COMPOUNDWHICH HOLDS PlKTIN SUSPENSION.BECAUSE
TRITON CLEANS
YOURENGINE
AS
>OU
DRIVE, THE OIL
WAX
DARKEN.BOTTHAT WONT* HURTANVTHING- WITH TRITON,OIL MEANS
A
CLEAN
MOTOR.!
MILES
ON
YOURCAR?
YOU STILL NEED CHANGE OIL ONiY 2TIMESA YEAR.
AT
FIRST; YOU
MAy
USE
A
LITTLEAKJRE OIL, BECAUSE TRITONS DETERGENTCOMPOUND CLEANS YOUR MOTOR.
BUT
AFTER.THAT; YOULLHAVE
A
FREER,CLEANER MOTOR...
OF
COURSE, EVEN
A
BRAND NEW ENGINE USES SOME OIL,
SO
BE SURE"
AND
KEEP
THE
LEVEL
UP.
OF CALIFORNIA
THE DESERT MAGAZINE
 
DESERT
• Scheduled for March publication inDesert is John D. Mitchell's "Bells ofOld Guevavi," first of a new series of lostmine stories by the author of
Lost Minesand Buried Treasures of the Great South-west,
and other books and stories nowout of print. Setting for first article isnear Nogales, Arizona. Others will befrom various parts of Arizona and fromTexas and New Mexico. Series is illus-trated by John Hansen, artist formerly ofSalt Lake City, now of San Mateo, Cali-fornia.Motorists reading Charles Kelly'sstory in this issue will find that a newUtah wonderland is about to be openedto them, and the distance to other scenicpoints greatly shortened by recent com-pletion of a pilot road. Kelly gives thelog of his trip over this route, whichstarts at Fruita and ends at Hite, about100 miles away at the Colorado river.From deep in the Navajo reservationToney Richardson has brought a strangestory of Navajo superstition and mystery,scheduled for next month's issue of Des-ert.
Trees That Died of Fear
is the sub-ject of this unusual feature—and as evi-dence that it is not fiction Norton Allenhas drawn a map showing the location ofa phenomenon that has been as bafflingto botanists as it has been to the tribes-men of that region.
DESERT CALENDAR
Feb.
1-2—State
high school ski meet,Snow Bowl,
Flagstaff,
Arizona.Feb. 7-8—State convention, Arizona Cat-tle Growers' association, Prescott,Arizona.Feb. 7-9—Second annual gem and min-eral show and field trip, sponsored byDesert Gem and Mineral society,Blythe, California.Feb.9-16—Arizona state citrus show,Mesa, Arizona.Feb. 15—Turtle dance, Taos pueblo,New Mexico.Feb. 15-16—World's championship ro-deo, Yuma, Arizona.Feb. 20-23—Riverside County Fair andDate festival, fairgrounds, Indio, Cali-fornia.Feb. 22-23—Twenty-second annual Fi-esta de los Vaqueros and rodeo,Tucson, Arizona.Feb. 22-23—Sierra Club trip to Pusha-walla canyon and adjacent areas. Campwill be in Coachella valley near canyonmouth. R. J. Schonborn, leader.Feb. 22-23—Thunderbird Invitationalski meet, Snow Bowl,
Flagstaff,
Ariz.
CREED OF THE DESERT
By JUNE LEMERT PAXTON
Yucca Valley, CaliforniaDeep silence is stirred by the desertbreeze,And warmed by the sun's embrace;The peace and solace everywhere foundAre gifts of the Father's grace.
Volume 10FEBRUARY. 1947Number 4COVERCLOSE-UPSCALENDARPHOTOGRAPHYGEM HUNTPOETRYTRAVELBOTANYNATURELETTERSEXPLORATIONMYSTERYMININGNEWSDESERT QUIZLAPIDARYHOBBYCONTESTBOOKSCOMMENT
HOME OF MR. AND MRS. PACKRAT. Packrat's nestin Joshua tree, west of Lancaster, California.Photo by Fred Hankins, Taft, California.Notes on Desert contributors 3February events on the desert 3Prize winners in December contest 4Trail to TurquoiseBy RICHARD VAN VALKENBURGH ... 5Meditations From a Rocky LedgeBy LOIS ELDER ROY 9New Road into the Utah WildernessBy CHARLES KELLY 10Wild Pie Plant, by MARY BEAL . . . -. . . 15Career of a Botanical ThiefBy JERRY LAUDERMILK 16Comment from Desert readers 18Palms of PalomarBy RANDALL HENDERSON 19Canyon Voyager is Missing 22Current news briefs 24Here- and There on the Desert 25A test of your desert knowledge 26Amateur Gem Cutter, by LELANDE QUICK . . 30Gems and Minerals—Edited by ARTHUR L. EATON .... 31Photo contest announcement 35California Land Names, other reviews .... 37Just Between You and Me, by the Editor ... 38
The Desert Magazine is published monthly by the Desert Press, Inc., 636 State Street,El Centro, California. Entered as second class matter October 11, 1937, at the post office atEl Centro, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Title registered No. 358865 in U. S.Patent Office, and contenta copyrighted 1947 by the Desert Press, Inc. Permission to reproducecontents must be secured from the editor in writing.RANDALL HENDERSON, Editor. BESS STACY, Business Manager.LUCILE HARRIS and HAROLD O. WEIGHT, Associate Editors.Unsolicited manuscripts and photographs submitted cannot be returned or acknowledgedunless full return postage is enclosed. Desert Magazine assumes no responsibility for damageor loss of manuscripts or photographs although due care will be exercised. Subscribers shouldsend notioe of change of address by the first of the month preceding issue. If address is un-certain by that date, notify circulation department to hold copies.SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One Year
. . . $3.00 Two years . . .
$5.00Canadian
subscriptions 25c extra, foreign 50c extra.Subscriptions to
Army
personnel outside U.S.A. must be mailed in conformity withP.O.D. Order No. 19687.
Address correspondence to Desert Magazine, 636 State Street, El Centro, California.
FEBRUARY, 1947

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