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3-27-14

3-27-14

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Published by: The University Daily Kansan on Apr 02, 2014
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Even with one parking ticket, it’s now possible or students to keep a perect record with the launch o the Parking icket Forgiveness Quiz earlier this week.Within 10 business days o receiving a first-time parking ticket, students now have the chance to clear their names with an online quiz o 20 multiple choice questions. Afer completion, the quiz is sent to KU Parking & ransit or review within five business days.“It’s an extension o our appeal process that makes it a more positive interaction,” said Margretta de Vries, an administrative proessional with KU Parking & ransit. “We’re ofen viewed as the bad guys on campus.”Parking ticket orgiveness only applies to a first offense, while the appeal process is available or anybody or any citation within 10 days o receiving a ticket.Last year, 33,990 parking tickets were issued, totaling $818,665. de Vries said the quiz was designed to teach students how to park on campus to prevent uture tickets. It’s intended to be educational and interactive, keeping students up-to-date on parking rules and regulations across campus. Even students not issued tickets are encouraged to brush up on their knowledge.Te quiz covers all topics regarding parking, but only Group 1 violations are eligible or clearance. Tese include parking without a permit in a restricted zone, improper permit display and parking over the stall lines.It takes about 20 minutes, and nearly every question offers a hint with a hyperlink directing users to the related section o the rules and regulations with the correct answer. Questions can be answered multiple times until the student scores 100 percent. A brie explanation is included once the correct answer is chosen. “A lot o rustration is due to a lack o knowledge about parking options that exist,” said Sarah Coughlan, an administrative assistant with KU Parking & ransit. “Te questions will give people the opportunity to amiliarize themselves with our website and learn more.de Vries said she doesn’t know how many tickets might be canceled yet, because the ocus has been on the educational and unctional aspects o the quiz instead.Parking icket Forgiveness was originally an Ad Astra platorm last year, and a current initiative o Student Senate. Members worked closely with the parking and technology departments.“We were pleased to work with KU student leaders and KU Parking & ransit on this student-initiated project,” said Bob Lim, chie inormation officer. “Tese types o collaborative projects between student government and University departments show KU’s commitment to a welcoming campus environment or students.As o Wednesday, five people have taken the quiz since it was added to Parking’s appeal page on March 14. o take the quiz yoursel and learn more about parking rules and regulations,  visit www.parking.ku.edu/appeals.
— Edited by Julie Etzler 
Volume 126 Issue 97
kansan.com
 Thursday, March 27, 2014
UDK
the student voice since 1904
 
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2014 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 2BCROSSWORD 5ACRYPTOQUIPS 5AOPINION 4ASPORTS 1BSUDOKU 5A
Scattered T-Storms, 60 percent chance of rain. Wind SW at 25 mph.
Check your enrollment date.
IndexDon’t ForgetToday’s Weather
I am the one who thunders.
HI: 67LO: 33
KU Parking launches parking ticket forgiveness quiz 
AMELIA ARVESEN
news@kansan.com 
“It’s an extension of our appeal process that makes it a more positive interaction. We’re often viewed as the bad guys on campus.”MARGRETTA DE VRIESKU Parking & Transit adminsitrative professional
STUDYING: ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES 
Student Senate Student Rights Committee chairSigma Pi fraternity memberStudents for a Sustainable Future member
STUDYING: JOURNALISM 
Legal Services for Students Marketing InternMuslim Student Association member
CRIMSON AND TRUE PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: KEVIN HUNDELT
CRIMSON AND TRUE VICE PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: SARA ANEES
TURN TO PAGE 3A FOR A BIOGRAPHY ABOUT BOTH CANDIDATES 
Crimson and True candidates gear up for election 
STUDENT SENATECAMPUS
Chancellor addresses master plan, athletics fee, grad student insurance
EMILY DONOVAN
news@kansan.com 
Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little discussed a number o University-related issues on Wednesday, including the the master plan, the student athletic ee and the budget.
THE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN 
Te fifh master plan was unveiled on March 14, which includes projects to improve and expand science buildings and enhance the beauty o campus over the next decade.“Te excitement is that it has all these possibilities, but the challenge is how to get there and how to get the resources to get there,” Gray-Little said.Te University has already started implementing the plan with the construction o new student housing, the business school building renovations and renovations to Jayhawk Boulevard. Tey are also planning to build an energy and environment center.
STUDENT ATHLETIC FEE 
Earlier in the week, Gray-Little received the Student Senate resolution to cut the student athletic ee. She plans to review the proposal and respond in the near uture.She said the ee originated in a series o agreements made between the athletics department, the student body and previous chancellors to target things like student recreation center payments, athletic tickets and support or student athletes. Te ee currently gives Athletics around $1.2 million a year, but Gray-Little said it’s hard to determine how much o this amount Athletics is receiving directly, because the department is also paying or the recreation center expansion.“I’ll take into consideration the contractual agreements that Student Senate had with Athletics or sure, and the rec center expansion and things like that,” Gray-Little said.
BUDGET TALKS 
Te senate and the house are currently working to pass a budget that the chancellor expects would restore some o the salary cuts made in 2013. However, the chancellor does not believe that the ederal FICA reund will be returned. Te reund, which comes rom paying unnecessary social security tax rom previous years, would have been used to help build a new medical building at the KU Medical Center.“Generally there has been an unwillingness [in the senate] to return the FICA money, which would be really critical to getting that done,” Gray-Little said.In addition, unding or a translational chemical biology institute, which was recommended by the governor as the University’s major project that would contribute scientifically and economically to the community, does not have much support, but the University is working to prove the project’s importance.“Te CBI is exactly the kind o project and effort that we are being encouraged to do, where you have work that is research that also has the potential oreconomic benefit or the area,”Gray-Little said.
SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY 
Te Kansas Board o Regents’workgroup passed a new
MCKENNA HARFORD
news@kansan.com 
FILE PHOTO/KANSAN
Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little addressed several issues on Wednes-day, including the campus master plan and the student athletic fee.
SEE CAMPUS PAGE 3
“The excitement is that it has all these possibilities, but the challenge is how to get there and how to get the resources to get there.”BERNADETTE GRAY-LITTLEChancellor
FILE PHOTO/KANSAN
Parking tickets are common occurrences for students who misunderstand the parking restrictions on campus.
 
Student Affairs surprised outstanding seniors with University awards this week. Other students who received awards are Emily Frese, Tyler Wright, Lindsey Mayfield, Sam Logan, Anahita Khanlari, Alexandra Null and Dat Hoang.
What:
 Remembering Mandela: Legacies and Liberation Struggles
When:
3 to 4 p.m.
Where:
 Sabatini Multicultural Resource Center
About:
 A panel discussion with South African Scholars Hannah Britton, Surendra Bhana, Lorraine Haricombe and Elene Cloete.
What:
Employment Topic Workshop:  Job Search Strategies for Interna-tional Students
When:
3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Where:
149
Burge UnionAbout: Tips and strategies for international students looking for a job in the United States.
What:
 Lunch Talk: National Endow-ment for the Humanities Funding Opportunities for Digital Projects
When:
Noon to 2 p.m.
Where:
 Hall Center Seminar Room
About:
 Perry Collins will speak about funding opportunities. Lunch will be served, and an RSVP is required.
What:
 Is There an American Dream for You? How Institutional Failure Perpetuates Poverty
When:
Noon to 2 p.m.
Where:
 Woodruff Auditorium, Kansas Union
About:
 Part of a speaker series about poverty. RSVP at reimaginingpoverty.com.
What:
 Flapjacks for Philanthropy
When:
 8 a.m. to noon
Where:
 Eaton Hall
About:
 Proceeds from the all-you-can-eat pancake and sausage break-fast coordinated by students in the Self Engineering Leadership Fellows Program will go to charity. Advance tickets will be sold at a reduced price.
What:
 Soweto Gospel Choir
When:
 7:30 p.m.
Where:
 Lied Center
About:
The South African choir will sing traditional and popular African and international gospel music. Tick-ets are $10 to $14 for students and children, and $20 to $28 for adults.
What:
 KU School of Music Visiting Artist Series: Corpus Trombone Quartet
When:
 7:30 p.m.
Where:
 Swarthout Recital Hall
About:
 This event is free to the public.
Calendar
Thursday, March 27Friday, March 28Saturday, March 29Sunday, March 30
NEWS MANAGEMENTEditor-in-chief
Katie Kutsko
Managing editor – production
Allison Kohn
Managing editor – digital media
Lauren Armendariz
Associate production editor
Madison Schultz
Associate digital media editor
Will Webber
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENTAdvertising director
Sean Powers
Sales manager
Kolby Botts
Digital media and sales manager
Mollie Pointer
NEWS SECTION EDITORSNews editor
Emma LeGault
Associate news editor
Duncan McHenry
Sports editor
Blake Schuster
Associate sports editor
Ben Felderstein
Entertainment editor
Christine Stanwood
Special sections editor
Dani Brady
Head copy chief
Tara Bryant
Copy chiefs
Casey HutchinsHayley JozwiakPaige Lytle
Design chiefs
Cole AnnebergTrey Conrad
Designers
Ali SelfClayton RohlmanHayden Parks
Opinion editor
Anna Wenner
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Associate photo editor
Michael Strickland
ADVISERS Media director and content strategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
 Jon Schlitt
THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014PAGE 2A
CONTACT US
editor@kansan.comwww.kansan.comNewsroom: (785) 766-1491Advertising: (785) 864-4358Twitter: @KansanNewsFacebook: facebook.com/thekansanThe University Daily Kansan is the student newspaper of the University of Kansas. The first copy is paid through the student activity fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are 50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased at the Kansan business office, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045. The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967) is published daily during the school year except Friday, Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and exams and weekly during the summer session excluding holidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are $250 plus tax. Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue.
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check out KUJH-TV on Wow! of Kansas Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what you’ve read in today’s Kansan and other news. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.KJHK is the student voice in radio. Whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll or reggae, sports or special events, KJHK 90.7 is for you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center 1000 Sunnyside Avenue Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather
,
Jay?
What’s the
— weather.com 
SATURDAY
HI: 61LO: 37
Sunny. Zero percent chance of rain. Wind WSW at 11 mph.
Blue sky.
FRIDAY
HI: 52LO: 30
Showers. 30 percent chance of rain. Wind NNE at 9 mph.
Remember my rain.
SUNDAY
HI: 77LO: 44
Cloudy. Zero percent chance of rain. Wind SSW at 24 mph.
Heisen-cloud.
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
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CAMPUS
Seniors receive University awards 
PAIGE STINGLEY
news@kansan.com 
Tyler Childress 
Award:
 
Rusty Leffel Con-cerned Student Award
Hometown:
 Coffeyville
Major:
 Sociology and Political Science
 
Tyler is the president of his pre-law fraternity, a member of Mortar Board — a community service organization for seniors — and a volunteer for Big Brothers Big Sisters. Childress is a member of numerous honors societies and is the Student Senate chief of staff.“I’m really humbled and honored knowing that, out of my entire graduating class, I was selected for this award. It feels great to know that I’ve left my legacy.”Tyler will be attending law school in the fall.
Fun fact:
“During my fresh-man year I went to a Student Senate open forum meeting. I didn’t really think Senate was my thing, so I left. Even-tually I changed my mind, and it changed my life.”
Ben Jang 
Award:
 
Class of 1913 Award
Hometown:
 Olathe
Major:
 
Cellular Biology “I never expected to win, I just wanted to get my story out there about my time at KU and how it got me to where I am today. I was astounded.” Jang has been a teaching assistant for several classes, is a peer-led undergraduate supplements leader and is a coordinator at Jubilee Cafe.He will be attending The University of Kansas School of Medicine in the fall and wants to be a physician in the future.
Fun fact:
“I went skydiving last year.”
Addison Keegan-Harris 
Award:
 Donald K. Alderson Memorial Award
Hometown
: Topeka
Major:
 Applied Behavioral Science
Minor:
Leadership Studies Keegan-Harris was a resi-dent assistant for two years, a peer leadership consultant, orientation assistant, Hawk Week leader, E.X.C.E.L. final-ist and is on the Blueprints planning committee.“It’s never been about the accolades for me, but it is such a validating feeling to know that someone noticed my hard work. I am passionate about all of the things I participate in and it feels good to have that nice pat on the back. I feel really appreciated.” Addison will be working with the Kansas Women’s Leadership Institution after graduation. “It’s a good combination of everything I’m passionate about,” she said.
Fun fact:
“I’ve never broken a bone or had a bloody nose.”
Daniel Sanchez 
Award:
Alexis F. Dillard Student Involvement Award
Hometown:
 Lenexa
Major:
Spanish and Global and International Studies “It’s a huge honor to be recognized for this award. I am humbled that people thought of me as an ideal candidate. It feels good knowing that I made my mark on the University.”Sanchez is a member of Alpha Tau Omega, is part of the 2014 Homecoming Steering Committee and participates in SUA, Center for Community Outreach, Mentors in the Lives of Kids (MILK) and the Hispanic American Leadership Organiza-tion (HALO).After college, he plans on finding a job in New York City.
Fun fact:
 “When I was little I had severe epilepsy. The doc-tors didn’t think I was going to survive. That just shows how far I’ve come.”
— Edited by Katie Gilbaugh 
 Autumn Smith 
Award:
Kathryn Nemeth Tuttle Student Scholar Award
Hometown:
 Lewis
Major:
 Cellular Biology Smith is the president of All Scholarship Hall Council. She is an active member in Na-tional Residence Hall Honorary and Golden Key International Honors Society, and she volunteers with the Peer Health Advisors in Watkins Memorial Health Center.“This is actually amazing to me because the scholarship is for a scholarship-hall student. It feels amazing knowing that the community I live in recognizes the work I do. I have also worked with Kathryn Tuttle before, so it’s an honor to receive her award.”After graduation, Smith will attend The University of Kan-sas School of Medicine where she will study Rural Family Practice.
 Fun fact:
“I have a condition called syndactyly, which means I only have eight toes.”
 
People with O- blood types are universal donors, but can only receive O- blood. People with AB+ blood types are universal recipients but can only donate to those with AB+ blood types. The KU Blood Drive is going on next week in the KS Union and other campus locations.
THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014PAGE 3ATHE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
CHECK OUT KANSAN.COM FOR ANUPDATE ON THE CRISIS IN SYRIA
Meet the Crimson and True candidates 
Sara Anees’ ather is a traditional Pakistani man: quiet and reserved. It’s hard or her to hear about her ather’s struggles against discrimination when he chose to attend college in the United States. “Tat makes me treasure what it is I have here so much more,” Anees said about her time at the University. When she meets international students on campus, she can’t help but associate their struggles with her ather’s.Anees, a junior rom Wichita, wants to bring changes to campus that will impact people who she said haven’t really had a  voice in Student Senate.As a Pakistani-American, Anees said she doesn’t meet many other student senators who are Muslim. She wants to establish reflection rooms on campus where anyone can relieve stress and Muslim students can pray throughout the day.“Especially or students like me who have to pray five times a day and can’t because it’s structurally impossible — unless you want to pray in the hallway — (reflection rooms) would be really useul,” she said. “It’s hard because you don’t want to ask or those types o things.”Anees got involved in Senate hoping to make a difference in students’ lives.“Student Senate helped me to get a large perspective on what students do here,” she said.She admires student organizations like the Sailing Club and the ightrope Walking Club. Anees was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in eighth grade. Tere are cold days when she wakes up and her body is tense and sore, but she fights through how hard it is to move. She said this makes her appreciate how much work students put into perecting skills like tightrope walking.“I’ve had a different background,” Anees said. “Because o that, I’ve had to open my eyes and see how other people live.”
— Edited by Blair Sheade 
Kevin Hundelt calls himsel a momma’s boy.His mom is a social worker with Catholic nonprofits. He said his parents have been role models throughout his lie, teaching him to stay humble and work hard.Hundelt, a junior rom St. Louis, wants to guide Student Senate to realization change. He said he sees too much argument between senators or too little progress, and wants to guide Senate to ocus on the student body.“Sometimes, how we argue can be a little pedantic,” he said.Hundelt wants to host workshops to help senators collaborate.“Tere are some egos in Student Senate,” he said. “What I could do is be an example o what everyone could be.”Hundelt has loved being involved with Senate rom his first experience. At his first Student Rights committee meeting, he watched a heated debate to prevent a revision that would have allowed officials to enter dormitory rooms without the resident’s consent or a warrant.He remembers being inspired by how passionate senators are about deending students’ best interests.Hundelt wants to be the voice o students, trying to work or their best interests by putting himsel in others’ shoes. He asks himsel how a proposal would benefit average students.Afer graduation, Hundelt wants to work in urban planning in his home city. He wants to help the community in St. Louis at a structural level.“Tose people in St. Louis deserve better,” he said. “It’s wrong that they don’t have the high quality o lie that I had in the suburbs.
— Edited by Blair Sheade 
SARA ANEESKEVIN HUNDELT
 version o the social media policy at the beginning o the month that changed the language o the policy to address aculty concerns about academic reedom.“My hopes have to do with the response, rather than the document itsel — that is, we are able to get to a document that satisfies the Regents and also the members o the University communities,” Gray-Little said.Te final policy will be recommended to the Board on April 16.
INSURING GRADUATE STUDENTS 
An issue that has recently become a topic o concern and discussion or the administration and graduate students is the Affordable Care Act’s provision that employees who work over 30 hours a week must be insured by their employer. Due to graduate students’ concerns that there will be a reduction in the number o hours they are allowed to work and University concerns about cost, administrators have begun talking about a solution.“We are looking at what are the consequences o the Affordable Care Act provisions and how it will affect graduate students and how will it affect the University and how can we get to a point that is not harmul to the graduate students,” Gray-Little said.
— Edited by Alec Weaver 
CAMPUS FROM PAGE
1A
STUDENT SENATE
Kansas House rejects plan for energy rules
TOPEKA — A measure to repeal the state’s 2009 renewable en-ergy standards for power gener-ation was rejected Wednesday in the Kansas House despite critics who argued the requirements drive up utility bills and unfairly push one industry over another.The 77-42 vote was one of two procedural votes to reject the measure that was approved 25-15 by the Senate on Tuesday. The bill had the backing of the Kan-sas Chamber of Commerce and small-government groups who oppose government mandates.The standards require utility companies to provide 20 per-cent of their electricity from re-newable sources by 2020. They were put in place in 2009 when legislators allowed the construc-tion of a coal-fired power plant in southwest Kansas as part of a trade-off struck by then-Gov. Mark Parkinson and power plant supporters. The plant has been stalled by legal and regulatory challenges and is yet to be con-structed near an existing plant in Holcomb.Critics argued Wednesday that the energy standards are unnec-essary and lead to higher utility rates, as much as 22 percent since the standards were put in place.“I support wind energy. What I don’t support is the mandate,” said Rep. Randy Garber, a Sa-betha Republican who made the motion to agree with the repeal. “I support choice, free choice.”Supporters say the standards promote economic growth.
STATE SENATE
Coalition referendum discussion continues
The Student Rights and Univer-ity Affairs committees of Student enate voted for the creation of a new bill on Wednesday night re-garding the coalition referendum introduced in the last full meeting before break.If passed on the floor, the refer-ndum would be included on this ear’s ballot, giving students a hance to voice what they think about the current coalition system based on the question, “Should oalitions be prohibited from orming and campaigning for tudent Senate elections?”“I can say that there are stu-dents put off by Student Senate because of coalitions,” said Mar-us Tetwiler, student body presi-dent.He said including the referen-dum on the ballot may lead to a greater voting participation from tudents in the election looking to provide input. During the discussion in the tudent Rights Committee, the question was raised whether the wording of the petition would be considered non-binding or bind-ing. If binding, this means the 2014-2015 Student Senate would be forced to create a bill based off the results of the student vote. Tetwiler was hesitant to refer to it as a binding referendum. He interpreted the wording as non-binding, and said he wants students’ answers to be consid-ered as data collection for the future senate’s use rather than something that calls for direct action. A University Affairs committee member asked whether the third option “other” would be included on the ballot to allow students to provide comments.“A clear set in stone yes and no is more effective, but that’s my opinion,” Tetwiler said. “It makes it more clear to hone in on data.”The conversation is slated to continue in next week’s full stu-dent senate meeting.
— Amelia Arvesen and Miranda Davis 

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