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04-03-14

04-03-14

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Afer much debate, the ull Student Senate voted against the petition to include the student body in deciding whether coalitions should or should not be eliminated. Te members voted at 11:45 p.m. on Wednesday during the final weekly meeting o the semester.Te reerendum will not be included on the ballot next week, limiting students’ chance to provide input about the current coalition system.“I academically understand why people did that because, politically, people will never give anyone else the opportunity to eliminate that, which preserves their power,” said Emma Halling, student body vice president.She said she supported the reerendum to give students a chance to voice their opinions and ound it “cowardly” that senators voted to prevent a popular vote.Law senator Mark Savoy said he observed a split between coalitions represented in the room. Based on the raised hands, he said Grow KU members seemed to be in avor o the petition while Jayhawkers members opposed it.“In no way was this something we coordinated,” said MacKenzie Oatman, Jayhawkers’ presidential candidate. “Tere were Jayhawkers that voted or and against it, as well as the other coalitions.”Oatman, who was not in the ull meeting but who had previously attended meetings where this reerendum was introduced, said she welcomes the opportunity to present the student body with a choice, as long as they are properly inormed about coalitions.Many student senators against the petition thought the student body should be better educated about the role o coalitions. Other dissenters questioned whether the reerendum was binding in addition to its restrictions on the right to assembly.“Can you speak on the implication o a possible no  vote to this question and its conflict with a reedom to assemble or associate in this country?” said Ryan Moulder, a graduate student rom Liberty, Mo.Savoy responded that restricting reedom o assembly was his greatest concern when the resolution was first introduced. In previous meetings, he has mentioned he voted in avor o keeping coalitions at that time or the reedom o assembly.“Tat being said, I think that student’s speech is curtailed  very narrowly by not allowing their opinions to be heard about coalitions,” Savoy said.Halling said i the petition had passed, the constitutionality questions could be directed to a legal department beore introducing the reerendum on the ballot. Students will not have the opportunity to choose whether or not to keep coalitions, or leave the option blank on the ballot.Voting or student body president and vice president takes place on April 9 and 10.
— Edited by Blair Sheade and Paige Lytle 
Starting this month, the University and Energy Solutions Proessionals (ESP), whose goal according to its site is to provide “exceptional energy-efficiency and acility-improvement solutions”, are pushing the University to “go green” with a new energy policy and a little help rom a group o University engineering students.Te ESP and the University have worked together since 2008 to implement energy policies on campus. Previously, ESP worked with the University to hold energy conservation competitions between the 39 main buildings on campus. Te competition lasted a couple o months, and the purpose was to make certain buildings more energy efficient.Afer deciding the competition wasn’t as effective as they had hoped, a “grading system” to promote energy efficiency is being put into place this month.“We eel that this is a more effective way to encourage behavioral changes when it comes to energy conservation,” said Kristina Beverlin, a ormer KU student and Energy Auditor or ESP.Te grading system is separated into lab areas and individual temperature controls. Each is based off 100 points. Fume hoods are one o the main ocuses o the grading o buildings with a lab setting. When experimenting with chemicals that are dangerous to breathe, researchers use ume hoods. Te experimenter stands at the hood and mixes chemicals inside, allowing the  vapors to be released outside.“Because ume hoods are always running, they are very energy intensive. In order to be efficient they need to remain closed. When lefopen, the average ume hood costs $2,600 per year to run,” Beverlin explained. “Tere are 422 ume hoods in the 39 core buildings that are audited. I they were all lef open, it would cost $1,097,200 in energy costs.”For example, in lab areas, ume hoods should not be open more than our inches, according to Beverlin. For every 1 percent o the total ume hood sashes that are lefopen in a given building, one point will be deducted. Other points will be deducted or lights lef on, number o total coffee machines, projectors that are lef running, windows and doors that are lef open, computers lef in “sleep” mode,  just to name a ew.“Since each department is different, there is not a set o rules,” Beverlin said. “Instead, we’re grading on how energy efficient each building is. It will encourage different departments within each building to work together.”Te grades or each building will be made public on the KU Sustainability website, which Beverlin hopes will be an incentive or the 39 core buildings to remain energy conscious.George Werth, campus energy engineer, thinks a greener campus can be realistically achieved through this grading system.“I believe everyone on campus would like to see a more efficient and environmentally riendly way o operating our campus,” Werth said. “Te new grading system is the way to start.”Emily Cook, a junior rom Olathe, decided she wanted to help the University be more energy efficient afer going on a trip to Costa Rica with the GREEN program (Global Renewable Energy Education Networking Program) over this past winter break.“Costa Rica is run 99 percent off o renewable energy. When I returned to America and to the new semester, I started asking questions about how KU uses energy and how KU wastes energy,” Cook said. “I wanted to find out i there was a way or me, an environmental engineering student, to help KU be more energy efficient.”Afer meeting with Werth and Jeff Severin, director o the Center o Sustainability, Cook gathered a group o 13 engineering students to perorm energy audits.“We just got started and I’m excited to see where this group goes and what inormation we gather,” Cook said.Cook said that she and the other 13 students will determine more o the behavioral side o energy waste — i lights were lef on, windows open, projectors on, etc. Teir goal is to help educate students and aculty on campus about simply turning off lights and electronics to save money.“’I’ve also been talking to some other administrators about the possibility o renewable energy on campus. Energy waste is an issue that students and proessors can directly change,” she said. “Tis is an exciting time or KU in regards to sustainability; there seems to be a greater push rom students to make KU more ‘green.’ I want to help make it happen.”Severin says that with the money saved through a greener campus, the campus could cut costs on utilities as well as help purchase more energy-efficient equipment.
— Edited by Alec Weaver 
UDK
the student voice since 1904
 
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
Volume 126 Issue 101
kansan.com
 Thursday, April 3, 2014
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2014 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 2BCROSSWORD 5ACRYPTOQUIPS 5AOPINION 4ASPORTS 1BSUDOKU 5A
Cloudy. 20 percent chance of rain. Wind SSW at 20 mph.
To watch the Student Senate debate tonight.
IndexDon’t ForgetToday’s Weather
April is the cruelest month.
HI: 70LO: 36
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Student Body President Marcus Tetwiler walks behind Student Senators during last night’s senate meeting. It was Senate’s last full senate meeting of the semester.
Coalition referendum will not be included on this year’s ballot 
AMELIA ARVESEN
news@kansan.com 
BRENT BURFORD/KANSAN
The University and Energy Solutions Professionals have developed a grading system for sustainability on cam-pus in an attempt to “go green.” Fume hoods, such as this one, that are left open will result in deducted points.
ENVIRONMENT
Campus sustainability to be enforced with ‘green grades’
 
MADDIE FARBER
news@kansan.com 
“I believe everyone on cam-pus would like to see a more efficient and environmentally friendly way of operating our campus.”GEORGE WERTHCampus energy engineer
What to expect from tonight’s Student Senate debate
The Student Senate spring elections debate will take place tonight from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in the Kansas Union’s Alderson Auditorium. Presidential and Vice Presidential candidates from the three contesting coa-litions — Grow KU, Jayhawkers and Crimson & True — will give statements and answer ques-tions.A panel of student journalists from KJHK, KUJH and the Uni-versity Daily Kansan will ask questions along with modera-tor and Chair of the Elections Commission Jake Rapp. For the first 30 minutes, after opening statements, VP candidates will address platform-specific questions prepared by student journalists. Presidential candi-dates will then respond to gen-eral panel questions and topics gathered from social media via “#KUSenateDebate” before and during the debate for the final hour. Attendees may also sub-mit a question as they arrive.According to the Elections Commission’s debate rules, co-alition members will generally have two minutes to answer di-rect questions and one minute to respond to or rebut an oppo-nent’s remarks. The moderator will enforce this time limit by showing a “stop card,” indicat-ing the speaker must end his/ her remarks within 10 seconds, which will ensure all candidates have equal speaking opportuni-ties.KUJH live event coverage will begin streaming online 15 min-utes prior to the start and will continue throughout the event. Commission debate rules also prohibit campaign banners, signs, handouts or other such items in the debate hall. The audience is asked not to ap-plaud or vocally show support or opposition for a candidate.
— Duncan McHenry 
VISIT KANSAN.COM FOR DIGITAL COVERAGE OF THE SENATE DEBATE TONIGHT
 
Seven Black Hawk helicopters will touch down on West Campus today, i the weather permits.Te Kansas Army National Guard pilots will be here to pick up the KU Army ROC cadets or a weekend training at Fort Riley. Having special permission rom the city and the University, the helicopters will land on the Shenk Sports Complex, located at 23rd and Iowa.It’s the first time the Black Hawks will actually fly over campus, said Howard ing, a senior rom Galloway, N.J. Usually, the helicopters use the Lawrence airport, but with special permission rom the city and the University, the helicopters will fly in ormation overhead as they come pick the cadets up or training. Te Combined Field raining Exercise is an opportunity or KU Army ROC to train with cadets rom neighboring schools. “Basically we play Army and learn how the procedures in the Army are, how to ollow orders and keep track o orders. It’s like a small deployment,” said William rout, a reshman Army ROC cadet rom Basehor. “It’s a really good opportunity to learn, and you learn by trial and error, like you would in a real situation.It will include patrol training in various settings, night and land navigation courses at Fort Riley, as well as pre-flight training on-site on boarding and dismounting the aircrafsaely. With 125 cadets participating in training, the Black Hawks will actually make two trips to transport the cadets, at 1 and 3 p.m. Anyone can come by to watch the Black Hawks land and take off. Families o the cadets are also invited to see their children aboard the Black Hawk. “For us, it’s just how you get rom point A to point B in the real Army, so we are practicing that,” rout said. “But it’s also kind o cool to roll out in aBlack Hawk.Spectators are not allowed on the field or saety, but can stay in an area next to the parking lot off Crestline Drive andClinton Parkway.
— Edited by Brook Barnes 
What:
 Human Migration Lecture
Series:
 Chickens coming “home to roost”: U.S. Policy Spurring Mexican and Central American Migration
When:
 Noon to 1 p.m.
Where:
 Spooner Hall, The CommonsThe Department of Anthropology brings the latest lecture exploring human migration from social, eco-nomic, demographic and biological perspectives. Free to attend.
What:
 Ecology Seminar: John Head, University of Kansas
When:
 12:15 p.m. to 1:15 p.m.
Where:
 130 Higuchi Biosciences Center
About:
 A seminar from the Depart-ment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology titled “Global Legal Regimes to Protect the World’s Grasslands.”
What:
5th Annual Mid-America Humanities Conference
When:
 Noon to 5:30 p.m.
Where:
 Kansas Union
About:
A conference for under-graduate and graduate research sponsored by the Humanities and Western Civ. program. Also takes place on Friday, April 4, from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the Kansas Union.
What:
Subversive play in the classroom: The power of immersion in learning
When:
Noon to 1 p.m.
Where:
 135 Budig Hall
About:
 A seminar with Peter Felten of Elon University and Leslie Tuttle of the KU Department of History. Attendance is free, and lunch will be provided if registered by April 2. To register, email cte@ku.edu.
What:
Graduate Research/Write-In
When:
 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Where:
 Watson Library, 4th Floor
About:
The KU Writing Center presents an intensive day of writing in Watson Library. Workshops and one-on-one sessions with a research librarian or writing consultant will be available.
What:
 More Than You Know: A Helen Morgan Cabaret
When:
7:30 p.m.
Where:
Robert Baustian Theatre, Murphy Hall
About:
 In a special benefit perfor-mance for the Friends of the Theatre (FROTH) Student Enrichment Fund, Lauren Stanford, KU alumna and 2013 Metrostar winner, returns to Murphy Hall for one night.
What
: Kansas Virtuosi Concert
When:
7:30 p.m.
Where:
 Swarthout Recital Hall, Murphy Hall
About:
 A musical showcase fea-turing KU School of Music faculty artists. Event is free and open to the public.
Calendar
Thursday, April 3Friday, April 4Saturday, April 5Sunday, April 6
NEWS MANAGEMENTEditor-in-chief
Katie Kutsko
Managing editor – production
Allison Kohn
Managing editor – digital media
Lauren Armendariz
Associate production editor
Madison Schultz
Associate digital media editor
Will Webber
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENTAdvertising director
Sean Powers
Sales manager
Kolby Botts
Digital media and sales manager
Mollie Pointer
NEWS SECTION EDITORSNews editor
Emma LeGault
Associate news editor
Duncan McHenry
Sports editor
Blake Schuster
Associate sports editor
Ben Felderstein
Entertainment editor
Christine Stanwood
Special sections editor
Dani Brady
Head copy chief
Tara Bryant
Copy chiefs
Casey HutchinsHayley JozwiakPaige Lytle
Design chiefs
Cole AnnebergTrey Conrad
Designers
Ali SelfClayton RohlmanHayden Parks
Opinion editor
Anna Wenner
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Associate photo editor
Michael Strickland
ADVISERS Media director and content strategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
 Jon Schlitt
THURSDAY, APRIL 3, 2014PAGE 2A
CONTACT US
editor@kansan.comwww.kansan.comNewsroom: (785) 766-1491Advertising: (785) 864-4358Twitter: @KansanNewsFacebook: facebook.com/thekansanThe University Daily Kansan is the student newspaper of the University of Kansas. The first copy is paid through the student activity fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are 50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased at the Kansan business office, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045. The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967) is published daily during the school year except Friday, Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and exams and weekly during the summer session excluding holidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are $250 plus tax. Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue.
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check out KUJH-TV on Wow! of Kansas Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what you’ve read in today’s Kansan and other news. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.KJHK is the student voice in radio. Whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll or reggae, sports or special events, KJHK 90.7 is for you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center 1000 Sunnyside Avenue Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather
,
Jay?
What’s the
— weather.com 
SATURDAY
HI: 61LO: 40
Cloudy. Zero percent chance of rain. Wind SSE at 10 mph.
Waited for rain.
FRIDAY
HI: 54LO: 30
Partly cloudy. Zero percent chance of rain. Wind WNW at 23 mph.
Hurry up spring, it’s time.
SUNDAY
HI: 66LO: 39
Cloudy. Zero percent chance of rain. Wind SE at 12 mph.
While black clouds gathered.
N
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“It’s a really good opportunity to learn, and you learn by trial and error, like you would in a real situation.”WILLIAM TROUTBasehor freshman
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO BY HOWARD TING
KU Army ROTC UA-60 Black Hawks during a landing exercise at Fort Riley. The Black Hawks’ crewmembers are from the 1-108th Aviation Unit of Kansas Army National Guard.
 
Kansas legislators are hoping to have a budget proposal to discuss beore Friday, when they will break or three weeks. Administration is currently working to insure that all o the University o Kansas’ priorities will be included in the budget, including unding or a ranslational Chemical Biology Institute (CBI) and restitution o the 2013 salary capture.Currently, the house budget is more generous to the University because it includes unding or the CBI, which the senate budget doesn’t. Te University is working to make sure that the final budget is as close to the Governor’s budget, which included the CBI unding, as possible.“Te CBI is really important or companies who want to engage with workers,” said im Caboni,  vice chancellor or public affairs. “It will attract outside companies and resources, which is good or Lawrence. It’s good or KU and it’s good or Kansas.”Te restitution o the salary capture is currently part o both the House and Senate budgets, which would help alleviate some o the cutbacks in the medical center.Another priority or the University is the unding or the medical education building, which is part o the Health Education Initiative to train more doctors to combat the shortage in Kansas. Without state unding and Federal Insurance Contribution Act (FICA) reunds, the building wouldn’t be possible and training more doctors would be difficult because the current acilities don’t have up-to-date equipment.“Basically the School o Medicine underwent reaccreditation and they ound that the space was not adequate or the medical education curriculum,” said Glen Cox, senior associate dean or medical education. “We want to build a home or truly interdisciplinary, interproessional health education.”Te main challenge that the budget aces is the recent court ruling or equal unding in K-12 schools, which might be addressed by seizing the FICA reunds.However, Caboni is hopeul that the legislators will see the importance o the new medical building or students and or Kansans.“I’m hopeul that olks see what having a well-unded research institute will do or Kansas,” Caboni said.
— Edited by Chelsea Mies 
KU Info was re-introduced eight years ago today. Since that day, there have been more than a third of a million questions answered through your phone calls, texts, walk up questions, or online services.
THURSDAY, APRIL 3, 2014PAGE 3ATHE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
POLITICS
University hopes to receive project funding 
MCKENNA HARFORD
news@kansan.com 
The TCBI building would con-nect researchers with outside resources and companies to further research, which would boost the economyThe medical educational building would update the facilities and equipment that students use to train to become doctors, including simulation technologySalaries that were cut in 2013 would be restored
HOW THIS AFFECTS STUDENTS: 
“I’m hopeful that folks see what having a well-funded research institute will do for Kansas.”TIM CABONIVice chancellor for public affairs
ENVIRONMENT
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Follow @KansanNews on Twitter 
OPEKA — Secretary o State Kris Kobach pushed Kansas legislators Wednesday or an aggressive response to the U.S. government’s designation o the lesser prairie chicken as a threatened species, criticizing a committee or rejecting proposals to punish ederal employees attempting to manage the bird’s population.Kobach, a ormer law proessor, supports a bill declaring that the ederal government has no authority to regulate prairie chickens or their habitats in Kansas. He also backed making it a elony or a ederal employee to attempt to enorce any law, regulation or treaty dealing with the lesser prairie chicken or its larger and darker cousin, the greater prairie chicken.Te state Senate approved a bill containing both provisions in February, as the U.S. Fish and Wildlie Service considered the listing or the lesser prairie chicken. Te ederal agency announced its decision last week, prompting Kansas to join a ederal lawsuit filed by Oklahoma that challenges the process leading to the designation.Te Kansas House Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee this week jettisoned the provision allowing elony charges against ederal employees and an alternate proposal to fine them $100 or each enorcement attempt.Instead, the House committee’s version o the bill allows the attorney general to go to court to block ederal conservation efforts. Te House expects to debate the measure in late April or early May, afer lawmakers finish an annual spring break.Kobach confirmed he had a staffer or his re-election campaign tweet on Wednesday, “URGEN ALER - PRAIRIE CHICKEN BILL GUED! Call your state reps today.”“Te ability o the state to step in and deend Kansas landowners is now restricted,” Kobach told Te Associated Press. “It’s perplexing as to why they would do this.”
Kobach urges tough bill on prairie chickens
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kansas Wildlife and Parks Secretary Robin Jennison, left, discusses efforts states were making to boost lesser prairie chicken numbers before the federal government listed the bird as a threatened species, during a news conference with Gov. Sam Brownback, right, Friday, March 28, 2014, at the Statehouse in Topeka.

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