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The Rich Young Man.

The Rich Young Man.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY GEORGE HODGES



And when he was gone forth into the way there came one
running, and kneeled to him, and said, Good Master, what
shall I do that I may inherit eternal life ? Mark 10 : 17.
BY GEORGE HODGES



And when he was gone forth into the way there came one
running, and kneeled to him, and said, Good Master, what
shall I do that I may inherit eternal life ? Mark 10 : 17.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Apr 04, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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THE RICH YOUG MA. BY GEORGE HODGES And when he was gone forth into the way there came one running, and kneeled to him, and said, Good Master, what shall I do that I may inherit eternal life ? Mark 10 : 17. HE belonged to the privileged classes. The incident is described by three of the evan- gelists, and they all agree that he was rich, he had great possessions; one of them adds that he was a ruler, he had high position. He was young, too, and was making plans to live a larger life. He was looking out into the world with eager anticipation and en- thusiasm, making up his mind what great things he would do. The Master of men, the moment He saw him, loved him. There he came running and kneeled at Jesus' feet, and the Master looking down into his expectant eyes, loved him. Christ was in sympathy with young men ; He understood them. His intimate friends were young men. The Christian mis- sion, the supreme adventure of faith, the purpose to win the world and to bring its mighty kingdoms to the feet of Christ, was 139 140 THE HUMA ATUKE OF THE SAITS. undertaken by young men. The Master wel- comed this young man, holding out His hands.
 
The man had possessions and position but he was not therewith content. He was pro- foundly dissatisfied : dissatisfied with himself. He was living a pleasant life, but he had become aware that there was a pleasure which all his money could not purchase. There was a peace and joy of which he had faint, dis- tant glimpses in his dreams, and which he saw clearly shining in the face of Christ ; and he desired it. But the world could not give it to him. He was living a good life. In spite of the manifold temptations, which assail the rich as stoutly as they assail the poor, he was an up- right, clean, honest and honorable man. He kept the commandments. His conscience was congenial with the moral law. But even this, which is a true source of contentment, did not content him. He felt that somehow he lacked something. He perceived that there was a difference between his life and the life eternal. For the word " eternal," as he understood it, is not an adjective of time or place. It is an adjective of quality. The life which he desired was not simply a life everlasting, into THE KICK YOUG MA. 141 which he might presently enter by the gate of the grave. He did not look that far ahead. He was interested, as every healthy young man is, in the immediate present. What he wanted was a heavenly life, to-day and here.
 
Such a life would be eternal in the sense of being in accord with that which is eternal, and thus independent of passing chances and changes of good and evil fortune. It would be eternal because it would be fitted to go on without serious interruption into the life to come. Here, for example, is a house which is an impertinence in the landscape. It is so mani- festly cheap and temporary, and in its shape and color so out of harmony with the ground whereon it stands, that it is an affront to nature. Here is another house which is akin to all the hills and fields, strong as the rocks and apparently as lasting, belonging to the woods and meadows, brother to the trees, and looking as if God had made it and not man. You remember old cathedrals, over the sea, which have that eternal aspect. The differ- ence between such structures and the wooden lodging-houses which stand by the side of the country road in the neighborhood of the small station as one looks out of the car window, is elemental. It is like the difference be- 14:2 THE HUMA ATURE OF THE SAITS. tween the respectable life which the rich young man was living and the eternal life which he desired to live. His question suggests that he had already learned that life eternal is to be attained along the way of social service. " What good thing shall I do," he cries, " that I may have eternal life ? " It is possible that the good thing to which he expected the Master to direct him

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