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Intellectual Harmony.

Intellectual Harmony.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY HUGH SMITH CARPENTER.


THE relations of man's mind to his heart are subtle
and inexplicable. But they are so vital that no
treatise of the one can leave the other untouched.
Every religion is in some sort an education. Every
education is at least so far a religion as to determine
the thought-moulds, the mind-shapes into which, and
through which, spiritual forces shall make their way.
BY HUGH SMITH CARPENTER.


THE relations of man's mind to his heart are subtle
and inexplicable. But they are so vital that no
treatise of the one can leave the other untouched.
Every religion is in some sort an education. Every
education is at least so far a religion as to determine
the thought-moulds, the mind-shapes into which, and
through which, spiritual forces shall make their way.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Apr 06, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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ITELLECTUAL HARMOY. BY HUGH SMITH CARPETER. THE relations of man's mind to his heart are subtle and inexplicable. But they are so vital that no treatise of the one can leave the other untouched. Every religion is in some sort an education. Every education is at least so far a religion as to determine the thought-moulds, the mind-shapes into which, and through which, spiritual forces shall make their way. The proper balance has not been often sought, has not yet been settled. There are men whose religi- ous life has too little of a. studious and comprehensive theology. There are men whose religious life has too much. But we approach a period when the moral character of intellections, and the intellectual charac- ter of spiritual exercises, must be harmonized. The mass of men read more and reason more. Their char- 222 ITELLECTUAL HABMOY. acter is involved in their education. To the devel- opment of emotional character, there will be requi- site the order and the culture of a sound intelligence. It will therefore be no digression to look into the prospects and the place of this intelligence. Philoso- phies of Religion multiply and fail. But there is a Religion of Philosophy which will live and reign. There are certain conditions under which the mind of man can work to advantage. As these conditions fit our nature, and blend with one another, they estab- lish a true harmony of life. As they fit the race to fill its sphere, they constitute the vantage ground of thought. Thought is mind-motion — to us, then, in the strictest sense, it is mind-being. We can tell a
 
mind in motion, but we can not tell a mind in essence. In physics, the latest and most occult conclusion is, that motion is the ultimate of matter ; that is to say, when you have analyzed all ponderable substances to their imponderables, — you find that the secret forces which underlie and rule all organisms, the heat and light, the magnetism and the electricity, which we sometimes call laws, and sometimes substances, — disclose themselves to be motions, and disclose noth- ing further of themselves. And such an ultimate of natural law is an ultimate theology. For nature thus defines itself to be an obedience to God, and noth- ing else. ature is only action, — action that makes something out of nothing. Inquisitive science said, ITELLECTUAL HARMOY. 223  — ex nihilo nihil fit, — you can not make any thing out of nothing. Maturer, more transcendent science ex- claimed, The universe is only the visible garment which God invisible, is ever weaving for himself. Biper science next proceeded to say, — nothing is as in itself, but everywhere something is becoming. And diplomad, graduate, at length, science shall meekly say, All things are only in the making, — nihil fit sed ex nihilo,-^-nothing is made but from nothing. "We inquire, for example, what light is, and far upon the highest pinnacle of perception the astronomer lifts his dim glass to the sun to-day, and peers into the spheres, sending us this reply; — Light is only com- ing always, only floating and waving ; it is not a substance, but it is a shining; it is not a separate creation, it is an obeying impulse somewhere in cre- ation ; it is not a form, it is the gesture of some form invisible, the motion of some substance. It exists, as wind exists, as sound exists. Even now God is al- ways saying, — Let there be light, — and light is always being.
 
To-day, says science, coming down from its observ- atory, — to-day, as ever, there is no natural body vis- ible, but everywhere there is obedience to God. ow, in the same way that matter reveals itself to be motion physical, mind is disclosed as motion meta- physical. And in order to the full advantage of mind- motion, the perfection of mind-life, there must be in- 224 ITELLECTUAL HARMOY. duced its harmony with all existence, and its recog- nition of all law. It must be simple obedience — an obedience of the finite to the infinite, of the contin- gent to the absolute, of the individual to the univer- sal. There are obvious conditions of all mind work essential to its harmony. The ages bring them into view and within reach, as they make the coming age a vantage ground of mind. One is to know its na- ture, or a just humanity. Another is to know its place, or a spiritual materialism ; and both these de- pend upon the unobstructed reach the soul attains be- tween its now and its hereafter. By and by man will know manhood better, man- kind will understand humanity. The ancient chal- lenge was,— know thyself. The Scripture and the Christian challenge is, — which of you by taking thought can add one cubit to his stature ? But there aratwo kinds of study alternative among men. The one tries to disguise the mind ; the other, to discover it. There is a prevalent education which is only the furnishing or the putting on of stilts* There is much stilt walking learned in early life which is afterwards worn down on rocks and roads, unless, as sometimes happens, it snaps off sharply ia

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