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Ultimate Intent.

Ultimate Intent.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY HUGH SMITH CARPENTER.



INCESSANT, fresh creations from the hand of
God, incessantly extend the reference of his praise.
When we speak of his glory as displayed by his
works, we forget that ultimate glory which is yet to
be displayed. When we think of the Future, we do
not often think of the Future of Futures.
BY HUGH SMITH CARPENTER.



INCESSANT, fresh creations from the hand of
God, incessantly extend the reference of his praise.
When we speak of his glory as displayed by his
works, we forget that ultimate glory which is yet to
be displayed. When we think of the Future, we do
not often think of the Future of Futures.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Apr 06, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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ULTIMATE ITET. BY HUGH SMITH CARPETER. ICESSAT, fresh creations from the hand of God, incessantly extend the reference of his praise. When we speak of his glory as displayed by his works, we forget that ultimate glory which is yet to be displayed. When we think of the Future, we do not often think of the Future of Futures. Our far reach is only the proximate stage of his purpose. He plants his seed of truth, as we think, to gather his harvest of righteousness. But he sows and harvests, only to accumulate further seed, for a planting beyond. Even in the present world, every regenerate life has, as we see, its true transcendentalism. It is born and bred for further purpose. And this is the legitimate ULTIMATE ITET. 828 appeal for prompt and early faith. Within the cabinet of celestial curiosities, within the storehouse of the living God, there is a niche, a name, for every speci- men. In proportion to the breadth of compass is the minuteness of detail. Forest trees may have more or fewer leaves, but no forest leaf can dispense with one of its fibers. If you go into one of these wholesale commer- cial establishments, or vast, gigantic manufactories, you will find the assortment so accurate, that a little thing is sooner missed than it would be in a cramped and crowded shop of meager dimensions, where all is jumbled and uncertain. So in God's assortment of lives. His vastness of arrangement requires his exactness of minuteness. Every specimen, every life,
 
has its own bearing on the universe. The kind of religion that can be produced in the present state of the church could not be produced before, and can not be, by and by. What we could be, no one else can be. What we can do, no other can. It is vain, therefore, to mimic or to reproduce the past If there are to be revivals, they are to be new. If more true hearts shall enter the church, they will be like more children in the family, to be told apart, and just enough alike that they can be told apart. That is the progress of the church ; that is the reason why God values such petty, paltry specimens. 824 ULTIMATE ITET. But the reason is ulterior still. We call to mind its final reference. The souls that are illustrative speci- mens in the present, are to be memorial specimens, mementoes, in the future. All mysteries of this life resolve themselves by ref- erence. Most of what goes on here, has no meaning, no solution on the spot. Science, whether physical or moral, explains just so much of life here as you could explain of a table which you should see set out at an inn. You would say, — this is certainly for peo- ple who will eat and drink. They are to be nour- ished and strengthened for some work. Or you go further and say — these are travelers coming from the east and going to the west ; but who they are, and whither they go, is more than I can tell. So with life here in its provisioning stages. Suppose that you had the egg problem to solve in a state of ignorance. You see an egg lying there loosely in a nest. A strange conceit, you think, to
 
make it with so odd a shape, and so thin a shell, — a shell made just too hard to be relished, just too thin and brittle to be strong. By and by you encounter the hatching absurdity. A dull, meditative fowl sits there, and droops and broods, until you are tired of the case, and pronounce it a wasteful freak of nature. At length you find out the careful instinct and the nicety of law that framed that egg-shell for the coming bird, and filled it with his food, just enough, ULTIMATE ITET, 825 and tempered his beak to be strong enough, to break it just at such a time, and you admire the economy of ulterior uses. If our eyes were open, we should see that this oval globe is but an egg, and that what we call time, is but the incubation of eternity, and that what we call mys- tery, is but the motherliness and patient brooding of celestial love. And it is the ulterior destiny of this globe which scatters all difficulties, and dismisses every doubt ; a reference to which gives us clear vision. We have sometimes wished that we could stand outside and see it as a whole. It would be* a great thing to be far enough apart, as from a picture or a piece of work, and see how this planet looked among the stars ; for so we should acquire a notion of its rel- ative value. The law of relative existence,— of pur- pose, and ulterior bearing, is one which we perceive at a glance elsewhere. A child looks at the sun, and says at once, God made the sun to give us light by day. Is the child wrong ? But the astronomer goes further. He says, The sun is center of a system, and was made to reg-

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