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A Thanksgiving Sermon for National Blessings.

A Thanksgiving Sermon for National Blessings.

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Published by glennpease
By REV. SAMUEL DAVIES, A.M.,

PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY.





EZEKIEL xx. 43, 44. And there shall ye remember your
ways, and all your doings, wherein ye have been defiled ;
and ye shall loathe yourselves in your own sight, for all
your evils that ye have committed. And ye shall know
that I am the LORD, when I have wrought with you for
my name's sake, not according to your wicked ways, nor
according to your corrupt doings, ye house of Israel,
saith the Lord GOD.*
By REV. SAMUEL DAVIES, A.M.,

PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY.





EZEKIEL xx. 43, 44. And there shall ye remember your
ways, and all your doings, wherein ye have been defiled ;
and ye shall loathe yourselves in your own sight, for all
your evils that ye have committed. And ye shall know
that I am the LORD, when I have wrought with you for
my name's sake, not according to your wicked ways, nor
according to your corrupt doings, ye house of Israel,
saith the Lord GOD.*

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Published by: glennpease on Apr 07, 2014
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A THAKSGIVIG SERMO FOR ATIOAL BLESSIGS. By REV. SAMUEL DAVIES, A.M., PRESIDET OF THE COLLEGE OF EW JERSEY.EZEKIEL xx. 43, 44. And there shall ye remember your ways, and all your doings, wherein ye have been defiled ; and ye shall loathe yourselves in your own sight, for all your evils that ye have committed. And ye shall know that I am the LORD, when I have wrought with you for my name's sake, not according to your wicked ways, nor according to your corrupt doings, ye house of Israel, saith the Lord GOD.* I AM by no means fond of employing your sacred time in harangues upon political or military subjects ; and last Sunday I intended to touch upon them once for all, and then confine myself to the more important concerns of religion and eternity; but Providence has surprised us in one week with so many, and such important, turns in our favour, that loyalty, religion, and all the virtues of patriot- ism and Christianity united, require us to take grateful notice of them. Therefore, I beg an hour of your sacred time for this purpose. I need not tell you, what you already know, that Ticonderoga, Crown Point, and iagara, are in our possession ; nests of savages that had so long rav- aged our frontiers ; fortifications that had defied our ut- most efforts in I know not how many fruitless expeditions, and cost our country and nation so many thousands of money, and so many limbs and lives of our countrymen * Hanover, Jan. 11, 1759. assau Hall, Aug. 152, 1759.
 
356 A THAKSGIVIG SERMO and fellow-subjects. Before the hour of victory, destined by Heaven, all our attempts were in vain, and issued in inglorious defeats ; but when that hour is come, the terror of the Lord falls upon our enemies, and the important acquisitions are made as without hands. The sword of the Lord and of General Amherst gleaming from afar, strike our enemies into a panic ; they lose all power of resistance, and the terror of the British name puts them to flight. After frequent days of fasting and humiliation under the frowns of Heaven upon our country and nation, and still more frequent occasions for them ; after the Lord of hosts has called us to weeping and mourning, and all the sad solemnities of repentance and sorrow, for a course of years; behold! through the unmerited, and almost unex- pected, mercy of God, we, at length, see one more day of joy and thanksgiving. To this agreeable duty, Heaven calls us by the late success of our expeditions ; and our government has gratefully obeyed the call ; and divine and human authority conspire to render the business of this day our duty. And oh ! that we may engage in it with hearts overflowing with gratitude, and all the sacred pas- sions which the occasion requires ! I need not tell you that you have occasion for joy and thanksgiving, when you know, Cape Breton is ours, and Fort Duquesne is abandoned and demolished. Cape Bre- ton, the key of the French settlements in America, the object of our anxious fears, and of fruitless expeditions of immense expense Cape Breton, whose inexhaustible fish- ery enriched the treasury of France, and educated so many men for her marine service Cape Breton, the asylum of the privateers that ruined our trade, and that shut up our entrance by sea into the heart of Canada Cape Breton, the possession of which puts it in our power
 
FOR ATIOAL BLESSIGS. 357 to weaken the enemy both in Europe and America, by cutting off their mutual intercourse by navigation : Cape Breton is ours ! ours with the additional acquisition of the fertile island of St. John ours, after a short siege, and a very inconsiderable loss* ours, after a long season of anxious suspense and discouragements ; after repeated dis- appointments and mortifications. Fort Duquesne, the den of those mongrel savages of French and Indians, who have ravaged our frontiers, cap- tivated and butchered so many of our fellow subjects, and ruined so many poor femilies Fort Duquesne, the object of Braddock's ever-tragical and unfortunate expedition, t near which so many brave lives have been repeatedly thrown away in vain Fort Duquesne, the magazine which furnished our Indian enemies with previsions, arms, and fury, to make their barbarous inroads upon the British set- tlements, and prevented our growing country from extend- ing its frontiers on the Ohio Fort Duquesne, is aban- doned and demolished; demolished by those hands that built it, without the loss of a man on our side. The ter- ror of the Lord fell upon them, and they fled at the ap- proach of our army, so superior to them in number, and so resolute to pursue the expedition, notwithstanding the severities of approaching winter. What though those, if such there be, who thirsted for their blood, are not grati- fied? What though our commanders may not have ac- quired the same military glory, as if they had taken it after all the dreadful formalities of a siege? W T hat though we are not possessed of a fort, arms, and ammunition ready to our hands ? These disadvantages are more than balanced by this consideration, so agreeable to every man of hu- manity and benevolence ; that the lives and limbs of men have been spared, many of which, no doubt, must have * ot quite three hundred men. f Vide the C9th discourse.

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