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The Waters of Marah.

The Waters of Marah.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY JOHN SCOTT, D. D.



And when they came to Marah ^ they could not drink of the waters of
Marah ^ for they were bitter: therefore the name of it was called Marah, And the people murmured against Moses ^ sayings What shall we drink? And he cried unto the Lord, and the Lord showed him a tree, which when he had cast into the waters, the waters were made sweet. ''' Exodus xv: 23-2S.
BY JOHN SCOTT, D. D.



And when they came to Marah ^ they could not drink of the waters of
Marah ^ for they were bitter: therefore the name of it was called Marah, And the people murmured against Moses ^ sayings What shall we drink? And he cried unto the Lord, and the Lord showed him a tree, which when he had cast into the waters, the waters were made sweet. ''' Exodus xv: 23-2S.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Apr 08, 2014
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THE WATERS OF MARAH. BY JOH SCOTT, D. D. And when they came to Marah ^ they could not drink of the waters of Marah ^ for they were bitter: therefore the name of it was called Marah, And the people murmured against Moses ^ sayings What shall we drink? And he cried unto the Lord, and the Lord showed him a tree, which when he had cast into the waters, the waters were made sweet. ''' Exodus xv: 23-2S. THE bondage of the children of Israel in Egypt, their deliverance from the yoke of the oppressor, their sojourn in the wilderness, with its conflicts, trials, and victories, and their final settlement in the land of promise, are frequently employed, and very appropriately, too, to represent our bondage to sin, our deliverance by grace, our trials and conflicts through life, and our final en- trance into eternal rest. There are many incidents in the history of God's ancient peo- ple well calculated to afford us important les- sons of instruction. The one recorded in the text is of this character. g6 Pulpit Echoes. The destroying angel had gone through- out the land of Egypt, and smitten the first- born of the Egyptians, both of man and of beast. In every house there was one dead. Filled with fear and consternation, Pharaoh had given commandment for the Israelites to depart. Accordingly they journeyed from Rameses, by the way of the wilderness, to
 
the border of the Red Sea, and encamped at a place called Pi-hahiroth, the exact lo- cality of which is now unknown. But Pha- raoh, having recovered from his alarm, and having repented his act in letting the peo- ple go, pursued after them with a mighty host of chariots, and horsemen, and people, and overtook them in their encampment by the sea. The condition of the Israelites was apparently one of great peril ; but God gra- ciously interposed in their behalf, and miracu- lously opened up for them a passage through the Red Sea, while Pharaoh and his host, essaying to follow them, were overthrown and perished in its waters. After this glorious deliverance, Moses and the children of Israel sang a song of lofty praise to God, in which they celebrated his power in their deliverance, and in the over- The Waters of Mar ah. 97 throw of their enemies. And Miriam, the sister of Moses and Aaron, with a timbrel, responded in a thrilhng chorus, and led the women in dances and in song, saying, '' Sing ye to the Lord, for he hath triumphed glo- riously; the horse and his rider hath he thrown into the sea/' The dancing of Mir- iam was not such as is now indulged in for pleasure, for she was then more than ninety years old ; but such as we sometimes wit- ness when God graciously blesses his people, and they leap for joy. The Red Sea, through which the chil- dren of Israel passed, is about eight hundred
 
miles in length and about two hundred in width at the widest part. Toward the north it divides into two gulfs, which at their ex- tremities are about two hundred miles apart. The western of these is the Gulf of Suez, and the eastern the Gulf of Akabah. The passage of the Israelites was near the north- ern extremity of the Gulf of Suez. The ex- act locality, however, is not known. The tri- angular tongue of land between the two gulfs, which abounds in deserts and mountains, in- cluding Sinai and Horeb, was the scene of 9 98 Pulpit Echoes. the wanderings of the children of Israel for nearly forty years. From the Red Sea they went three days'  journey into the wilderness of Shun and the people found no water. It was a barren, drear}^ desert. And when they came to Marah, where there was water, the water was bitter, and the people could not drink of it. The consequence was, they were greatly discour- aged, and murmured against Moses. It ap- pears to be natural for people, when any great difficulty or disaster occurs in any of their enterprises, to com.plain of their lead- ers. It was so in this case, and it is generally so. But the complaints which the people brought to ]\Ioses he carried to the Lord, and spread them out before him, and cried unto him in his distress. ''And the Lord showed him a tree, which when he had cast into the waters, the waters were made sweet,'' I

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