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Trial and Triumph.

Trial and Triumph.

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Published by glennpease
BY JOHN SCOTT, D. D.


'''And it came to pass^ as they still went on^ and talked^ that, behold,
there appeared a chariot of fire, and horses of fire, and parted theni both
asunder; and Elijah went up by a whirlwind into heaven,'' 2 Kings
ii: 2.
BY JOHN SCOTT, D. D.


'''And it came to pass^ as they still went on^ and talked^ that, behold,
there appeared a chariot of fire, and horses of fire, and parted theni both
asunder; and Elijah went up by a whirlwind into heaven,'' 2 Kings
ii: 2.

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Published by: glennpease on Apr 08, 2014
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TRIAL AD TRIUMPH. BY JOH SCOTT, D. D. '''And it came to pass^ as they still went on^ and talked^ that, behold, there appeared a chariot of fire, and horses of fire, and parted theni both asunder; and Elijah went up by a whirlwind into heaven,'' 2 Kings ii: 2. ^ ¥ "^HE descent of the Prophet Elijah is I involved in obscurity. We know noth- ing of his parentage, and but little of his early history. He is said to have been of the inhabitants of Gilead, and was called the Tishbite. From this we may infer that he was of the tribe of Gad, or of the half tribe of Manasseh, which dwelt beyond Jor- dan, and between which the country of Gilead was divided, and that he dwelt in Tishbe, a town in that country. From the obscurity of his origin and the meaning of his name — "He is my God'' — some have supposed that he was an angel, who for a time appeared in Trial and Triumph, 283 human form, to recall the world from its cor- ruption and error. The manner of his de- parture from the world is also supposed to afford some evidence in support of this con-  jecture. We can not, however, conceive how this supposition can be reconciled with the plain declaration of the apostle, that he was *'a man subject to like passions as we are," or as Dr. Adam Clarke has it, '' with real human propensities.''
 
He appears to have been peculiarly the prophet of Israel, as we have no account of him ever prophesying in Judah. He is first introduced to our notice as a messenger of God to denounce the judgments of heaven against Ahab, the wicked king of Israel, and against his equally wicked subjects. He was undoubtedly a great prophet, and his equal perhaps never appeared in Israel. For the purpose of magnifying his own power and overthrowing idolatry, God performed many miracles by his hand. He restored the dead to life ; at his word the heavens were shut and opened ; and on one occasion he called down fire from heaven, which consumed his enemies. For wise and benevolent reasons God de- termined that a life of such faithfulness should 284 Pulpit Echoes. be crowned with a triumphant end. This pur- pose appears to have been communicated to EHjah, and also to the schools of the proph- ets. But instead of giving himself up to the contemplation of the joys that awaited him, he was increasingly active and faithful in the performance of duty. Accompanied by his servant Elisha, he went from Gilgal to Bethel, and visited the sons of the prophets, and gave them, no doubt, his last counsel and benediction. From Bethel he went to Jericho, for a similar purpose, and thence to the Jor- dan, and with his mantle he divided its waters, and '' they two went over on dry ground." Having proved the fidelity of his servant Elisha, he said unto him, *VAsk what I shall
 
do for thee, before I shall be taken away from thee. And Elisha said, I pray thee, let a dou- ble portion of thy spirit be upon me/' This the prophet informed him was a difficult re- quest ; yet he assured him, nevertheless, that if he would remain faithful, and continue with him to the end, God would grant it. ''And it came to pass, as they still went on, and talked, that, behold, there appeared a chariot of fire, and horses of fire, and parted them both asunder; and Elijah went up by a whirl- Trial and Trinmph. 285 wind into heaven. And Elisha saw it, and cried, My father, my father, the chariot of Is- rael, and the horsemen thereof. And he saw him no more/' From the history of this eminent man of God we may learn important lessons of in- struction. His whole life was a continual trial. Like all the children of God, he drank of the cup of earthly sorrow, and passed through scenes of tribulation. Although a distin- guished prophet, yet he was not exempted from the ordinary trials and afflictions of life. Even Christ, the Great Prophet, was made perfect through suffering ; and if we would gain his presence, we must follow his steps. He that would reach the mountain's top must climb the mountain's brow. Elijah had many external trials to en- counter. The times in which he lived were marked by gross idolatry and wickedness. The altars of God were broken down; his worship was forsaken ; and his prophets had

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