Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Spiritual Ploughing.

Spiritual Ploughing.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1|Likes:
Published by glennpease
BY WILLIAM BURNET WRIGHT


And another also said, Lord, I will follow thee ; but
let me first go bid them farewell, which are at home at
my house. And Jesus said unto him, No man, having
put his hand to the plough., and looking back, is fit [ lit.
" well placed," t. e. in the right attitude ] for the king-
dom of God. — Luke ix. 61, 62.
BY WILLIAM BURNET WRIGHT


And another also said, Lord, I will follow thee ; but
let me first go bid them farewell, which are at home at
my house. And Jesus said unto him, No man, having
put his hand to the plough., and looking back, is fit [ lit.
" well placed," t. e. in the right attitude ] for the king-
dom of God. — Luke ix. 61, 62.

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Apr 10, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/10/2014

pdf

text

original

 
SPIRITUAL PLOUGHIG. BY WILLIAM BURET WRIGHT And another also said, Lord, I will follow thee ; but let me first go bid them farewell, which are at home at my house. And Jesus said unto him, o man, having put his hand to the plough., and looking back, is fit [ lit. " well placed," t. e. in the right attitude ] for the king- dom of God. — Luke ix. 61, 62. Let us beware of drawing from these words the foolish inference that it is better not to plough than to plough poorly ; better to stay behind than to glance behind. It is folly not to do the best we can because we cannot do better than we can. Some are waiting until they are perfect Christians be- fore they will begin to be Christians at all. Pride, aping humility, makes them ashamed to creep, and therefore they never learn to walk. But our Lord was not speaking to one in danger of making that mistake. He was showing a disciple how to do in the right way what the disciple was undertaking to do in a wrong way. 60 THE WORLD TO COME. The man had decided to go with Jesus. He asked leave only to return home and bid farewell to his family. He might never see them again. His request seems innocent and amiable. Yet Jesus replied to him : " You are beginning in a wrong way. You
 
are like a farmer trying to plough with his eyes behind him." Like certain other utterances of our Lord, that of the beam and the mote, of the old and new bottles, for example, this one glows with a sweet and subtle humor. Those who have watched a ploughman at his work will appreciate the figure, for it would be easy to show that, though the appearance of an Oriental ploughing with young steers was radically different from that of an American ploughing with horses, the sight of either would produce with almost equal vividness the impression upon which the significance of the text depends. Perhaps no other kind of labor demands a more intense concentration of muscle, mind, and will, towards a single purpose, than does ploughing. The ploughman must note every motion of his two draft-horses. If either lags, the other will jerk the share out of line. What each brute intends must SPIRITUAL PLOUGHIG. 61 be foreseen, and loitering steps prevented by voice or whip. The ploughman must ob- serve each root and stone before him, and be ready by swift and dexterous twist to cut through the one or ease over the other. His eye must be upon the drawing beam, for, if it too abruptly leaves the level, the handles, wrenched from his grasp, may hurl him aside or strike him to the ground. He must watch the opening furrow, and find footing by instant shifts from glebe to glebe
 
as the softened earth yields and crumbles beneath his weight, or he will be thrown. Alert to each of these requirements, he must, like the steersman of a vessel, steadily sight his bearings by some stationary object far in front, or his furrow will curve. All this he must do on the jump to economize mo- mentum, or his horses may be stalled. It is an exhilarating sight to watch the skil- ful ploughman, rushing his furrow forward, springing from clod to clod, holding the handles firm with masterful grip, wrench- ing them this way and that with superlative force, shouting to his horses, while the sweat beads his face and his whole body seems one flashing eye, the muscles strained like watch- springs in obedience to his stimulated vision. 62 THE WORLD TO COME. So the yachtsman steers the craft that moves with bellying sail amid the ships and buoys and reefs and shallows of the crowded harbor. ""Skipper, you almost grazed that reef ! Look back ! the wake line touches the surf ! " But the skipper does not look back. His business is, forgetting those things that are behind, to reach forth unto those things that are before. One glance backward may bring wreck or collision. Add to the skipper's gaze, the straining muscles, the beaded brow, the energetic mo- tion, and you have the ploughman ploughing as he should.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->