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Halloween History

Halloween History

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Published by mevaibz9360
This is the transcript of a video from national geographic about the history of halloween.
This is the transcript of a video from national geographic about the history of halloween.

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Published by: mevaibz9360 on Oct 29, 2009
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10/28/2009

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HALLOWEEN HISTORY(National Geographic Video)
From communion with the dead to pumpkins and pranks, Halloween is apatchwork holiday, stitched together with cultural, religious and occult traditionsthat span centuries.It all began with the Celts, a people whose culture had spread across Europe,more than 2,000 years ago. October 31 was the day they celebrated the end of the harvest season, in a festival called “Samhain”. That night also marked theCeltic new year , it was considered a time “between years”, a magical timewhen the ghosts of the dead watched the Earth.
“It was the time when the veil between death and life was supposed to be at itsthinnest” 
On “Samhain”, the villagers gathered and lit huge bonfires to drive the deadback to the spirit world and keep them away from the living. But, as the CatholicChurch’s influence grew in Europe, it frowned on the pagan rituals like“Samhain”. In the 7th Century, the Vatican began to merge it with the ChurchSanctum holiday, so November 1 was designated “All Saints’ Day”, to honor martyrs and the deceased faithful.
“Both of these holidays had to do with the afterworld , and about survival after death. It was a calculated move on the part of the Church, to bring 
 
more
 
 peopleinto
 
the
 
fold 
 
.
All Saints’ Day was known then as “Hallowmas”. “Hallow” means “holy” or “saintly”, so the translation is -roughly- “Mass of the Saints”. The night beforeOctober 31 was “All Hallows’ Eve”, which gradually morphed into “Halloween”.The holiday came to America with the wave of Irish immigrants during thepotato famine of the 1840s. They brought several of their holiday customs withthem, including “bubbing
 
for 
 
apples
, and playing tricks on neighbors, likeremoving gates from the front of houses. The young pranksters were masked,

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