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Man's Future Destiny.

Man's Future Destiny.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY W. H. H. MURRAY.



" Then said one unto him, Lord, are there few that be
saved ? And he said unto them,

" Strive to enter in at the strait gate : for many, I
say unto you, will seek to enter in, and shall not be
able." Luke xiii.: 23, 24.
BY W. H. H. MURRAY.



" Then said one unto him, Lord, are there few that be
saved ? And he said unto them,

" Strive to enter in at the strait gate : for many, I
say unto you, will seek to enter in, and shall not be
able." Luke xiii.: 23, 24.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Apr 13, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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MA'S FUTURE DESTIY. BY W. H. H. MURRAY. " Then said one unto him, Lord, are there few that be saved ? And he said unto them, " Strive to enter in at the strait gate : for many, I say unto you, will seek to enter in, and shall not be able." Luke xiii.: 23, 24. I AM frank enough to say, at the start, that I do not propose to-day to join in the discussion, now so popular, of what is known as the doc trine of reprobation; for, touching the discussion in reference to the state of the wicked after they have passed from their present bodies, I confess that I am little interested in it. The apparent profit to be derived from the clamorous treatment is not of so weighty a character as to constitute in me a sense of obligation as a public teacher, or any especial interest as a personal human being. Whether the wicked, as they continue to live, shall live as they do now, in conjunction with the good ; or whether they shall be confined to their own companionship, and whether, if so, the locality of that companionship will be fixed, I know not. Much less do I know in reference i 9 4 RELIGIOUS DISCOURSES. to what seems to me a far weightier problem, whether the punishment for sin shall be inflicted by Supreme Power, or be self-inflicted. Whether the relation of weaker spirits to a stronger spirit is the same as weaker bodies hold to a stronger body, is also a question I do not attempt to decide. I may be lacking in my moral structure, but I am so made that such questions do not interest me. Indeed, the entire future interests me less than the present, for I know that the present de
 
cides the future. I look not anxiously beyond the light of the present day. I take no thought for the morrow. Whether that morrow is to be a fraction of eternity, I know not, and I say it with reverence I care not. To me a fraction of eternity is no more solemn than a fraction of time. Life here is no less consequential than life there. The laws by which I should govern the outgoings of my powers are the same to-day as they will be to-morrow and forever. Eternity is, therefore, neither a fear nor a hope, in the sense of a stroke that shall swiftly descend, smiting my being suddenly downward into abysms of distress, or of hope, as something which will suddenly jump me up to the apex MA'S FUTURE DESTIY. 195 of vital possibilities. Going out of this present body into another will not affect me in the quality or quantity of my power. If I am wicked when I go out, I shall be wicked when I enter in ; and the measure of goodness which is mine as I depart from the one form, will accom pany me when I come into possession of the other form. I shall be no more of a man in going out of the coffin than I am when I shall go in; nor shall I be any less. For I shall take all my powers with me in my decline, as the sun takes all his beams with him in his setting. And I shall stand in the unseen world with those very same powers, as the sun beams forth the same light and heat when he makes the morning of a new hemisphere the evening and morning of the same day. Touching the locality of my life in the ages ahead, I am also reverently indifferent. The happiness of my life here has not depended on its surroundings. I have slept as peacefully in chambers with the roughly-hewn rafters and roof-boards in sight as I have in chambers whose ceiling was loftier, and over whose surface Art had spread her finest decorations. I have eaten at the table of the rich, and been happy. I have
 
196 RELIGIOUS DISCOURSES. shared the poor man's fare with equal happiness. I have seen the small things of life, and I have seen the larger, and' I find that my happiness is not measured by the character of my surround ings, but by the state and condition of my own nature. or have I any doubt that in the hu man structure is such sublime force that man might find joy even in pain, and yield his body to the flames as men seek pleasant couches. The songs that the martyrs have sung as their flesh simmered were not hypocritical. They were not frauds, as they burned. They show us, rather, how little is the body and how great is the being that inhabits it. So that while the tenement was consumed, even to ashes, the tenant went out of it with a bright and happy face, rejoicing at his escape. I have no need, so far as I sense the needs of my future being, for any more glorious country than the one in which I have lived. The skies above my head, and the earth beneath my feet, and the ornamentation of either, supply my sense of beauty abundantly. The present light by which I see, and the orbs with which I behold, satisfy my need of vision. My senses and my faculties are sufficient to make a heaven beyond the measure of whose MA'S FUTURE DESTIY. 197  joy I ask no supernal addition. or do I de mand selected companionship, beyond what is possible for each individual to make in the pres ent life. I do not -need the absence of pain ful sights as a condition of heaven ; I even find that in relieving the pain I see I find the door of heaven. To feed the motherless bird left starving by cruel chance or more cruel man in the clamorous nest; to make, out of my open window and my welcoming room, a refuge for

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