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Arbor Topics Fall Winter 2009

Arbor Topics Fall Winter 2009

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Published by Chris Heiler
Newsletter from The Davey Tree Expert Company
Newsletter from The Davey Tree Expert Company

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Published by: Chris Heiler on Oct 31, 2009
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10/30/2009

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any people believe that only mature trees need to be pruned. However, justlike a young child, young trees need to be trained on how to “behave” or growproperly. I we do not train them, they oten develop poor structures that canlead to limb breakage or even tree ailure. A structural problem that can be easily xed on ayoung tree may require radical, expensive, or damaging repairs later.One pruning technique, called “subordinationpruning,” involves selectively shortening orsubordinating leaders and branches to encouragethe growth o others. By doing this, we attempt toduplicate the way trees grow in the orest.Forest trees grow close together. Youngtrees compete with each other or space andsunlight. The trees grow narrow and tall tryingto rise above their neighbors to get the mostsunlight. Growth tends to be ocused in thecentral leaders and suppressed in side branches. This allows trees to ocus growth upward, ratherthan outward.In a landscape situation, we plant trees artherapart. In the absence o competition rom nearbytrees, urban trees have a tendency to growwider than they do in the orest. Oten, severalbranches rom the same tree will compete witheach other or vertical space. These competingbranches oten lead to trees with multipleleaders and poor structure.By selecting the best leader and shortening competing leaders, an arborist can “train” the treeto grow in a manner that promotes a strong ramework less likely to be damaged by storms orneeding drastic structural correction later in lie. A ew minutes time selectively shortening andremoving branches on young trees can prevent thousands o dollars worth o uture damage.
arbor 
Our business is
people
and their
love
for
trees
 www.thecareoftrees.com
Fall/Winter 2009 
topics
Pruning Trees to Give Direction
Fall To-Do List ............................................2Ask the Tree Doctor ......................................3A Helpul Reminder ....................................Flap The Care o Trees Shares “Building With Trees” Honors .....6
 
Wondering what you need to do or your trees this all? 
 
Here’s a to-do list that can help. Your certied arborist with The Care o Treescan assist you in keeping your landscape looking beautiul and healthy.
M
embers o  The Careo Treesamily recently took part in 2009 Stihl Tour des Trees, anannual bike ride thatraises money or treeresearch and helpsto educate the publicon the importance o proper tree care in maintaining thehealth o our community orests and urban trees.More than 70 cyclists took part in this year’s 500-mile trek which started in New York City’s Central Park and traveledacross the Northeast, making stops and planting treesalong the route. Since its inception in 1992, the Tour hasgenerated more than $4.4 million and has unded a hosto diverse projects such as post-Katrina research on theimpact o hurricane ooding on mature trees. For moreinormation, visit
www.tourdestrees.org
.
Riding for Tree Research
Fall To-Do List
•Wateryourtreesandshrubsifdry•Applygypsumorhumate—twonaturalmaterials—aroundyourtreesandshrubsifwinterde-icingsaltswillbeusednearthem•Checkforgypsymotheggmasses•Inspectyourtreesforsignsofproblemsand
 
structuralconcerns•Startdormantpruning•Applydeerrepellentsandanti-desiccantstoprevent
 
winterburn•Mulchyourtreesandshrubs•ImproveyoursoilwithSoilCare
SM
treatments•Plantsuitabletreesforyourlandscape
    O    C    T    N    O    V     D    E    C
(let) Don Roppolo, Regional Resource Coordinator, Wheeling, IL.; (right) Peter Orszulak,ISA Certifed Arborist, Greenwich, CT 
 
Rex A. Bastian, Ph.D., is a doctor o Entomology and our Vice President o Field Educationand Development. Rex has over 25 years o experience in diagnosing and treating treediseases and other problems caused by pests, soils and site-related incidents. I youhave a question or Dr. Rex, you can e-mail him at
treedoctor@thecareotrees.com
andwe will eature selected questions in the next issue o 
 Arbor Topics.
 Dear Tree Doctor,Are Japanese beetle traps effective?
I have heard conficting reports.
 Ask the Tree Doctor!
Becausetheseobnoxious,metallicgreenandbrownbeetleswillfeedonover250differentspeciesofplants(roses,lindensandmaplesarefavored),highexpectationsaregiventotrapstohelpsavetheday.JapanesebeetletrapsareveryeffectiveinattractingandtrappingadultJapanesebeetles,buttheyareineffectiveinprotectingyoursusceptibletreesandshrubsfromtheirfeedingdamage. Thisseeminglycontradictoryanswerrequiresanexplanation.Japanesebeetletraps,soldatmostgardencenteroutlets,usuallycontaintwoseparate,chemicallures.Onelureisafeedingattractantthatattractsbothmaleandfemalebeetles.Thesecondlureisasexpheromonethatattractsmalebeetles.Theseluresworkverywellinattractinghundreds,eventhousandsofadultbeetlestowardthetrap. Thereinliestheproblem.Manyadultbeetlesareattractedintotheareaaroundthetrap,buttheydonotnecessarilygetcaughtinsidethetrap.Susceptibleplantspecieslocatednearbycanbemoreheavilydamagedthanifthetrapswerenotusedatall.Thiscanbetrueevenifthetrapisfullofcapturedadults.IfyouwouldliketoexperimentwithJapanesebeetletraps,besuretolocatethemasfarawayaspossiblefromtheplantsyouaretryingtoprotect.Placingatrapinthemiddleofyourrosegarden,forexample,isjustaskingfortrouble.
 We Are Tweeting on Twitter
T
he Care o Trees is now on Twitter, the ree social-networking site where users can sendand receive short messages to and rom riends, amily and businesses.Already have an account? Follow The Care o Trees today to get thelatest news on tree pests and diseases, upcoming “green” events in yourarea, tree care tips, and much more!New to the Tweeting scene? Signing up is easy and it’s ree. Simply visit
twitter.com
to create anaccount, visit us at
twitter.com/thecareotrees
, and join the conversation. We want to hear rom you!

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