Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
5Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Learning in the Digital Age by John Seely Brown - Aspen Institute

Learning in the Digital Age by John Seely Brown - Aspen Institute

Ratings: (0)|Views: 431|Likes:
Published by Brent Dance
Learning is a remarkably social process. In truth, it occurs not as a response to teaching, but rather as a result of a social framework that fosters learning. To succeed in our struggle to build technology and new media to support learn- ing, we must move far beyond the traditional view of teaching as delivery of information. Although information is a critical part of learning, it’s only one among many forces at work. It’s profoundly misleading and ineffective to separate information, theories, and principles from the activities and situations within which they are used. Knowledge is inextricably situated in the physical and social context of its acquisition and use.
Learning is a remarkably social process. In truth, it occurs not as a response to teaching, but rather as a result of a social framework that fosters learning. To succeed in our struggle to build technology and new media to support learn- ing, we must move far beyond the traditional view of teaching as delivery of information. Although information is a critical part of learning, it’s only one among many forces at work. It’s profoundly misleading and ineffective to separate information, theories, and principles from the activities and situations within which they are used. Knowledge is inextricably situated in the physical and social context of its acquisition and use.

More info:

Published by: Brent Dance on Oct 31, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/03/2011

pdf

 
Learning in the Digital Age
 John Seely Brown
L
earning is a remarkably social process.
In truth, itoccurs
 not
as a response to teaching, but rather as a resultof a social framework that fosters learning. To succeed in ourstruggle to build technology and new media to support learn-ing, we must move far beyond the traditional view of teachingas delivery of information. Although information is a criticalpart of learning, it’s only one among many forces at work. It’sprofoundly misleading and ineffective to separate information,theories, and principles from the activities and situationswithin which they are used. Knowledge is inextricably 
 situated
in the physical and social context of its acquisition and use.
Information and Knowledge
Key differences between the terms
information
and
knowledge
,which are often used interchangeably, are instructive. First,whereas information is usually considered independent of any particular individual—it can be looked up in a book or re-trieved online—knowledge is usually associated with a knower,
65
 
that is, it resides in someone’s mind. Second, given this per-sonal attachment, knowledge appears more difficult to detachthan information. It’s harder, for example, to pick up, writedown, and transfer than information. Third, one reason knowl-edge may be so hard to give and receive is that it seems to beacquired more through assimilation. Knowledge is somethingwe digest rather than merely hold; it’s usually deeply inter-twined with the knower’s understanding of the practices sur-rounding its use. When we look at teaching beyond the mere delivery of infor-mation, we see a rich picture of learning, one that embracesthe social context, resources, background, and history withinwhich information resides. Knowledge, following MichaelPolanyi, can be thought of as having two dimensions: explicitand tacit.
1
If we think of knowledge as a tree, the explicit di-mension is like the leaves, branches, and trunk—the partsabove ground. The tacit dimension is like the roots buried be-low the surface and deeply immersed in the soil that makes itrobust. The explicit lives in books and in our brains as con-cepts and facts and deals with the “know-
 what
.” The tacit dealswith the “know-
how
” that is best manifested in work practicesand skills. The tacit resides in action, most often in participa-tion with others. As a consequence, tacit knowledge can bedistributed as a shared, socially constructed understandingthat emerges from collaboration.Learning by doing with others offers students the opportu-nity for in-depth enculturation into a particular practice, where
66the internet and the university 
 
one
learns to be
a physicist, social scientist, historian, etc., incontrast to just
learning about
such professions. Students couldabsorb the social and practical aspects of a profession (its prac-tices) and gain tremendously from their proximity to practition-ers, especially when they can watch, listen, and peripherally participate. Enculturation is crucial to such learning, since rel-atively little of the complex web of practice can effectively bemade the subject of explicit instruction. A great deal of knowl-edge inevitably remains implicit in practice. The conventionalroute of trying to render the implicit explicit, which is the stan-dard alternative to enculturation, is highly problematic.
2
Legitimate Peripheral Participation
 Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger sum up their view of learningas socially situated in their notion of 
legitimate peripheral par-ticipation (LPP)
. As they put it,
“Legitimate peripheral participation is ... an analytic view-point on learning, a way of understanding learning. We hopeto make it clear that learning through legitimate peripheralparticipation takes place no matter which educational formprovides a context for learning, or whether there is any in-tentional educational form at all. Indeed, this viewpointmakes a fundamental distinction between learning and in-tentional instruction.”
3
67learning in the digital age

Activity (5)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
dissettj liked this
arjunp72bs liked this
John Seely Brown liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->