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Energy Revolution Summary

Energy Revolution Summary

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Published by slack
Executive Summary and Introduction to Greenpeace's "energy [r]evolution" report.
Executive Summary and Introduction to Greenpeace's "energy [r]evolution" report.

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Published by: slack on Aug 01, 2007
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09/21/2011

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  -  -   ©    P   A   U   L   L   A   N   G   R   O   C   K   /   Z   E   N   I   T   /   G   R   E   E   N   P   E   A   C   E
report
global energy scenario
energy
[r]evolution
A SUSTAINABLE WORLD ENERGY OUTLOOK
   ©    D   R   E   A   M   S   T   I   M   E
EUROPEAN RENEWABLEENERGY COUNCIL
   ©   G   P   /   V   I   S   S   E   R   /   G   R   E   E   N   P   E   A   C   E
 
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There is now growingawareness on theimperatives for a globalenergy future which marksa distinct departure from past trends and patternsof energy production and use. These imperativesemerge as much from theneed to ensure energy security, as they do fromthe urgency of controlling local pollution fromcombustion of differentfuels and, of course, thegrowing challenge of climate change, whichrequires reduction inemissions of greenhousegases (GHSs), particularly carbon dioxide.
This publication provides stimulating analysis on future scenarios ofenergy use,which focus on a range of technologies that are expected toemerge in the coming years and decades.There is now universalrecognition of the fact that new technologies and much greater use ofsome that already exist provide the most hopeful prospects formitigation of emissions of GHGs.It is for this reason that theInternational Energy Agency,which in the past pursued an approachbased on a single time path of energy demand and supply,has nowdeveloped alternative scenarios that incorporate future technologicalchanges.In the Fourth Assessment Report of the IntergovernmentalPanel on Climate Change (IPCC) as well,technology is included as acrosscutting theme in recognition of the fact that an assessment oftechnological options would be important both for mitigation as well asadaptation measures for tackling climate change.The scientific evidence on the need for urgent action on the problem ofclimate change has now become stronger and convincing.Futuresolutions would lie in the use of existing renewable energy technologies,greater efforts at energy efficiency and the dissemination ofdecentralized energy technologies and options.This particularpublication provides much analysis and well-researched material tostimulate thinking on options that could be adopted in these areas.It isexpected that readers who are knowledgeable inthe field as well asthose who are seeking an understanding of the subjects covered in theensuing pages would greatly benefit from reading this publication.
 Dr. R. K. Pachauri
CHAIRMAN INTERGOVERNMENTAL PANEL ON CLIMATE CHANGEJANUARY 2007
foreword
 
The good news first.Renewable energy,combined with the smart use ofenergy,can deliver half of the world’s energy needs by 2050.This newreport,‘Energy [R]evolution:A sustainable World Energy Outlook’,shows that it is economically feasible to cut global CO
2
emissions byalmost 50% within the next 43 years.It also concludes that a massiveuptake of renewable energy sources is technically possible.All that ismissing is the right policy support.The bad news is that time is running out.An overwhelming consensusof scientific opinion now agrees that climate change is happening,iscaused in large part by human activities (such as burning fossil fuels),and if left un-checked,will have disastrous consequences.Furthermore,there is solid scientific evidence that we should act now.This isreflected in the conclusions of the Intergovernmental Panel on ClimateChange (IPCC),a UN institution of more than 1,000 scientistsproviding advice to policy makers.Its next report,due for release in2007,is unlikely to make any better reading.In response to this threat,the Kyoto Protocol has committed itssignatories to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by 5.2% from their1990 level by the target period of 2008-2012.This in turn has resultedin the adoption of a series of regional and national reduction targets.Inthe European Union,for instance,the commitment is to an overallreduction of 8%.In order to reach this target,the EU has also agreed toincrease its proportion of renewable energy from 6% to 12% by 2010.The Kyoto signatories are currently negotiating the second phase of theagreement,covering the period from 2013-2017.Within this timeframeindustrialised countries need to reduce their CO
2
emissions by 18%from 1990 levels,and then by 30% between 2018 and 2022.Only withthese cuts do we stand a reasonable chance of keeping the averageincrease in global temperatures to less than 2°C,beyond which theeffects of climate change will become catastrophic.Alongside global warming,other challenges have become just aspressing.Worldwide energy demand is growing at a staggering rate.Over-reliance on energy imports from a few,often politically unstablecountries and volatile oil and gas prices have together pushed securityof energy supply to the top of the political agenda,as well asthreatening to inflict a massive drain on the global economy.But whilstthere is a broad consensus that we need to change the way we produceand consume energy,there is still disagreement about how to do this.
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GLOBAL ENERGY [R]EVOLUTIONA SUSTAINABLE WORLD ENERGY OUTLOOK
introduction
“TO ACHIEVE AN ECONOMICALLY ATTRACTIVE GROWTH OF RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES,A BALANCED AND TIMELY MOBILISATION OF ALL RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES IS OF GREAT IMPORTANCE.”
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image
TEST WINDMILL N90 2500,BUILT BY THE GERMAN COMPANY NORDEX,IN THE HARBOUR OF ROSTOCK.THIS WINDMILL PRODUCES 2,5 MEGA WATT AND IS TESTED UNDER OFFSHORECONDITIONS.AT LEAST 10 FACILITIES OF THIS TYPE WILL BE ERECTED 20 KM OFF THE ISLAND DARSS IN THE BALTIC SEA BY 2007.TWO TECHNICIANS WORKING INSIDE THE TURBINE.

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