Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
04-22-14 edition

04-22-14 edition

Ratings: (0)|Views: 135 |Likes:
04-22-14 edition
04-22-14 edition

More info:

Published by: San Mateo Daily Journal on Apr 22, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/22/2014

pdf

text

original

 
www.smdailyjournal.com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Tuesday
April 22,2014
Vol XIII,Edition 212
650.588.0388
601 El Camino RealSan Bruno, CA 94066Mon.-Sat. 10am-7pmSun. Noon to 6pm
‘DAYS,NOT WEEKS’
WORLD PAGE 7
 
WARRIORSBLOWNOUT
SPORTS PAGE 11
KIDSGETCODEINEDESPITETHE RISK
HEALTH PAGE 19
RUSSIA TOLD TO ABIDE BY AN INTERNATIONAL ACCORDAIMED AT STEMMING THE UKRAINE
PG&E pleadsnot guilty topipeline blast
By Garance Gurke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Pacific Gas &Electric Co. pleaded not guilty Monday to adozen felony chargesstemming from allegedsafety violations in adeadly 2010 natural gaspipeline explosion thatleveled a neighborhoodin San Bruno. As survivors of theblast looked on, attor-neys for California’slargest utility entered theplea in federal court in San Francisco to 12felony violations of federal pipeline safetylaws.U.S. Magistrate Judge Joseph Spero notedprosecutors’request to increase the maxi-mum fine PG&E could face to more than $6million, if the court decides the companysomehow benefited financially or savedmoney as a result of criminal misconduct.San Bruno city officials hailed the devel-opment as a positive step and said theybelieved company officials should becharged as well.
County extends carehome contracts andadds the mentally ill
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The private operator that saved a county-run Burlingame care home from shutteringtwo years ago is stepping in to keep up tofour dozen mentally ill clients housed attheir current long-term facility after pur-chasing it out of bankruptcy.The new deal between San Mateo County’sHealth System and operator Brius LLC givesthe county exclusive use of all 48 beds atMillbrae Manor, where 40 patients are cur-rently housed on a county contract, without
SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL
Cynthia Newton outside her North Shoreview home for which she is federally mandated to carry costly flood insurance.
Bel
 
ow
:Newton isin the process of remodeling her kitchen.
 
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Abig backyard, fruit trees, hardwood floors,brick walkway, a friendly neighborhood andvisions of raising a family first attractedCynthia Newton to buy her home in the NorthShoreview neighborhood of San Mateo in1996.She painted it yellow, is remodeling herkitchen and continues to turn her home intoone she adores.But in 2001, her idyllic home on the 200block of Huron Avenue became subject tosomething she never would have imagined —federally mandated flood insurance.When the Federal Emergency ManagementAgency issued its new Flood Insurance RateMap, she and thousands of homeowners inthe northwest corner of San Mateo and next to
Flood insurancewoes
San Mateo residents in FEMA flood zone still contending with escalating rates
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Some foster youth scramble to find hous-ing as they turn 18 and age out of fostercare.South San Francisco recently made aneffort to help alleviate that issue by provid-ing vacant city-owned residential unitslocated on the 300 block of Miller Avenueto these youth through the county’sEmancipated Foster Youth Program forthose age 18 to 23. There are currently 73youth in the program and about seven willbe placed in the housing.Helping youth left without housing and
City offers housing to emancipated foster youth
Vacant South San Francisco residential units to be available at lower prices
Connie Jackson
See
PG&E
,Page
18
See
CONTRACTS
,Page
18
See
HOUSING
Page
18
See
FLOOD
,Page
20
 
Student grifter back behind bars in Philadelphia
PHILADELPHIA— Aformer collegestudent convicted of stealing the identi-ties of neighbors and friends hasreturned to federal custody inPhiladelphia to face a probation viola-tion charge that could send her back toprison.The Philadelphia Inquirer said a mag-istrate ordered Monday that 28-year-oldJocelyn Kirsch remain jailed until a fed-eral court decides whether a recentshoplifting conviction violates theterms of her post-sentence court super-vision.Ahearing is set for April 29.Kirsch was sentenced to one year in jail after being convicted in January of two felony burglary counts inCalifornia.That conviction comes six years afterKirsch, then a Drexel University stu-dent, was sentenced to five years in fed-eral prison for a $100,000 identity theftspree with then-boyfriend andUniversity of Pennsylvania graduateEdward Anderton.
Stowaway teen stirs concern about airport security
SAN JOSE A16-year-old boyscrambled over an airport fence, crosseda tarmac and climbed into a jetliner’swheel well, then flew for five freezinghours to Hawaii — a misadventure thatstirred concern about possible weakspots in the security system that pro-tects the nation’s airline fleet.The boy, who lives in Santa Clara andattends a local high school, hopped outof the wheel well of a Boeing 767 on theMaui airport tarmac Sunday. Authoritiesfound him wandering around the airportgrounds with no identification. He wasquestioned by the FBI and taken byambulance to a hospital, where he wasfound to be unharmed.FBI spokesman Tom Simon inHonolulu said the teen did not rememberthe flight from San Jose.It was not immediately clear how theboy stayed alive in the unpressurizedspace, where temperatures at cruisingaltitude can fall well below zero and theair is too thin for humans to stay con-scious. An FAAstudy of stowawaysfound that some went into a hiberna-tion-like state.On Monday, authorities tried to deter-mine how the boy slipped through mul-tiple layers of security, including wide-ranging video surveillance, Germanshepherds and Segway-riding policeofficers.Security footage from the San Joseairport verified that the boy climbed afence and crossed a runway to get toHawaiian Airlines Flight 45 on Sundaymorning, Simon said.That airport, in the heart of SiliconValley, is surrounded by fences,although many sections do not havebarbed wire and could easily be scaled.The boy climbed over during thenight, “under the cover of darkness,”San Jose airport spokeswomanRosemary Barnes said Monday.Hours later, surveillance video atKahului Airport showed the boy gettingout of the wheel well after landing,according to a statement from Hawaii’sDepartment of Transportation. Thevideo was not released due to the ongo-ing investigation.
At least 12 arrested at San Francisco 4/20 party
SAN FRANCISCO — At least a dozenpeople were arrested, most of them fac-ing possible felony charges, during anannual, unsanctioned 4/20 marijuanacelebration in San Francisco, policesaid Monday.About nine people potentially facefelonies, including two accused of pos-sessing and carrying a loaded and con-cealed handgun during Sunday’s gather-ing at Hippie Hill in Golden Gate Park,said Sgt. Danielle Newman, a policespokeswoman. There were also multiple arrests forpossessing and selling marijuana oropiates, and numerous other citations,Newman said. Officers also responded tofour medical calls, including a seizureand an overdose, she added. No deathswere reported.City officials estimated that about15,000 people attended the of thenation’s largest gatherings for the unof-ficial April 20 pot holiday, held coinci-dentally this year on Easter Sunday.
FOR THE RECORD2
Tuesday
April 22,2014
 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA94402
Publisher: Jerry LeeEditorin Chief: Jon Mays
 jerry@smdailyjournal.comjon@smdailyjournal.comsmdailyjournal.comscribd.com/smdailyjournaltwitter.com/smdailyjournalfacebook.com/smdailyjournalPhone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290To Advertise:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.comEvents:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.comNews:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.comDelivery:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . distribution@smdailyjournal.comCareer: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service,the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries,emailinformation along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style,clarity,length and grammar.If you would like to have an obituary printedmore than once,longer than 250 words or without editing,please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Actor Ryan Stiles is55.
This Day in HistoryThought for the Day
1864
Congress authorized the use of thephrase “In God We Trust” on U.S.coins.
“Life is one long  process of getting tired.” 
— Samuel Butler,British author (1835-1902)
Actor Jack Nicholson is 77.Actress MichelleRyan is 30.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Meb Keflezighi of the U.S.reacts after winning the men’s division of the 118th running of the Boston Marathon in Boston.
Tuesday
: Mostly cloudy in the morningthen becoming partly cloudy. Aslightchance of showers in the morning. Highsin the upper 50s. Northwest winds 10 to20 mph.
Tuesday night:
Partly cloudy. Lows inthe mid 40s. Northwest winds 10 to 20mph.
Wednesday:
Sunny in the morning then becoming mostlycloudy. Highs in the upper 50s. Northwest winds 5 to 10mph...Becoming west around 15 mph in the afternoon.
Wednesday night:
Mostly cloudy. Lows in the mid 40s.Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Thursday
: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the upper 50s.Thursday night and Friday: Mostly cloudy. Achance of rain.Lows in the mid 40s. Highs in the upper 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
In 1889
, the Oklahoma Land Rush began at noon as thou-sands of homesteaders staked claims.
In 1912
, the United States Chamber of Commerce had itsbeginnings with a National Commercial Conference held inWashington, D.C.
In 1930, 
the United States, Britain and Japan signed theLondon Naval Treaty, which regulated submarine warfare andlimited shipbuilding.
In 1938, 
45 workers were killed in a coal mine explosionat Keen Mountain in Buchanan County, Va.
In 1944
, during World War II, U.S. forces began invadingJapanese-held New Guinea with amphibious landings atHollandia and Aitape.
In 1952, 
an atomic test in Nevada became the first nuclearexplosion shown on live network television as a 31-kilo-ton bomb was dropped from a B-50 Superfortress.
In 1954, 
the publicly televised sessions of the SenateArmy-McCarthy hearings began.
In 1964
, President Lyndon B. Johnson opened the NewYork World’s Fair.
In 1970
, millions of Americans concerned about the envi-ronment observed the first “Earth Day.”
In 1983
, the West German news magazine Stern announcedthe discovery of 60 volumes of personal diaries purportedlywritten by Adolf Hitler; however, the diaries turned out to bea hoax.
In 1993
, the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum was dedi-cated in Washington, D.C., to honor victims of Nazi exter-mination.
In 1994
, Richard M. Nixon, the 37th president of theUnited States, died at a New York hospital four days after suf-fering a stroke; he was 81.
Ten years ago
: Army Ranger Pat Tillman, who’d traded ina multi-million-dollar NFLcontract to serve in Afghanistan,was killed by friendly fire; he was 27.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)GRIME IGLOO HURRAYKARATEYesterday’sJumbles:Answer:The barbershop had been in his family for years andit was his turn to run it...It was his —“HAIR-ITAGE”Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, assuggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,one letter to each square,to form four ordinary words.
KULFEAOIDUBOLEGBDISBEE
 ©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLCAll Rights Reserved.
   C   h  e  c   k  o  u   t   t   h  e  n  e  w ,   f  r  e  e   J   U   S   T   J   U   M   B   L   E  a  p  p
Print youranswer here:
Actor George Cole is 89. Actress Charlotte Rae is 88.Actress Estelle Harris is 86. Singer Glen Campbell is 78.Singer Mel Carter is 71. Author Janet Evanovich is 71.Country singer Cleve Francis is 69. Movie director JohnWaters is 68. Singer Peter Frampton is 64. Rock singer-musi-cian Paul Carrack (Mike and the Mechanics; Squeeze) is 63.Actor Joseph Bottoms is 60. Baseball manager TerryFrancona is 55. Comedian Byron Allen is 53. Actor ChrisMakepeace is 50. Rock musician Fletcher Dragge is 48. ActorJeffrey Dean Morgan is 48. Actress Sheryl Lee is 47. Actress-talk show host Sherri Shepherd is 47.
Lotto
 The Daily Derby race winners areSolid Gold,No.11,in first place;Money Bags,No.11,in secondplace;and Big Ben,No.4,in third place.The racetime was clocked at 1:40.62.
2 7 018 25 38 45 63 9
Meganumber
Ap
 
r
 
il 18 Mega Mill
 
io
 
n
 
s
 
5 6 29 35 51 21
Powerball
A
 
p
 
r
 
il 19 Pow
 
er
 
b
 
all
 
6 9 24 25 34
Fa
 
nta
 
s
 
y Five
 
Da
 
ily th
 
r
 
ee midday
 
76 5 9
Da
 
ily Fou
 
r
 
1 6 1
Da
 
ily th
 
r
 
ee eve
 
n
 
i
 
ng
 
5 30 31 32 46 7
Meganumber
A
 
p
 
ril 19 Su
 
pe
 
r Lot
 
to Plu
 
s
 
3
Tuesday
April 22,2014
 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
       2       0       1       4
 2   0   1  4 
 
TheGoldenYearsarethebestyears! 
Come interact with over 40 exhibitors from all over The Bay Area offering a host of services, giveaways, information and more! 
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
      
         
 
Information Fair – Burlingame
        
      
               
 by San Mateo Pharmacists Assn 
  
 by Peninsula Special Interest Lions Club 
5

 
 Free admission, everyone welcome
 
SAN MATEO
Disturbance
. Aman reported his girlfriendfor spraying him with Mace on the 1800block of El Parque Court before 7:46 a.m.Sunday, April 20.
Suspicious circumstances.
Aman report-ed his neighbors for messing with his laundryon the first block of Hobart Avenue before8:39 a.m. Monday, April 14.
Stolen vehicle.
Awhite motorcycle wasreported stolen on the 900 block of PeninsulaAvenue before 7:58 a.m. Monday, April 14.
Burglary
. Awhite Ford Explorer was report-edly broken into on the first bock of WestFourth Avenue before 7:47 p.m. Wednesday,April 9.
Theft
. Four wheels were reported stolen froma parked vehicle on the 2700 block of SouthEl Camino Real before 10:42 a.m. Tuesday,April 8.
UNINCORPORATED SAN MATEO COUNTY
Fraud
. Aman reported that someone hadcalled him asking him to withdraw $4,000from his bank account on the 500 block of Valencia Avenue in El Granada before 12:47p.m. Tuesday, April 15.
Battery
. Awoman reported her husband hadassaulted her when he was under the influenceon the 100 block of Los Banos in MossBeach before 7:36 p.m. Sunday, April 13.
Police reports
Footloose
Aman was reported for rolling his carwindows up and down and dancing in thestreet at the Sterling Bank and Trust inBurlingame before 9:46 p.m. Sunday,April 20.
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Promoting healthy eating and wellnessis the idea behind a $25,000 grant overtwo to three years recently given to SanBruno’s Rollingwood Elementary Schoolthrough Microsoft and the American HeartAssociation.Microsoft donated the money to theAmerican Heart Association’s TeachingGardens Program, which works to combatchildhood obesity by promoting healthi-er eating and increased physical activityby helping schools set up gardens oncampus. One third of U.S. children areoverweight or obese putting them at high-er risk of heart disease and stroke, accord-ing to the association.“We like starting young,” said CamieSanchez, a community relations directorfor the American Heart Association. “It’sabout getting education and awareness outearly. Not just treating it, but trying toprevent it. … Schools that have a needthat we can step in and fulfill.”Once a school commits to the program,a schoolwide planting day is scheduled.The American Heart Association providesthe materials for planting day, gardenbeds, organic soil, seedlings and plants,cooking demonstrations and other activi-ties. The program offers schools curricu-lum and tools, having students establishtheir own sustainable gardens with sea-sonal vegetables such as snow peas,arugula and cauliflower. This garden in particular will be used toconnect students with topics that couldinclude life cycles; animal and plant inter-actions; companion planting; art;drought resistant planting; building habi-tats; changing environments; taking careof living things; art; and attracting cer-tain pollinators such as butterflies andhummingbirds, according to the grant. “We actually want the schools to cham-pion them,” Sanchez said.Meanwhile, the district is pleased withthe grant.“The grant is important because it repre-sents another successful partnershipbetween our schools and community topromote wellness through sound nutri-tion,” Superintendent David Hutt wrote inan email. “The district has received simi-lar grants, although this is a significantlevel of support to incorporate sustain-ability with developing behaviors of stu-dents.”Having a teaching garden will assist increating different outdoor teaching spacesthat would encourage students to gathertogether to share, learn and discuss differ-ent topics, according to the grant. “Sitting in a garden can be a powerfulexperience,” Rollingwood PrincipalLeigh Schwartz wrote in the grant. “Wewould like to give students the opportuni-ty to be still; observe the natural world;think and reflect in nature; and connecttheir school experience to real worldactivities.”More than just reading about a subjectin a textbook, students will be able toinvestigate, make judgments and explorea topic in greater depth in the garden,Schwartz wrote in an email.“The new standards are asking schoolsto challenge students to support theiropinions with facts and to think criticallyabout what they are learning,” she wrote.“Having a teaching garden gives studentsaccess to a place they can try out theirhypothesis, learn through observationand work with other students collabora-tively on projects related to the garden.”The school began a recycling and com-posting program this year focusing onconserving and reusing resources. Thegarden will also include compostingactivities. “This is a great way to show students thecomplete cycle,” Schwartz wrote.For more information on the programvisit heart.org and click on the “GettingHealthy” tab.
angela@smdailyjournal.com(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
School granted money for garden program
Microsoft providing $25K to San Bruno’s Rollingwood Elementary
Comment on or share this story atwww.smdailyjournal.com

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->