Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Devotional Self Examination.

Devotional Self Examination.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 2|Likes:
Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY ROBERT PHILIP


No man knows himself, who is not in the
habit of examining himself; and no man ex-
amines himself impartially, who does not place
himself under the omniscient eye of God, and
thus invite and submit to divine scrutiny. Our
hearts are too deep to be fathomed by our
conscience, and too deceitful to be unmasked
by our judgment. Indeed, the heart can blind
and pervert both the judgment and the con-
science.
BY ROBERT PHILIP


No man knows himself, who is not in the
habit of examining himself; and no man ex-
amines himself impartially, who does not place
himself under the omniscient eye of God, and
thus invite and submit to divine scrutiny. Our
hearts are too deep to be fathomed by our
conscience, and too deceitful to be unmasked
by our judgment. Indeed, the heart can blind
and pervert both the judgment and the con-
science.

More info:

Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Apr 23, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/23/2014

pdf

text

original

 
DEVOTIOAL SELF-EXAMIATIO. BY ROBERT PHILIPo man knows himself, who is not in the habit of examining himself; and no man ex- amines himself impartially, who does not place himself under the omniscient eye of God, and thus invite and submit to divine scrutiny. Our hearts are too deep to be fathomed by our conscience, and too deceitful to be unmasked by our judgment. Indeed, the heart can blind and pervert both the judgment and the con- science. Hence the necessity of carrying the whole soul to be searched and tried by God, even after all our efforts to examine ourselves : for, until we are alone and upon our knees before the Searcher of hearts, we are both liable and sure to impose on ourselves. We 124 DEVOTIOAL SELF-EXAMIATIO. may, indeed, know, from observation and ex- perience, what is our weak side, or our be- setting sin, and thus have a general idea of our real character; but how weak that side is, or how strong that sin is, we are not fully aware, until we look at them in the light of God. Accordingly, we have found them to be greater, and have been betrayed by them oftener, than we suspected at first. They have carried us further than we calculated upon, and led us into more wrong steps than we anticipated, at first. Yes; and both our weak side and our besetting sin, if left to themselves, are quite capable of hurrying us as much beyond any evil which we now fear, as they were of draw-
 
ing us into those evils which we nov/ deplore. For, what our hearts are thus led to by their own propensities, is only a specimen of the di- rection, rather than of the lengths, they are in- clined to go, when allowed to take their own way. ow, if we must say already, that our hearts have gone too far astray ; and if we be- lieve that they are naturally «* deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked;" — it is high time to take measures for the prevention and DEVOTIOAL SEI.F-EXAMIATIO. 125 cure of their evil tendencies. And, for these purposes, the habit of self-examination in the sight of the omniscient God, is equally neces- sary and useful. David furnishes an example of this devo- tional habit, which will illustrate at once these introductory hints. He was an attentive ob- server and scrutinizer of himself, especially after his restoration to the Divine favour. From that time his '*soul" was, as it were, "conti- nually in his hand;" his "spirit made diligent search;*' he "communed" with his own heart, even "upon his bed," and considered his ways. ow, this was self-examination, in the ordinary sense of the duty ; but he did not stop there. He knew and believed the deceitfulness of his heart too well, to trust its verdict in his own cause; and, therefore, followed up his own scrutiny by praying, " Search, me, O God, and know my heart ; try me and know my thoughts ; and see if there be any wicked way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting." Thus, that there might be no deception, he solemnly put his case into the hands, and under the eye, of
 
m2 126 DEVOTIOAL SELF-EXAMIATIO. God. This was impartial, because devotional, self-examination. Having referred to this example, as an il- lustration of the subject, it may be well to glance at the principles of it. ow, the prayer, *' Search me and try me," recognizes, as an un- questionable truth, the omniscience of Jehovah, and proceeds upon the solemn fact, that '*all things are naked and open to the eyes of Him with whom they have to do." It was, how- ever, by realizing the scrutiny of this omnis- cience in his own case, that David understood how it extended to all creatures, times, and places. '* Thou hast searched and known me,"  — is the point from which he started, in his way to the sublime and awful conclusion, " The darkness and the light are both alike to Thee." And the conclusion is just; for if David's heart in all its recesses, were naked and open unto God, all hearts and all things must be equally visible to Him ; because the power which can search one, can search all; and the reason for searching any heart, holds good in the case of all hearts. God is the Judge of all ; and, as the DEVOTIOAL SELF-EXAMIATIO. 127 secrets of every heart will be brought into judg- ment, none can escape his notice. Each may, therefore, say to himself, *' Lord, thou hast searched and known me;" others may guess

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->