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The Pulpit Commentary on Hosea

The Pulpit Commentary on Hosea

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Published by glennpease
EDITED BY THE

VERY REV. H. D. M. SPENCE, D.D.,

DEAN OF GLOUCESTER;
AND BY THE

REV. JOSEPH S. EXELL, M.A.
EDITED BY THE

VERY REV. H. D. M. SPENCE, D.D.,

DEAN OF GLOUCESTER;
AND BY THE

REV. JOSEPH S. EXELL, M.A.

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Published by: glennpease on Apr 24, 2014
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THE PULPIT COMMETARY O HOSEA EDITED BY THE VERY REV. H. D. M. SPECE, D.D., DEA OF GLOUCESTER; AD BY THE REV. JOSEPH S. EXELL, M.A. There are no known copyright restrictions in the United States on the use of the text. WITH introductions' BY THE VE. ARCHDEACO F. W. FARRAR, D.D., F.R.S.— RT. REV. H, COTTERILL, D.D., F.R.S E. VERY REV. PRICIPAL J. TULLOCH, D.D.-REV. CAO G. RAWLISO, M.A, REV. A. PLUMMER, M.A., D.D. FUK & WAGALLS COMPAY ew York and Toeonto. HOSEA. Introbnction : By rev. W. J. DEAE, M.A.,
 
RECTOR OF ASHEH. (£^)iosiUon anh fomiletics: Bt rev. prof, J. J. GIVE, Ph.D., D.D., LATE PROFESSOR OF HEBREW AD HERMEBUTICS, MAGEE COLLEGE, LODOHDBSaT. i^omilieo bg Various <^utl)ors: REV. PROF. J. R. THOMSO, M.A. REV. A. ROWLAD, B.A., LL.R BEV. D. THOMAS, D.D. REV. C. JERDA, M.A., LL.B. REV. J. ORR, M.A., B.D. FUK & WAGALLS COMPAY ew Yoke and Toronto. THE BOOK OF HOSEA. ITRODUCTIO. S I. Sdbjbct or THE Book. In the Book of Hosea vre hare a summary of what the prophet tanght and felt daring his official career of some thirty years. His lot was cast in niotimfal times. If he did not live to see the actual destruction of the kingdom of Israel, he beheld it in prophetic vision a very short time before the terrible consummation ; and the causes that led to the overthrow were plain and open to his clear insight. Under Jeroboam II. Israel had been prosperous and successful, as she had never been since the days of David and Solomon. She had recovered much of the territory which those monarchs had held, and restored the ancient boundaries which had marked out the promised inheritance. As it is recorded in 2 Kings xiv. 25, 28, " He restored the coast of Israel from the entering of Hamath unto the sea of the plain . . . and warred, and recovered Damascus." But the curse of idolatry still remained, accompanied with other sins which defection from the Lord and the worship of strange gods always brought in their train. Impiety,
 
luxury, profligacy, everywhere abounded; and when Jeroboam died, and the strong hand which had checked the open turbulence and lawlessness of the people was removed, a scene of anarchy and confusion ensued, which gave sure token of coming vengeance. His son Zechariah was assassinated, after a reign of six months, by Shallum, who usurped the crown, and, after wearing it for one month, was himself murdered by one of his generals, Menahera. This cruel and wicked tyrant occupied the throne thus gained by bloodshed for ten years. His reign is chiefly remarkable for. the appearance of th(> Assyrians in the Holy Land under Pnl, who assumed the name of Tiglath- Pileser. To escape the attack of these stern invaders, Menahem became tributary to the Assyrians, and was confirmed in his kingdom at the price of a thousand talents of silver, which he exacted from the wealthiest of his subjects. His son Pekahiah, after a troubled reign of two years, was murdered by one of hia officers named Pekah, who seized the throne, aui souu. ^ ITBUDUCnOir TO held it for twenty yean aooording to the present reading in 1 Kings xr. 27 ; but there is some error in the namber, and probably we onght to read " two " instead of " twenty," as he was oonqnered by the Aasyrians and pnt to death B.C. 734, which was the seoond year of his reign. This man, in order to strongthen his position, formed a close alliance with Bezin of Damascns, and the two kings turned their arms against Jndah, in the hope of orer- throwing the dynasty of David. Jotham, the King of Jadah, in his extremity, called in the aid of the Assyrians, who devastated the territory of Damascns, took Samaria, pnt Pekah to death, and appointed Hoshea king in his place, exacting from him a large yearly tribute. The discontinnance of the tribute, which was efEected by the secret machinations of Egypt, under promises of support which were never fulfilled, led to another inroad of the Assyrians under Shalmaneser IV., the successor of Tiglath-Pileser. Hoshea was carried into captivity; and, after a siege of three years, Samaria fell into the hands of Sargpn, who had seized the Assyrian crown on the death of Shalmaneser, B.C. 722. Many of the people were deported into foreign countries, their places being partially filled by the introduction of heathen settlers, while much of the land became wholly depopulated. Thus ended the kingdom of Israel, brought to this miserable issue because its rulers and its people had done evil before the Lord continually. The moral condition of the people, as we conclude from the historical books and from intimations in Hosea's own pages, was exceedingly corrnpt ; that of Judah indeed was notoriously bad (as we see later from the denuiiL- ciations of Micah, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah), but it never fell into such