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The Ideal Vineyard

The Ideal Vineyard

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Published by glennpease
BY REV. JOHN NEWLAND MAFFITT,


Isaiah, v. 4, 5.

What could have been done more to my vineyard, that I have
not done in it? wherefore, when I looked that it should bring
forth grapes, brought it forth wild grapes? And now go to; I
will tell you what I will do to my vineyard; I will take away
the hedge thereof, and it shall be eaten up; and break down
the wall thereof, and it shall be trodden down.
BY REV. JOHN NEWLAND MAFFITT,


Isaiah, v. 4, 5.

What could have been done more to my vineyard, that I have
not done in it? wherefore, when I looked that it should bring
forth grapes, brought it forth wild grapes? And now go to; I
will tell you what I will do to my vineyard; I will take away
the hedge thereof, and it shall be eaten up; and break down
the wall thereof, and it shall be trodden down.

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Published by: glennpease on Apr 30, 2014
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THE IDEAL VIEYARDBY REV. JOH EWLAD MAFFITT, Isaiah, v. 4, 5. What could have been done more to my vineyard, that I have not done in it? wherefore, when I looked that it should bring forth grapes, brought it forth wild grapes? And now go to; I will tell you what I will do to my vineyard; I will take away the hedge thereof, and it shall be eaten up; and break down the wall thereof, and it shall be trodden down. The prophet Isaiah struck the solemn harp of prophecy with a masters hand. His mind was of such a sublime and tuneful mould, that had he lived in Greece, he would have been its Homer; or, in a later age, the Milton of classic England. The Spirit of the Highest had in- deed baptized him with the waters that flow "fast by the throne of God,** and given him power to lift the misty coverings from futurity — - to hold communion with events and circum- stances that were to be developed to mankind in some dark periods of the coming eternity ; yet native genius had set the impress of immor- tality upon the original structure of his mind, and placed in his hands the elements of moral 2 14 power. Language trembled under the weight of his glowing thoughts ; the figures of rheto- rical art were exhausted ; the scenery of nature, from the mountain's top, the throne of the
 
clouds, to the deep valley and the deeper world of waters, furnished his bold and impetuous imagery. In the chapter from which the text is select- ed, the state of the Jewish nation is represented under the type of a vineyard : Under the figure of a vine is represented the Jewish nation itself: Under that of soil, the country promised them by Jehovah: By the natural weakness of the vine, is repre- sented their need of a helper: •* By the care taken of it, the unbounded good- ness of God : By the unfruitfulness of this vine, the impious ingratitude of that people: And under the type of laying waste the vine- yard, the signal punishment in store for their aggravated transgressions. THE VIE. It was a goodly vine, planted by the hand of God. It was written, thou hast brought a vine out of Egypt; thou hast cast out the heathen and planted it ; thou hast caused it to take deep root and it filled the land: the hills were cover- 15 ed with its shadow, and the boughs thereof were
 
like goodly cedars. God chose his servant Abraham, to be the progenitor of the people represented by this beautiful allegory. He had commanded him to leave his native country, and to journey to a strange land, and in obedience to the voice of God, he set out without wavering, not knowing whither he was going. He was tried in the tenderest point, by being commanded to sacri- fice the life of an only son — an only child, and he proved faithful. God made a covenant with him, and promised, that his seed should inherit the land where he was a stranger, even the land of Canaan, for an everlasting possession: and that through him, all the nations of the earth should be blessed. THE GOODESS OF THE SOIL I WHICH IT WAS PLATED. m This has a direct and particular reference to the land of Canaan, which was one of the most fertile countries in the world. It was so beauti- ful and so productive, that it was emphatically styled the vineyard of the Lord, the garden of the world, a good land and large, a land flow- ing with milk and honey. It was a country rich in corn, wine, and oil, covered with trees, plants, fruits, and flowers in the greatest profu- sion. The whole face of the country was diver- sified with a multitude of valleys, and hills, and 16 mountains; adorned with the most beautiful

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