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The Starkville Dispatch eEdition 4-30-14

The Starkville Dispatch eEdition 4-30-14

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Published by: The Dispatch on Apr 30, 2014
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06/18/2014

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WEATHER
Kelsie Nicole Gerhart
Fourth grade, New Hope 
High
71
 Low
46
Mostly sunny 
Full forecast on page 2A.
FIVE QUESTIONS
1
 Whose birthday do the people of Bermuda celebrate on the second Monday in June?
2
 Where in Beijing did Chinese stu-dents build a Goddess of Democracy in May 1989?
3
 How many strings do most guitars have?
4
 What is the common name for the fluid expelled from the body through the process of lacrimation?
5
 How many balls are normally racked in the triangle in pocket billiards?
 
Answers, 10B
INSIDE
Classifieds
8B
Comics
7B
Obituaries
5A
Opinions
6A
DISPATCH CUSTOMER SERVICE 328-2424 | NEWSROOM 328-2471
E
STABLISHED
 1879 | C
OLUMBUS
, M
ISSISSIPPI
CDISPATCH.COM
 F R E E !
W
EDNESDAY
 | A
PRIL
 30, 2014
CALENDAR
 Thursday, May 1
 Lowndes Day of Prayer:
 In conjunc-tion with the National Day of Prayer, the privately-funded Christian Community Organization invites citizens of Colum-bus and surrounding areas to join in an observance outside the Lowndes Coun-ty Courthouse at 502 Second Ave. N.
Friday and Saturday, May 2-3
 Market Street Festival:
 Columbus’ annual festival kicks off May 2 at the Riverwalk with a free evening concert by Almost Famous of Memphis, Tenn. Saturday features arts and crafts vendors, live music and fun activities all day downtown. Look for more infor-mation soon at marketstreetfestival.com or contact Main Street Columbus, 662-328-6305.
PUBLIC MEETINGS
May 5:
 Lowndes County Board of Supervisors, Court-house, 9 a.m.
May 5:
 Clay County Board of Supervisors, Courthouse, 9 a.m.
May 5:
 Caledonia Board of Alderman, town hall at 6 p.m.
May 8:
 Clay County Board of Supervisors, Courthouse, 9 a.m.
May 9:
 Lowndes County School Board, Central Office, 11 a.m.
May 12:
 Columbus Munic-ipal School Board, Central office, 6 p.m.
May 15:
 Lowndes County Board of Supervisors, Court-house, 9 a.m.
LOCAL FOLKS
Izzy Paros
is in fifth grade at Cook Elementary. She is the daughter of Leslie Stratzves.
Mary Alice Weeks/Dispatch Staff 
Casey Blair clears branches from Lonny and Wanda Nickoles’ home on Lacy Drive in New Hope on Monday morning following a bout of thunderstorms and tornadoes that tore through northeast Mississippi on Monday night.
BY SARAH FOWLER 
sfowler@cdispatch.com
COLUMBUS — The Columbus Police Depart-ment has an interim chief.In a unanimous vote, the Columbus City Coun-cil put Tony Carleton into the position during a specially called meeting  Wednesday morning.Former chief Selvain McQueen retired earlier this month after serving as chief for less than three  years. He earned $70,000 a year in the position. Assistant Chief Joe  Johnson has been in charge of the department since McQueen’s depar-ture.Carleton, an 18-year law enforcement veteran, has served as assis-tant chief  with CPD since he  was hired in November. Before his hiring, he served as chief of police in  Tupelo. He resigned from that position to come to Columbus. He was earning $65,000 as assistant chief. He will earn $67,500 as interim. A graduate of the Mis-sissippi Law Enforcement  Training Academy, Car-leton has a bachelor’s de-gree in public administra-tion with an emphasis in criminal justice from the University of Mississippi. He graduated from the FBI National Academy in November.Mayor Robert Smithsaid he hopes the city will
 AFTER THE STORM
Neighbors help neighbors in storm’s aftermath
BY NATHAN GREGORY 
ngregory@cdispatch.com
COLUMBUS — Beverly Smith lives with her 86-year-old mother, Alice Nickoles, at the corner of Lacy and Hutcherson roads in east Lowndes County. On Tuesday afternoon, they were approaching 24 hours without power, but were in good spirits.Carolyn Nickoles was helping Smith clean up the yard. Wearing gloves, they stacked limbs in a pile.“This is nothing compared to some folks,” Carolyn Nickoles said, acknowledging the more extensive damage half a mile away near Pleas-ant Hill Road. “We’re blessed.” Approximately, 1,009 4-County Electric customers were still without power Tuesday after Monday after-noon’s severe weather hit particularly hard in New Hope. 4-County commu-nications specialist Brad Barr said all of those are likely in Lowndes Coun-ty. Seventy-two people are working to restore power to those homes. It is expected for a majority of them to have power again this evening, Barr said.Columbus Lowndes Emergency Management Agency Director Cindy Lawrence said about 100 homes county-wide received damage.
INSIDE
 
SOUTH:
 Storms cut devastating path through the South,
PAGE 3A.
 
ALABAMA:
 Damage minimal in Lamar County,
PAGE 4A.
 
SLIMANTICS:
 East Columbus neighborhood rallies in storm’s aftermath,
PAGE 6A.
 
PARTIAL TO HOME:
 Rays ride out storm at Tabernacle Road home,
PAGE 6A.
 
LOUISVILLE:
 Search continues for missing boy; Louisville ER doctor clings to patient in terrifying tug-of- war,
PAGE 8A.
 
RACE TRACK:
 Destroyed race track will soon recover, manager vows,
PAGE 9A.
 
TUPELO:
 Noted Tupelo swimmer is lone fatality in Tusca-loosa,
PAGE 2B.
Columbus City Council names Carleton as Interim Chief 
William Browning/Dispatch Staff 
Rev. Robert Gavin, the pastor of Springfield M.B. Church on Highway 45 South, on Tuesday looks at what is left of the church following Monday’s storms. Mary Gavin, his wife, came with him to see the damage.
 Tornado levels Lowndes Co. church
BY WILLIAM BROWNING
wbrowning@cdispatch.com
 A tornado completely destroyed Springfield M.B. Church on Monday.It had stood for nearly 150 years in a field on the east side of Highway 45 South, down toward Macon.  A small, old cemetery is be-hind it. A large limb that had snapped off of a nearby oak tree laid through the head-stones. Where the church once  was is now only rubble. Ev-erything seems to have fall-en toward the north when the storm came through. Bricks and paneling are strewn about.  The only thing left en-tirely intact by the tornado’s  winds is a wooden cross adorned with a purple sash near where the front en-trance once stood.  The Rev. Robert Gavin has served as pastor for about three years. It’s a small con-gregation.Gavin learned about the destruction not long after it happened around 6 p.m. Mon-day. A church trustee knows a Lowndes County deputy,  who happened to pass by and saw what had happened, and the word spread.
Pastor: ‘The church is flat’
See
CHURCH 
, 10A
Carleton
See
COLUMBUS
, 9A
EMA: 12 mobile homes destroyed, 100 damaged
Has served as assistant chief since Nov.
See
CARLETON 
, 9A
 
T
HE
 D
ISPATCH
 • www.cdispatch.com
2A
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014
DID YOU HEAR?
CONTACTING THE DISPATCHSUBSCRIPTIONS
The Commercial Dispatch (USPS 142-320)Published daily except Saturday. Entered at the post office at Columbus, Mississippi. Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, MSPOSTMASTER, Send address changes to: The Commercial Dispatch, P.O. Box 511, Columbus, MS 39703Published by Commercial Dispatch Publishing Company Inc., 516 Main St., Columbus, MS 39703
Office hours:
n
 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon-Fri
Main line:
n
 662-328-2424
Report a missing paper?
n
 662-328-2424 ext. 100
n
 Toll-free 877-328-2430
n
 Operators are on duty until 6 p.m. Mon.-Fri. and 6:30 - 9:30 a.m. Sun.
Buy an ad?
n
 662-328-2424
Report a news tip?
n
 662-328-2471
n
 news@cdispatch.com
Email a letter to the editor?
n
 voice@cdispatch.com
Report a sports score?
n
 662-241-5000
Submit a calendar item?
n
 Go to www.cdispatch.com/ community
Submit a birth, wedding or anniversary announce-ment?
n
 Download forms at www.cdispatch.com.lifestyles
HOW DO I ...
Physical address:
 516 Main St., Columbus, MS 39701
Mailing address:
 P.O. Box 511, Columbus, MS 39703-0511
Starkville Office:
 101 S. Lafayette St. #16, Starkville, MS 39759
HOW TO SUBSCRIBE
By phone
 ................................662-328-2424 or 877-328-2430
Online
 .........................................www.cdispatch.com/subscribe
RATES
Daily home delivery + unlimited online access* .........$11.50/mo.Sunday only delivery + unlimited online access* ..........$7.50/mo.Daily home delivery only* ................................................$11/mo.Online access only* ......................................................$7.95/mo.1 month daily home delivery ..................................................$121 month Sunday only home delivery .......................................$7Mail Subscription Rates ...................................................$20/mo.
* EZ Pay rate requires automatic processing of credit or debit card.
Five-Day forecast for the Golden Triangle
Almanac DataNational WeatherLake LevelsRiver StagesSun and MoonSolunar table
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
City Hi Lo W Hi Lo WCity Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Weather(W
):
s
-sunny,
pc
-partly cloudy,
c
-cloudy,
i
-ice,
sh
-showers,
t
-thunderstorms,
r
-rain,
sf 
-snow flurries,
sn
-snow
Yesterday 7 a.m. 24-hr.Lake Capacity yest. change
 The solunar period schedule allows planning days so you will be fishing in good territory or hunting in good cover during those times.
TemperaturePrecipitation
Tombigbee
Yesterday Flood 7 a.m. 24-hr.River stage yest. change
Columbus Tuesday 
High/low ..................................... 82°/62°Normal high/low ......................... 80°/54°Record high ............................ 89° (1957)Record low .............................. 40° (1965)Tuesday ........................................... 0.02"Month to date ................................. 8.56"Normal month to date ...................... 4.65"Year to date .................................. 20.83"Normal year to date ....................... 20.40"
 Thursday Friday
Atlanta 70 50 pc 71 50 pcBoston 67 51 r 65 49 pcChicago 51 42 r 57 41 cDallas 73 48 pc 80 53 sHonolulu 83 70 pc 84 72 pcJacksonville 84 64 t 73 54 rMemphis 67 48 pc 70 53 pc
69°45°
Thursday
Partly sunny 
71°46°
Friday
Intervals of clouds and sun
77°51°
Saturday
Mostly sunny and pleasant
85°56°
Sunday
Nice with plenty of sunshineAberdeen Dam 188' 168.80' +0.30'Stennis Dam 166' 138.51' +0.30'Bevill Dam 136' 136.44' -0.02'Amory 20' 11.86' -0.59'Bigbee 14' 5.26' -2.25'Columbus 15' 7.09' +0.73'Fulton 20' 15.22' +6.96'Tupelo 21' 4.00' +2.80'
NewMay 28LastMay 21FullMay 14FirstMay 6
Sunrise ..... 6:06 a.m.Sunset ...... 7:36 p.m.Moonrise ... 7:09 a.m.Moonset .... 9:13 p.m.
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc.
 ©2014
Major ..... 2:09 a.m.Minor ..... 8:22 a.m.Major ..... 2:35 p.m.Minor ..... 8:48 p.m.Major ..... 3:05 a.m.Minor ..... 9:18 a.m.Major ..... 3:31 p.m.Minor ..... 9:43 p.m.
ThursdayWednesday Thursday Friday
Nashville 66 44 pc 67 47 cOrlando 89 70 t 85 68 tPhiladelphia 76 53 pc 69 48 pcPhoenix 90 68 s 93 72 sRaleigh 78 54 t 69 50 pcSalt Lake City 68 49 s 76 56 sSeattle 87 51 s 74 49 pc
Tonight
Mainly clear
44°
Wednesday 
‘Idol’ winner to help reopen Washington Monument
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
 WASHINGTON “American Idol” winner Candice Glover will help reopen the Washington Monument, which has been closed since a 2011 earthquake.Organizers say the R&B singer will join the Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps, U.S. Navy Band and boy and girl choris-ters of the Washington National Cathedral Choir for the May 12 re-opening ceremony. Glover will sing “America, the Beautiful.” The “Today” show’s Al Ro-ker will host the event.Interior Secretary Sal-ly Jewell, National Park Service Director Jonathan  Jarvis and philanthropist David Rubenstein will help celebrate. Rubenstein do-nated $7.5 million to cover half the restoration cost. The 130-year-old me-morial has been closed since a 5.8-magnitude earthquake caused dam-age in August 2011. Work-ers have repaired more than 150 cracks in the 555-foot obelisk.Normally the monu-ment draws about 700,000  visitors a year.
AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File
This 2013 file photo shows American Idol 2013 winner Candice Glover on Capitol Hill in Washington. Glover from “American Idol” will help reopen the Washington Monument, which has been closed since a 2011 earth-quake.
Scene&Seen
RELAY FOR LIFE
Weather was great for the Lowndes County Relay for Life event for the American Cancer Society April 25 at Colum-bus High School.
Pamela McKinney, Mary Wicks, Layne and Tommy HallBrenda Ferguson, Mary Coleman, Pamela Colvin, Cassandra DentMarie, Tommy and Priscilla Coggin, Ron, Jennifer and Sammie St. JohnEliza Moore, Kayla, Lloyd, Makayla and Terrill Bell, Eunice HarrisonPerry Watkins, Bontre McCray, Chris CraddiethTim Denning, Tricia Cox, Rose and Lloyd Pate
 
No matter who You are...What You’ve done, or whatYou failed to do...You are accepted!A child of Almighty God!
 C O M E !
Walk withUSon this journey called life.
Covenant United Methodist Church
31st Avenue, Columbus • Behind K-Mart
Worship: Sunday 11am
1st & 3rd Sunday 6pm at Beans & Cream
    ©     T    h   e    D    i   s   p   a    t   c    h
Site closed since 2011 earthquake
 
ONLINE SUBSCRIPTIONS
For less than $1 per month, print subscribers can get unlimited access to story comments, extra photos, newspaper archives and much more with an online subscription. Nonsubscribers can purchase online access for less than $8 per month.
Go to www.cdispatch.com/subscribe
MSU SPORTS BLOG
Visit The Dispatch MSU Sports Blog for breaking Bulldog news:
www.cdispatch.com/msusports
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014
3A
In Spine Surgery
NMMC’s neurosurgeons pictured (left to right): R. Hunt Bobo, M.D., Elbert White, IV, M.D., FACS, Walter Eckman, M.D., Carl Bevering, III, M.D., Louis Rosa, III, M.D., FACS 
Named a Blue Distinction Center of Excellence for spine surgery by BlueCross BlueShield of Mississippi
For you that means confidence that you’ll receive quality care in a safe, efficient and cost-effective manner with North Mississippi Medical Center’s Neurosurgical Services. To learn more, visit nmhs.net/spine_center.php.
Spine Surgery
 
for
 
Spine Surgery
Improving
outcomes
127 Airline Road, Columbus, MS 39702
FAIRVIEW
B A P T I S T C H U R C H
love God • love people
55+
 S t  t   y 
Registration begins at 8:30amRally begins at 9:00am
Featuring:
Geraldine & Ricky, Paid in Full and Mississippi State University Jazz Band
Love Offering will be collected.
Call the church office for more information at 662-328-2924.
    ©     T    h   e    D    i   s   p   a    t   c    h
May 1
at 
BY ADRIAN SAINZ AND JEFF AMY 
The Associated Press
LOUISVILLE — Ruth Bennett died clutching the last child left at her day care center as a tor-nado wiped the building off its foundation. A fire-fighter who came upon the body gently pulled the toddler from her arms.“It makes you just take a breath now,” said next-door neighbor Ken-neth Billingsley, who witnessed the scene at what was left of Ruth’s Child Care Center in this logging town of 6,600. “It makes you pay attention to life.”Bennett, 53, was among at least 35 people killed in a two-day outbreak of twisters and other violent weather that pulverized homes from the Midwest to the Deep South. The child, whose name was not released, was alive when she was pulled from Bennett’s arms and was taken to a hospital. Her condition was not known. As crews in Mississippi and Alabama turned from search-and-rescue efforts to cleanup, forecasters began to downplay their initially dire predictions of a third round of deadly twisters Tuesday. Mete-orologists said the storm system had weakened substantially by evening, although some tornado watches and warnings were still in effect for iso-lated areas.In North Carolina, the National Weather Service reported tornado touch-downs in five counties  Tuesday, but the twist-ers caused only moder-ate structural damage to homes and toppled some trees. Two cities in the state reported extensive flooding from the storm system. No injuries were reported.One of the hardest-hit areas in Monday eve-ning’s barrage of twisters  was Tupelo, where a gas station looked as if it had been stepped on by a gi-ant.Francis Gonzalez, who also owns a convenience store and Mexican restau-rant attached to the ser- vice station, took cover  with her three children and two employees in the store’s cooler as the roof over the gas pumps  was reduced to aluminum shards.“My Lord, how can all this happen in just one second?” she said in Span-ish.On Tuesday, the growl of chain saws cut through the otherwise still, hazy morning in Tupelo. Mas-sive oak trees, knocked over like toys, blocked roads. Neighbors helped one another cut away limbs.“This does not even look like a place that I’m familiar with right now,” said Pam Montgomery,  walking her dog in her neighborhood. “You look down some of the streets, and it doesn’t even look like there is a street.”By the government’s preliminary count, 11 tornadoes — including one that killed 15 people in Arkansas — struck the nation’s midsection on Sunday, and at least 25 ravaged the South on Monday, the National  Weather Service Storm Prediction Center said. Among those killed  was 21-year-old University of Alabama swimmer and dean’s list student John Servati, who was taking shelter in the basement of a Tuscaloosa home when a retaining wall collapsed on him.His death — and that of at least two others in  Alabama — came the day after the third anniversa -ry of an outbreak of more than 60 tornadoes that killed more than 250 peo-ple across the state.In Kimberly, Ala., north of Birmingham, the firehouse was among the buildings heavily dam-aged.Four firefighters suf-fered little more than cuts and scrapes, but the bays over the fire trucks  were destroyed, and the  vehicles were covered  with red bricks, concrete blocks and pieces of the roof. The trucks were es-sentially trapped, so the town had to rely on near-by communities for emer-gency help.
Forecasters downplay 3rd-day dire predictions
‘It makes you pay attention to life’
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
 JACKSON — A former police chief in Mississip-pi has been sentenced to five years in federal pris-on for conspiring to de-mand money and property from people in exchange for dropping criminal charges.Former Mendenhall Po-lice Chief Donald “Bruce” Barlow pleaded guilty in to one count in federal court in January. Barlow, 50, had been charged with 17 counts, including witness intimidation.He also was sentenced  Tuesday to three years’ supervised release. Pros-ecutors say restitution will be determined at a July 10 hearing.Prosecu-tors say Bar-low some-times made people sign over their  vehicles in exchange for him dropping charges and also demanded cash payments, in one case $4,500.Prosecutors say Barlow tried to cover up his deal-ings when he learned of the federal investigation.
Former Mississippi police chief sentenced
Five year sentence for 17 counts, including witness intimidation
Barlow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
 JACKSON The Southern Companies says the expected startup date of its coal gas-fired power plant in Kemper County is being pushed back to the first half of 2015.In a regulatory filing Tuesday with the Securi-ties and Exchange Com-mission, the company also says the plant’s cost is ex-pected to rise by $196 mil-lion to a total of about $5.4 billion. The Atlanta-based com-pany says it will take a pre-tax charge of $380 million — $235 million after taxes — against its income for the first quarter of 2014. A spokesman for South-ern-affiliate Mississippi Power Company says the utility will not seek to re-cover the increased costs from ratepayers.Earlier this month the company blamed poor  weather, unexpected turn-over of construction em-ployees and installation inefficiencies for contrib-uting to extra costs.
Kemper power plant will cost more
Start-up delayed until 2015 also
BY SETH BORENSTEIN
 P Science Writer 
 WASH-INGTON — Weather from nearly all parts of the country combined to brew this week’s killer tor-nadoes. To get tornadoes especially the big deadly kind — everything has to come together in just the right way and it hadn’t been doing that lately, said meteorologist Greg Carbin at the Storm Pre-diction Center in Norman, Okla.Until the weekend, there had been relatively few significant twisters this year across the Unit-ed States — just 20 and no deaths.But the conditions were right on Sunday in the cen-tral U.S.Dry, cool air swooped off California’s Sierra Madre and southern Rocky mountains. That sat on top warm, moist air from the Gulf of Mexico, creating thunderstorms.  And the jet stream brought in wind shear, which helps provide rotation.Cook that all with day-time heating and it makes a tornado outbreak, mete-orologists say. What makes this out-break unusual is that it is essentially stalled, Carbin said. The slow-moving jet stream plunging from the Northwest is keeping a large, high-pressure sys-tem off the East Coast.  And that’s preventing the tornado-prone weather from moving east and  weakening. That could mean more storms in across the South, maybe into Wednesday.In the past few decades, the U.S. has averaged about 1,250 tornadoes a  year. Last year, which also had a slow start, ended  with 908 tornadoes that killed 55 people.“You expect to see one or two outbreaks like this each spring and certainly  we were due,” said Jeff Masters, meteorology director of the private  Weather Underground.
Right mix of conditions brewed tornado outbreak
Weather from nearly all parts of the country combined to create this week’s killer tornadoes
ONLINE:
 
Storm Prediction Center:
 spc.noaa.gov/
Mary Alice Weeks/Dispatch Staff 
Damaged vehicles are seen near the remains of East Main Automotive on Main Street in Louisville on Tuesday morning after an EF-4 tornado tore through Winston County on Monday night.

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