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Accrual Accounting for the Public Sector – a fad that has had its day?

Accrual Accounting for the Public Sector – a fad that has had its day?

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Published by Andy Wynne
For the last decade accrual accounting has been presented as the reform for public sector accounting and the basis for the wider New Public Management reforms and the marketisation of the public sector (Barton 2005, Ellwood and Newberry 2007, Ouda 2004 & 2005, Wynne 2007, etc). However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the claimed benefits of introducing accrual accounting are not being realised in practice. In the few countries which have actually adopted this reform, for example, Australia New Zealand and the UK, the evidence is now suggesting that, if their governments’ knew then what they know now, that the move to accrual accounting may never have taken place (Dorotinsky, 2008).
For the last decade accrual accounting has been presented as the reform for public sector accounting and the basis for the wider New Public Management reforms and the marketisation of the public sector (Barton 2005, Ellwood and Newberry 2007, Ouda 2004 & 2005, Wynne 2007, etc). However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the claimed benefits of introducing accrual accounting are not being realised in practice. In the few countries which have actually adopted this reform, for example, Australia New Zealand and the UK, the evidence is now suggesting that, if their governments’ knew then what they know now, that the move to accrual accounting may never have taken place (Dorotinsky, 2008).

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Published by: Andy Wynne on May 05, 2014
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11/01/2014

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Accrual Accounting for the Public Sector
 – 
a fad that has had its day?
 Andy Wynne andywynne@lineone.netThe latest issue of the
International Journal of Governmental Financial Management 
 (www.icgfm.org/digest.htm) contains a useful review of the experience of implementing accrual accounting by central governments. ts findings should increase the number of governments which have considered this approach! but have decided that other reforms are more important and are more li"ely to deliver significant benefits. #or the last decade accrual accounting has been presented as
the
 reform for public sector accounting. $owever! it is becoming increasingly clear that the claimed benefits of introducing accrual accounting are not being realised in practice. #ew countries have actually adopted accrual accounting as the basis for their central government accounts. %pain was possibly the first in &'' followed by the celebrated case of ew *ealand. A few other governments followed suit over the next decade or so! but! according to Wynne (+,,-)! by +,, still only around &, of the nearly +,, governments in the world had adopted accrual accounting. n Australia! ew *ealand and the 0 the evidence now suggests that! if their governments1 "new then what they "now now! then the move to accrual accounting may never have ta"en place (2orotins"y! +,,). Wynne1s most recent paper on this topic reviews the evidence which is available from these countries so that governments considering this type of reform can base their decisions on the actual experience of those few countries which have adopted this approach. 3ust as the current world recession is undermining the previously dominant view on the efficacy of the free mar"et! so the failure of accrual accounting to deliver on its promises is having a demoralising effect on at least some of its previous supporters. %upporters of the move to accrual accounting argue that a range of significant benefits are available to governments which move from the cash to the accrual basis of accounting. %uch arguments have been widely reported and repeated at many conferences. $owever! the authoritative independent research which is now available suggests that few! if any! of these benefits have been actually achieved in practice. n contrast! the costs of moving to accrual accounting are accepted as being substantial.%ome governments may consider that a move to accrual accounting will provide the opportunity for a complete overhaul of their financial management systems through the adoption of leading edge twenty first century reforms. $owever! oel $epworth (+,,4) argues against such a strategy and recommends that5
before this reform [accrual accounting] is introduced, cash accounting should be robust, control should be secure, external audit should be functioning well and the legislature should have an ability to call the executive to account.
(page 4-)%everal leading 6782 countries are still not convinced of the overall benefits of moving to full accrual accounting and budgeting! for example! 8hina! 9ermany! taly! 3apan and :ussia. A recent multi;country overview by the % 9eneral Accountability 6ffice also concluded <Accrual =udgeting useful in certain areas but does not provide sufficient information for reporting on our nation1s longer;term fiscal challenge>. This reinforces growing recent scepticism on the value of a full transition to accrual accounting and budgeting. The full article is available for free download from5 http5//tinyurl.com/ceu?-+

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