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Being Doers of the Word

Being Doers of the Word

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Published by glennpease
BY THOMAS SCOTT


JAMES I. 22—25.

But be ye doers of the word, and not hearers onb/^
deceiving your oum selves. For, if any be a
hearer of the word, and not a doer, he is like
unto a man beholding his natural face in n
glass : far he beholdeth himself, and goeth his
way, and straightway forgetteth what manner
of man he was. But whoso looketh into the
perfect law of liberty, and continueth therein,
he being not a forgetful hearer, but a doer of
the work, this man shall be blessed in his deed.
BY THOMAS SCOTT


JAMES I. 22—25.

But be ye doers of the word, and not hearers onb/^
deceiving your oum selves. For, if any be a
hearer of the word, and not a doer, he is like
unto a man beholding his natural face in n
glass : far he beholdeth himself, and goeth his
way, and straightway forgetteth what manner
of man he was. But whoso looketh into the
perfect law of liberty, and continueth therein,
he being not a forgetful hearer, but a doer of
the work, this man shall be blessed in his deed.

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Published by: glennpease on May 07, 2014
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BEIG DOERS OF THE WORDBY THOMAS SCOTTJAMES I. 22—25. But be ye doers of the word, and not hearers onb/^ deceiving your oum selves. For, if any be a hearer of the word, and not a doer, he is like unto a man beholding his natural face in n glass : far he beholdeth himself, and goeth his way, and straightway forgetteth what manner of man he was. But whoso looketh into the perfect law of liberty, and continueth therein, he being not a forgetful hearer, but a doer of the work, this man shall be blessed in his deed. The apostle James seems to have espeeially in- tended his epistle as an antidote to the delusion of those who abused the doctrines of gnee; and who, expectang salvation by a dead fieddi, con- sidered good works as altogedier superfluous. This may account for die remarkable di£fereace between his language and that of St. Faul^ who was chiefly emfdoyed in contending against such as ran into the ot^posite extreme. Having there* fore shewn that ten^>tations and sins must not be ascribed to God, the unchangeable giver of every good and perfect gift ; abd observed that the word of truth is the grand means of regenerating sin- ners, and rendering them willing to consecrate themselves to God ; he gives some directions con- cerning the manner in which men hear and receive
 
JAMES L 93^26. M3 the divine message, that it. may be '^ in them an ^^ engrafted word, able Jto tave tiieir souls/* He then introduces tibe passage which I have chosen for , the subject of our present meditation, and con- cludes with Hiese remarkable words : ^^ If any man among you seem to be rddgious, and bridletb not his tongue, but deeeiveth his own heart; this man*s rdigicm is vain. Pure religion and ^^ undefiled bdfore God and the Father is this ; to ^' visit the fatheiless and widows in their aflSiction, ^^ and to keep himself unspotted from the world.'* The religion which God approves, when viewed apart from the principles wlbence it springs, and the ordinances through/ which it is produced end maintained, is diiefly manifested by self-denying kindness to men for the Lord*s.sake, and separation from all the pollutions of this evil world. ^'ow,** says St. Paul, '^ afaideth fisdth, hope, and charity ; ^^ but the greatest of these is charity.** The text viewed in this connexion, may give us an opportunity of considering, I. The pecufiar intent of revelation, and the purposes which it was evidently intended to answer: JI. The inefficacTjT of hearing without practising, to accomplish any of these purposes : III. The nature and sources of that &tal self- deception into which numbers are in this respect betrayed:
 
IV. The contrast betwixt the mere hearer and the practical student of scripture. I. We consider the peculiar intent of revelation^ and the purposes which it was evidently intended to anawer* <?84 SERMO XIII : *^ The Lord made all things fw himsdf/* that in different ways they might manifest his glory. The inanimate creation, in every part, proclaims his wisdom/power, and goodness, and demonstrates his being and perfections. ^^ The heavens declare the glory of God, and the firmament shewetii his handy-work.** Each of the animal tribes an- swers the end of its creaticm, and enjoys all the felicity of which it is capable ; except as involved in' the consequences of our sins. But rational creatures should glorify their Maker in a higher manner ; being formed capable of understanding the display he has given of himself in his wx)rks, and of rendering him the reasonable service of ador ration and obedience : in which, as connected with the inefiiEible enjoyment of his love, their genuine felicity consists. Yet, without at all considering the dijSerence observable in men*s characters, it is undeniable that all ^^ have forsaken the fountain of living waters : and have hewn out for them- selves cisterns, broken cisterns that can hold no ^' water.** This is the universal apostacy and idolatry of the human race : they are all *' alienated " from the life of God.*' one seek their happi- ness in knowing, loving, obeying, and worshipping him ; but all, if left to themselves, idolize the

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