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Pedicabs

Pedicabs

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Published by DanKoller3
Here's an example of how a story about a government meeting can have a creative, engaging lede.
Here's an example of how a story about a government meeting can have a creative, engaging lede.

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Categories:Presentations
Published by: DanKoller3 on May 07, 2014
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05/07/2014

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BY DAN KOLLER
Staff Writer
’Twas the night before Christmas, and all through the town, not a pedicab was stirring; their application was turned down.
The Highland Park Town Council on Monday approved an ordinance that prohibits pedicab  businesses. The legislation came after one company sought a permit to run pedicab tours through the town’s streets during the Christmas season.“We just didn’t see that there was a crying need for these types of things in our community, as a business,” Mayor Joel Williams said.For the uninitiated, a pedicab is a passen-ger vehicle powered by a cyclist. Robert Tobolowsky of Dallas Pedicabs, the company that applied for a permit, was understand-ably disappointed by the council’s decision.“We’re not happy. We were trying to meet a demand we saw for our services,” he said in a phone interview.Tobolowsky’s company, which he co-owns with four fellow SMU gradu-ates, operates pedicabs in Uptown, downtown,  Victory Park, and Deep Ellum. He said he and his partners wanted to expand to Highland Park for the holiday season, to com-pete with the horse-drawn carriage tours inspired  by the town’s extensive Christmas-light displays.“We’re obviously not as
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2012
TEXAS’ BEST WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
ONE DOLLAR
SCHOOLS & EDUCATION
These teachers are big characters
[ 1B ]
SCOTS SPORTS
Tennis team enjoys 100-win streak
[ 1C ]
MAD FORPLAID
Annual campaignneeds your help
[ 1D ]
The 2012 Texas Rangers have broken our hearts.”
 — TALMAGE BOSTON
(See Page 12A)
BY GEORGIA FISHER
Staff Writer
Some people think Love Field’s name is a tribute to Southwest Airlines; a nod to the company’s heart logo, perhaps, or its “LUV” ticker symbol, or the brand of all-around lovey-dovi-ness that has endeared it to discount flyers since the early 1970s. Not so. The airline’s  branding was inspired by the field, not the other way around. And the field is named for a person. And the person — one Moss Lee Love, a first lieuten-ant in the 11th Calvary, who died in a 1913 prac-tice flight over San Diego — will be honored all over again when a permanent art installation comes to the airport on Oct. 26.
 Back in a Moment
, Love Field’s new interior court- yard from Dallas sculptor
Town Prohibits Pedicab Businesses
Highland Park may alter rules for horse carriages
See PEDICABS, Page 15A
omenFight ForDilutedGender
Band Now Looks as Good as it Sounds
PHOTO: RANDY HAGENS
The Highlander Band debuted new uniforms last week that feature tartan plaid fabric acquired directly from Scotland.
Story on Page 10A
BY ANDREW PLOCK
taff Writer
 About two and a half ears ago, Beverly Hill awoke from a dream that as hard to forget.She was left with a vivid mage of a clothesline suspended high off the round, with pairs of baby ooties dangling from the strand. The shoes hung n the line, one foot apart, as far as the eye could see n either direction. As a sculptor, ideas like this ould be inspiration for ill’s next piece. But she new it was reserved for ne thing — something she ad been rallying against or quite some time.“The dream woke me up n the middle of the night,” ill said. “I thought, ‘I now this is about gender-ide.’ ”
Nine months later, the niversity Park resident egan the Gendercide wareness Project, a roup designed to raise awareness of the elimina-ion of millions of females
BY BRADFORD PEARSON
Staff Writer
The Highland Park Community League has  been fined $200, after a Texas Ethics Commission investigation revealed that the group violated various campaign laws.In its Aug. 30 decision, the commission deter-mined that the league “represented in campaign communications that a candidate held an elec-tive public office that he did not hold and did not include the highway right-of-way notice on political advertising.” The candi-date in question is cur-rent Mayor Joel Williams. The sign read “Highland Park Community League Endorses Mayor: Joel Williams,” then listed the other candidates for the Town Council. The com-mission held that the sign should have included the word “for,” as in “Highland Park Community League Endorses Joel Williams For Mayor.In the resolution, the
HP Election SignsLead to Small Fine
PHOTO: BRADFORD PEARSON
The signs should have made it clearer that Joel Williams was not the mayor, the ruling said.
League implied Williams was already mayor
 Airports New Piece Inspired by Lt. Love
Sherry Owens is creating seven 12-foot trees for
Back in a Moment 
, an art installation she will soon bring to Love Field.
Installation will include tribute to its namesake
See LEAGUE, Page 14ASee LOVE, Page 14A
Group aims to raise awareness of gendercide
See GENDERCIDE, Page 13A
Couple Puts New Spin on Old Furnishings
BY WILLIAM JAMES GERLICH
Staff Writer
 After a trip to London decades ago, University Park residents Dudley and Aimee Simms became obsessed with Old English design. So much so, that they wanted people in Dallas to enjoy it as well. You may remember Highgate House as a pop-up shop in Highland Park Village or Snider Plaza,  but the antique store now has a permanent home in the Design District, which attests to the owners’ pas-sion to building their busi-ness and brand. Approaching the first anniversary for their Dragon Street location, the Simms have branched out from their origi-nal aesthetic, featuring contemporary artists in their store. On Saturday, dovetailing with Dragon Street’s annual gallery walk, Highgate House will have an artist reception for three painters who Dudley said complements the store’s English aes-thetic beautifully.“We recently transi-tioned to selling contem-porary art, because it looks great with our traditional dark furniture we sell in
Contemporary artists displayed at antique store
PHOTO: EMILIA GASTON
A trip to London inspired Dudley and Aimee Simms of University Park to launch their store, Highgate House.
See HIGHGATE, Page 15A

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