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Table Of Contents

TRANSLATED BY BRIAN N. WATSON
1. Establishment of the Kodokan
2. Pain is a Good Teacher
3. Kanekichi Fukushima
4. Master Masatomo Iso
5. My Study of Kito Jujutsu
6. University Days
7. Sporting Activities
8. From Jujutsu to Judo
11. Regrets
12. Te Kodokan Oath
13. Kosuke Shirai
14. A Fruitless Search
15. Te Warehouse Dojo
16. Te Kami Niban-cho Dojo
17. Educational Responsibilities
18. Te Origin of Kano Juku
19. School Rules
20. New Year’s Day Ceremony
21. Te Vital Principle of Randori
22. Te Kito Jujutsu Densho
23. Te Purpose of Kodokan Judo
24. Deterioration of Randori
25. Correct Randori Posture
26. Competitive Judo
27. Kagami Biraki
28. Kodokan’s First Foreign Trainees
29. Te Kodokan’s First Heavyweight
30. Te Passing of My Father
31. Te Fujimi-cho Dojo
32. Judo Experts
33. Kodokan Ascendancy
34. Naval Academy Judo
35. European Journey
36. Return to Japan
37. Marriage
38. A New Posting
39. Return to Tokyo
40. Ministry of Education Appointment
41. Concurrent Duties
42. Te Hundred-Mat Dojo
43. Education of Chinese Students
44. Kodokan Branch Dojos
45. Training College Judo
46. Early Judo Instruction
47. Instructors’ Pay
48. Te Ideal Judo Instructor
49. Additional Judo Instructor Training
50. Te Introduction of Judo to Society
51. Attitudes Towards Judo Training
52. Hardship can be Good Medicine
53. Financial Constraints
54. Instructors’ Remunerations (by T. Ochiai)
55. Creation of Kodokan Judo Katas
56. Kata Research
57. Judo Katas Sanctioned by the Butokukai
58. Ju no Kata and Go no Kata
59. Itsutsu no Kata
60. Te Kodokan Foundation
61. Constitution of the Kodokan Foundation
62. Revised Constitution of the Kodokan Foundation
63. Nationwide Appeal for Funding
64. Magazine Publications
65. Purpose of the Judokai
66. Judokai Regulations
67. Judokai Branch Dojo Regulations
68. Launch of the Magazine ‘Judo’
69. Kano’s Advice to Judo Students in Training
70. Essence of Judo
71. Ju no Kata
72. Other Columns
73. Confused Ideology and Social Decadence
74. Travels following World War 1
75. Benefting Oneself and Others
76. Kodokan Culture Council
77. Rationale for the Culture Council
78. House of Peers Nomination
79. Elected to the House of Peers
80. Inauguration of the Kodokan Culture Council
81. Taisei Magazine
82. Association of Black Belt Holders
83. Kodokan Black Belt Association Regulations
84. Central Kodokan Black Belt Association Regulations
85. Tokyo Kodokan Black Belt Association Regulations
87. Culture Council – Kodokan Afliation
88. 1928 Overseas Travel Diary
AFTERWORD
GLOSSARY
BIBLIOGRAPHY
INDEX
P. 1
Judo Memoirs of Jigoro Kano

Judo Memoirs of Jigoro Kano

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Published by Trafford

In 1882, Kano opened his Kodokan dojo in Tokyo, where he taught jujutsu to his first class of nine students. His choice of the name ‘Kodokan’ symbolizes precocity in one so young and is highly significant, for it means ‘the institute where one is guided along the road to follow in life’, that is to say, a road that one travels as a means of self-cultivation, which Kano regarded as the optimum way to live one’s life. This cultivation, however, can only be attained following long years of training made with vigorous exertion in an effort to reach the ultimate goal: self-perfection.

At the age of twenty-four, Kano abruptly gave up the teaching of this ancient and altogether brutal activity and never taught jujutsu again. In his attempt to create for the modern age a non-violent, spiritually inspiring antagonistic art, he carried out research on several styles of jujutsu. Primarily in the interests of both safety and practicality, he altered and added his own devices to the techniques that he was later to incorporate into his newly conceived system of skills, which he named ‘Kodokan judo’. In lectures, Kano often stated the following: ‘The ultimate object of studying judo is to train and cultivate body and mind through practice in attack and defense, and by thus mastering the essentials of the art, to attain perfection of oneself and bring benefits to the world.’ He had sought to create in judo, therefore, something positive out of something largely negative.

In 1882, Kano opened his Kodokan dojo in Tokyo, where he taught jujutsu to his first class of nine students. His choice of the name ‘Kodokan’ symbolizes precocity in one so young and is highly significant, for it means ‘the institute where one is guided along the road to follow in life’, that is to say, a road that one travels as a means of self-cultivation, which Kano regarded as the optimum way to live one’s life. This cultivation, however, can only be attained following long years of training made with vigorous exertion in an effort to reach the ultimate goal: self-perfection.

At the age of twenty-four, Kano abruptly gave up the teaching of this ancient and altogether brutal activity and never taught jujutsu again. In his attempt to create for the modern age a non-violent, spiritually inspiring antagonistic art, he carried out research on several styles of jujutsu. Primarily in the interests of both safety and practicality, he altered and added his own devices to the techniques that he was later to incorporate into his newly conceived system of skills, which he named ‘Kodokan judo’. In lectures, Kano often stated the following: ‘The ultimate object of studying judo is to train and cultivate body and mind through practice in attack and defense, and by thus mastering the essentials of the art, to attain perfection of oneself and bring benefits to the world.’ He had sought to create in judo, therefore, something positive out of something largely negative.

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Publish date: Oct 3, 2008
Added to Scribd: May 07, 2014
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