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American Immigrants

American Immigrants

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Published by homism
For those who want to know about the United States of America
For those who want to know about the United States of America

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Published by: homism on Mar 07, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/07/2013

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International Information Programs:
Coordinator Jeremy F. CurtinExecutive Editor Jonathan MargolisCreative Director George Clack Editor-in-Chief Richard W. Huckaby Managing Editor Bruce Odessey Production Manager Janine Perry  Assistant Production Manager Sylvia ScottCopy Editor Rosalie TargonskiPhoto Editor Maggie J. SlikerGraphic Designer
 
Vincent HughesReference Specialists Anita N. GreenLynne Scheib Associate Editor
 
Michael J. Friedman 
The Bureau of International Information Programs of theU.S. Department of State publishes a monthly electronic journal under the
eJuna USA
logo. These journalsexamine major issues facing the United States and theinternational community, as well as U.S. society, values,thought, and institutions.One new journal is published monthly in English and isfollowed by versions in French, Portuguese, Russian, andSpanish. Selected editions also appear in Arabic, Chinese,and Persian. Each journal is catalogued by volume andnumber.The opinions expressed in the journals do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. government. TheU.S. Department of State assumes no responsibility forthe content and continued accessibility of Internet sitesto which the journals link; such responsibility residessolely with the publishers of those sites. Journal articles,photographs, and illustrations may be reproduced andtranslated outside the United States unless they carry explicit copyright restrictions, in which case permissionmust be sought from the copyright holders noted in the journal.The Bureau of International Information Programsmaintains current and back issues in several electronicformats at
htt:
 //www.aeica.gv/uicatins/ejunas.ht 
.Comments are welcome at your local U.S. Embassy or atthe editorial offices:Editor,
eJuna USA
IIP/PUBJU.S. Department of State301 4th Street, SW  Washington, DC 20547United States of AmericaE-mail: eJournalUSA@state.gov
Volume 13, Number 2
   J  u  p   i   t  e  r   i  m  a  g  e  s   (   R   F   )
 
I
t is often said that the United States is a country of immigrants. In fact, in the 1960s President John F.Kennedy, the great-grandson of Irish immigrants,published a book titled
 A Natin  Iigants 
. Thislabel is not quite accurate, however, since we know thatNative American civilizations had flourished in thisland for thousands of years before the first Europeansettlers arrived in the 1500s. What is true is that immigration has been acentral issue in determining this country’s history.The immigrant French farmer Hector St. Jean deCrevecoeur in 1781 posed a famous question: Whatis an American? A common answer among Americansever since is that being an American does not dependon where one’s ancestors came from. In the UnitedStates being an American depends, above all, onaccepting some fundamental American ideals —representative government, rule of law, individualfreedom.Over the course of this country’s history, Americans have welcomed waves of immigrants, butoften, as Hasia Diner points out in our lead essay, witha certain ambivalence toward the new arrivals. Eventoday immigration policy remains an issue on themind of many Americans. In particular, the questionof how to deal with illegal immigrants is the subject of much debate in the U.S. political campaign leading upto the 2008 elections. But this edition of 
eJuna 
 
USA
 is not about illegal immigrants: Our topic is how legalimmigrants to the United States have assumed theidentity of Americans, how generations of newcomersentered the mainstream.There are those who say that the United States’strength as a nation — its creativity, dynamism, andready willingness to embrace the new — results ingood part from the diversity that immigrants havebrought to these shores. We agree.
—The Edits 
 About This Issue
 J 
ournal
USA
1
Seattle
 
15.8%
San Jose
39.9 %
Sacramento
 17.4%
San Francisco
29.6 %
Los Angeles
34.2%
Riverside
22.3%
San Diego
23.3%
Honolulu
 18.1%
Las Vegas
 21.8%
Phoenix 
16.9%
 
Houston
21.5%
Tampa 
 12.4%
 Austin
 14.5%
New York 
 28.2%
Miami
37.0%
Dallas
18.0%
AKHI
Orlando
16.1%
 Washington, DC
20.1%
 WAORNVCAAZUTCONMTXOKKSNE WYMTIDSDIAARLAMN WIMSAL
 Atlanta 
13.0%
GASCMOILINOHTNNCVA WVPANYMEVTCTMAMINDFLKYNJDEMD
RINH
Boston
15.9%
Chicago
17.8%
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Department of Commerce
Metropolitan Areas with High Proportionof Foreign Born
 
Immigration by the Numbers

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