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Christ and the Creeds.

Christ and the Creeds.

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Published by glennpease
By Amory H. Bradford,


In the beginning Christianity was one man.
Historically it dates from Jesus of Nazareth.
The Christian Church believes that in a unique
way the Divine life was in that Man. The
Church is a growth and not a mechanism. At
the beginning it had no constitution, no by-
laws, no definite plan of operation, and gave no
indication of future greatness.
By Amory H. Bradford,


In the beginning Christianity was one man.
Historically it dates from Jesus of Nazareth.
The Christian Church believes that in a unique
way the Divine life was in that Man. The
Church is a growth and not a mechanism. At
the beginning it had no constitution, no by-
laws, no definite plan of operation, and gave no
indication of future greatness.

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Published by: glennpease on May 10, 2014
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CHRIST AD THE CREEDS. By Amory H. Bradford, In the beginning Christianity was one man. Historically it dates from Jesus of azareth. The Christian Church believes that in a unique way the Divine life was in that Man. The Church is a growth and not a mechanism. At the beginning it had no constitution, no by- laws, no definite plan of operation, and gave no indication of future greatness. As in the natural world a germ develops through varying cycles of existence, so the spiritual life in Jesus has grown into humanity until there is to-day the Church visible and invisible, and until the kingdom of God seems to be no more a dream., but a vivid and ever-extending reality. In a cathedral the style may be pure Gothic, Per- pendicular, or Romanesque, and we argue that one part was erected in one century, and another in a later century. But it is impossible to account for the variations in the Church in any such way. Its spirituality among the Hebrews, its intellectual and ethical forms among the Greeks, and its more practical manifestations among occidental peoples are to be explained by the adjustment of life to environment. In our 222 Christ and the Creeds. study of Christ and the Creeds we begin with the inquiry, Who was Christ ? The historian sees a Galilean peasant who died a violent death in the early years of his manhood. He was a working carpenter. Sud-
 
denly He emerged from obscurity, and began to attract others to Himself by personal power and spiritual teaching concerning profoundest themes, unexampled for its positiveness, its spirituality, and its application to the needs of humanity. Poor, and unappreciated by most, He moved among the people with a strange magnetism for the sick and outcast, speaking- words of superlative wisdom, talking of the Infinite as of a personal friend, and insisting that brotherhood was a reality. The Eomans in Jerusalem hardly noticed His presence, and ascribed the commotion which He excited to Jewish bigotry. Thus Jesus lived and died. He had been out of sight but a little while when those who before were not able to understand or appreciate Him, by a strange influence seemed to realise that He was the fulfilment of the prophe- cies of their nation. This thought possessed and inspired them, and they told it to their country- men. Soon the conviction, which at first had been confined to Jews, reached other minds, and those who dwelt on the banks of the Orontes, in Cyprus, and on the highlands of Asia, found in the teachings of this Man a message from the unseen and eternal. Christ and the Creeds. 223 Wonderful changes in individual character were wrought ; those who had been provincial became broad, loving, and filled with a passion to carry their knowledge to the world. And so, across to Greece, into the midst of the decaying glories of Athens and the sensuous splendour of Corinth, moved men in whom Jesus had aroused a con- sciousness of kinship with the Divine, and a faith that all men are brothers. Their numbers
 
increased, and that which had been spoken in Syria, Asia, and Greece reached Rome, and by a process swift and mysterious the faith that that Carpenter had come to the earth with a revelation from the spiritual world won cre- dence, not only among ignorant and outcast, but also among cultered and powerful. In three centuries the Empire acknowledged nominal allegiance to Jesus. From that day His sway has continued to expand. Those spiritually dead have been raised by faith in Him, and filled with a passion to speak of Him to others, going from land to land, penetrating equatorial forests, and singing songs to the praise of the Master among the ice-floes of the orth and in the jungles of the South. Two or three facts should be noticed in con- nection with this unique movement. When the story of Jesus has been told with the most sim- plicity, and has had its natural results, it has always worked a change in the direction of righteousness. This young Galilean drove out 224 Christ and the Creeds. narrowness, bigotry, dishonesty, impurity, tra- ditionalism, and brought in reverence for God, love for man, purity of heart, and holiness of life. Thus many who reject the churches acknowledge the mastery of Jesus. Christ and righteousness are always together, and wherever He has triumphed, more spiritual individual life, sweeter home life, and purer public life have always been found. Another line of influences are associated with this Carpenter of Galilee. At first His story

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