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Collective Security Essay - Define “collective security”. How is this principle articulated in the aims of the UN and has that organisation been successful in achieving those aims?

Collective Security Essay - Define “collective security”. How is this principle articulated in the aims of the UN and has that organisation been successful in achieving those aims?

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Published by fhorwich
Define “collective security”. How is this principle articulated in the aims of the UN and has that organisation been successful in achieving those aims?
Define “collective security”. How is this principle articulated in the aims of the UN and has that organisation been successful in achieving those aims?

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: fhorwich on Nov 10, 2009
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05/11/2014

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Florence Horwich (ID:200383095)
Define “collective security”. How is this principlearticulated in the aims of the UN and has thatorganisation been successful in achieving thoseaims?
Dr Jason Ralph – International Politics
Word Count: 2,907
 
Define “collective security”. How is this principle articulated in the aims of the UN? Has that organisation been successful in achieving those aims?
This essay will focus on ““collective security””. It will begin by amalgamatingpolitical philosophers’ definitions in an attempt to come to a clear understandingof what ‘““collective security””’ actually is. Subsequently, the essay will go on toargue, using the failings of its embodiment to date in the aims of the UnitedNations, that the concept remains a political ideology.The concept of ““collective security”” can be said to have begun with the Prussianphilosopher Immanuel Kant in his Second Definitive Article when he referred to a‘pacific federation’ as a ‘particular kind of league’ that ‘would seek to end
all wars
for good’. He saw the possibility of promoting and maintaining internationalpeace through an extensive partnership of committed states. This is the keyconcept of ““collective security””. According to Inis Claude, (an influentialphilosopher in this study) ““collective security”” was a ‘system for themaintenance of international peace’ which was evolved as a ‘replacement for thesystem commonly known as the Balance of Power’ by the internationalcommunity. It was the argument that through ‘consensus, commitment andorganisation’, international peace could be facilitated and ensured. ‘Superior’ toits predecessor -the Balance of Power- it would transcend the reliance ondeterrence of competing alliances through a network or scheme of ‘nationalcommitments and international mechanisms.’ More recently, Claude argues that
 
the term has become a synonym for world peace, and that it has moved from itsoriginal definition as a method for preserving world order, to a ‘catchalldesignation for a variety of means and even for the end itself’.The central idea of ““collective security”” is that there is certainty backed by legalobligation, that any aggression to one state will be confronted with collectivesanctions. Its logic lies in two-fold: that the collective power of all the memberswill act as a deterrent to an aggressor, and that through the promotion of co-operation rather than competition, it ‘mitigates the rivalry and hostility of a self-help world’ and creates a less war prone environment““Collective security”” has been marked by disagreement in its structuring andregulation of the international system since its first incarnation in the League of Nations and in the treaty of Versailles in 1919. In the wake of the Second WorldWar a revised attempt at the targets and functionality of the concept resulted inThe United Nations.““Collective security”was the primary reason for the establishment of theorganisation. Whittaker states that the principle behind the United Nations is that‘states unite to maintain, develop and protect a world progressively freed fromconflict, poverty and threat’ -a definition which holds clear parallels to that foundearlier in this study. The United Nations Charter is the treaty of this organisationwhich codifies its rules and practices, it is the articulation of this aim.

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