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The Way The Wind Blew

The Way The Wind Blew

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Published by nichtmitmir
Jacobs, certainly with a leftist perspective, attempts to explain the motives of the Weather Underground. Classify them as terrorists or glorify them as heroes, but either way, they made an undisputable mark on history if one is willing to take the time to write reviews characterizing them as both. The fact is that in 200 pages, one can not clearly express what the Weather Organization did, why, and when those actions occured and why that timing was deemed necessary. In spite of that, Jacobs gives a great framework, regardless of your perspectives on the movement, for a cursory survey. In that context, this is perhaps the best book on the movement. If you are seriously researching the movement, this is great background, but in 200 pages, you'll never get the whole story.
Jacobs, certainly with a leftist perspective, attempts to explain the motives of the Weather Underground. Classify them as terrorists or glorify them as heroes, but either way, they made an undisputable mark on history if one is willing to take the time to write reviews characterizing them as both. The fact is that in 200 pages, one can not clearly express what the Weather Organization did, why, and when those actions occured and why that timing was deemed necessary. In spite of that, Jacobs gives a great framework, regardless of your perspectives on the movement, for a cursory survey. In that context, this is perhaps the best book on the movement. If you are seriously researching the movement, this is great background, but in 200 pages, you'll never get the whole story.

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Categories:Types, Brochures
Published by: nichtmitmir on Nov 11, 2009
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04/07/2014

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The Way The Wind Blew 
A History Of The Weather Underground 
Author: Ron JacobsPublisher: VersoDate: 1997ISBN: 1-85984-167-8
 
Table of Contents
Preface....................................................................................................................1
 
1. 1968: SDS Turns Left...........................................................................................3
 
2. Weather Dawns: The Break and the Statement.................................................13
 
3. Into the Streets: Days of Rage..........................................................................21
 
4. Down the Tunnel: Going Underground ..............................................................35
 
5. Women, The Counterculture, And The Weather People .....................................45
 
6. Changing Weather.............................................................................................61
 
7. A Second Wind? The
Prairie Fire
Statement ......................................................75
 
8. The End of the Tunnel: Weather and Its Successors..........................................83
 
Bibliography.............................................................................................................i
 
A Weather Chronology ............................................................................................v
 
The Cast...............................................................................................................xiii
 
List of Acronyms .................................................................................................xvii
 
Illustrations............................................................................................................a
 
 
1
Preface
I first became aware of Weatherman in the fall of 1970, after opening a copy of 
Quicksilver Times
and reading about the group's assistance in Timothy Leary's escape from a prison inCalifornia. Although I personally preferred the antics of that other psychedelic prankster KenKesey, the fact that a political organization had aided the unreservedly apolitical Leary toescape fascinated me.Then, at high school on a US military base in West Germany, where I was involved inorganizing against the Vietnam war, I began reading as much as I could about Weathermanand its history. I found its politics difficult to understand but always admired its style and itsability to hit targets which in my view deserved to be hit. When I returned to the US afterhigh school I floated in and out of organizations on the Left, where the presence of Weatherwas always felt, as an example both of commitment and of the necessity to organize deeppopular support. My own political path has led me to shun military actions in favor of mass-based organizing, but I believe Weather's insistence on an anti-racist and anti-imperialist(and, belatedly, anti-sexist) analysis was fundamental to my political development.The New Left was constantly changing, reacting to events in the world and in the movementitself. Many of today's critics view the Students for a Democratic Society of late 1968 andearly 1969 (and afterwards) in relation to its original intentions as expressed in the PortHuron Statement. When they write about its history after the June 1969 convention, theyoften do so in terms of a betrayal of the ideals of the organization before it split. It is mycontention that what happened at that convention and afterwards was not so much the endof the New Left as yet another sharp turn in the history of the Left itself. Another tendencyin many writers is to relate this part of its history with an emphasis on the personalitiesinvolved and not the politics. While they are arguably intertwined, it is my hope that thistext is primarily a political history of Weatherman, and not merely an account of personalities.
 Every attempt has been made to ensure that all citations are complete. However, given thenature of the North American underground press, it has not always been possible to providecomplete information, especially in the case of specific page numbers. Also, in the earlychapters of the text, I refer to the New Left as such. However, as the lines between the NewLeft and Old Left become blurred, I use the more general term, the Left.

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